Monthly Archives: June 2010

Leatherback turtle nesting in daylight on Barbados’ East coast

Dear Barbados Free Press,

I spotted this leatherback turtle nesting along the east coast at the end of May. The sighting drew a large crowd of both locals and visitors. It is a very rare occurrence to see them nesting and even rarer to see them nesting during the day. I thought you might enjoy these pictures for your publication.

Christian Payne

(click on photos for larger size)


Filed under Barbados, Nature, Wildlife

Jane Shattuck-Hoyos asks “Why is Jamaica suffering while Barbados prospers?”

Could it be that Bajan shirt-tails are tucked in?

The difference in Jamaican and Bajan history and economic outcomes? Nevermind that garbage about the best-behaved slaves were offloaded on Bim and the rebels were shipped to Jamaica. (Ya… we still hear that trash when the rum is flowing up in Grape Hall from people who really should know better.)

Our friend Jane at Planet Barbados found a US Public Radio programme that looks at the differences between Jamaica and Bim and where we currently stand as countries and societies. For my part I don’t agree with the programme’s thrust that economic policies were the sole cause of the different outcomes that we see – I think that cultural differences also played a critical role in the differing histories of Barbados and Jamaica. Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Jamaica, Slavery

Fewer than 2000 fans show for the ENTIRE West Indies & South Africa Test. looks at why…

Excellent article by Michelle McDonald of

Less than 200 fans on Sunday! What went wrong?

Do you know anyone who attended the recent West Indies – South Africa Test for even a few hours?

Nope, we at Barbados Free Press don’t know anyone either.

We’ve seen the articles in the Bajan media over the past few months lamenting the death of Bajan cricket, but we’ve also seen the boys out as usual everywhere having fun, growing and challenging themselves and their friends.

Cricket in Barbados is not dead, but something decidedly unhealthy is happening at the professional level and we’re not sure how to fix it. How do you put the soul back into what used to be a party and is now a wake? Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Cricket, Sports

Barbados Commissioner of Police accused of illegal wiretapping

UPDATED: April 28, 2012

BFP revisits another one of those ‘dropped off the face of the earth’ stories.

Can anyone tell us the outcome of Commissioner of Police Dottin being accused of illegal wiretapping two years ago? The whole story just disappeared from the Bajan news media. Maybe we missed the final story… maybe Dottin was proven innocent? OR… was some secret resolution arrived at?

Welcome to the Bajan news media – your filter on the world whether you know it or not…

Original story published June 28, 2010…

Police Commissioner Dottin claims “national security” as reason for non-disclosure of wiretaps.

A suspended Royal Barbados Police Force officer claims in an affidavit before the Supreme Court that Commissioner Darwin Dottin conducted illegal wiretapping against him during an internal investigation. (See The Nation article Phone Bug? – also at the end of this article)

There is little doubt that police wiretapping of RBPF Inspector Anderson Bowen’s phone conversations happened. Bowen states in his affidavit that Commissioner Dottin played the phone recordings for him during an internal investigation interview. The phone tappings took place at Bowen’s home, his mother’s home and at Black Rock police station.

Whatever alleged crime that Commissioner Dottin was investigating, our primary concern is whether or not this wiretapping was legal. I mean, our police can’t just go off and wiretap anyone they want to …or can they? Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Freedom Of Information, Human Rights, Police

Canadian investor Bob Verdun accosted by Barbados Boscobel Toll Gang

Verdun the latest victim to complain of gang activity against tourists

Last Friday Bob Verdun gave the noon lecture at DLP Headquarters and detailed 15 ways that the Government can improve our tourism product without spending a penny. Journalist Ian Bourne attended and is writing a series of articles on Mr. Verdun’s message. You can read Ian’s first article at his Bajan Reporter online news site.

Unsurprisingly, one of Mr. Verdun’s primary tourism concerns is security, because he knows as we all should that without security the other three “esses” – sun, sea and sand – don’t matter. What is interesting is that Mr. Verdun confessed during his lecture that he, like thousands of others, fell victim to the Boscobel Road Toll Gang and that he does not go to this area of Barbados anymore. Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Police, Race, Tourism, Travel, Traveling and Tourism

Brazil – Barbados GOL flight a tremendous achievement!

Just for the record, I would like to applaud all those involved in securing the direct non-stop flight from GOL flight from Sao Paulo including the Minister of Tourism, BTA, Barbados Diplomatic Corp and BHTA.

It is a tremendous achievement, and I believe it offers the very best option in terms of route, carrier, duration of flight, connecting city possibilities and gateway.

From comments made by the Minister in the media, he is not expecting every flight to be full in the initial operating period, and however sceptical some may be about this foray into South America, this is in my humble opinion is a very realistic approach. Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Tourism, Travel, Traveling and Tourism

BP Oil Spill – Crew hoping to tap into well 18,000 feet beneath the sea surface.

Thanks to Colin L. Beadon for sending us this diagram of the operation to stop the leaking BP oil well in the Caribbean.

After looking at the operation, all I can think of is we have to find a better, safer way to harvest the oil we need than to allow drilling in 5,000 feet of open water right in what could be called hurricane city. This mess was bound to happen, especially when the oil companies are left to themselves to supervise their operations. As it turns out, most of the people in the US Departments that were to be supervising the oil industry are good ‘ol boys themselves who used to work for the oil companies. Reminds me of Shell in Barbados hiring a consulting company to tell us everything is fine when we know it is not so.

Anyway, our thanks to Colin, and have a look at this diagram and imaging the risks in the real world of deep sea oil drilling… Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Disaster, Energy, Environment