Tag Archives: Jamaica

Sheri Veronica – As school children in Barbados we were taught to hate Jamaicans

Sheri Veronica Barbados

“Respect Jamaicans”

by Sheri Veronica

THE TRUTH IS, we were taught to hate JAMAICANS.  As a little girl in primary school, our teacher taught us that Barbados was the jewel of the Caribbean.  We were taught that any mad/crazy slave or any slave who could not take instructions, were shipped off to Jamaica.  This was the mandate, I supposed in my little head (or was that taught to me also), of every Caribbean island.  Send the mad and **aggressive slaves to Jamaica.  Then as time passed and you start to see clearer, meet people and question things, you soon realize that the insurgent slaves were the brave ones.  They were the men and women who could not be broken…

… continue with a good read at Sheri Veronica’s blog

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Filed under Africa, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Jamaica, Race, Slavery, Sugar

Request for assistance in solving murder of Father Charles Brown

Where is murder suspect Rohan Deacon?

To the wonderful law abiding citizens of Jamaica… We the family members of the late Father Charles Brown would like to thank you for the kindness bestowed on us throughout our ordeal.

This coming July 24th will be one year since he was brutally taken away from doing the good work of helping the poor, downtrodden, the church and most of all his relatives.

We are asking if you could assist the diligent police officers who have been working relentlessly to locate the person of interest Rohan Deacon to no avail.

If anyone knows his whereabouts please contact Hunts Bay CIB 9237111, 9013121, 119 or Crime Stop at 311.

Thanks again for your outpouring of love and support have a bless day.

Barbados Free Press

Father Charles Brown Jamaica MurderDear People of Jamaica

We are the family of Father Charles Brown, lovingly known to many as ‘Uncle Charles’.

On the 24th July the senseless murder and loss of our beloved brother, uncle and servant of God, Father Charles Brown has sent ripples of pain and heartache across oceans and continents.

To us ‘Uncle Charles’ was a vibrant and funny man, he really loved a good joke, very understanding and adored animals, he devoted his life to the service of others, often sacrificing his own needs.

Uncle Charles was known to go without food or sleep in order to provide support and comfort to families in grief, to be a character witness for those facing the courts or to joyfully perform the baptism of a baby, welcoming them into the world with his kindness and warm smile.

He spent his life giving from his heart and we have had him…

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Filed under Crime & Law, Jamaica

Caribbean Court of Justice judgements cannot be enforced in Barbados!

CCJ can't make Barbados pay Shanique Myrie judgement

CCJ can’t make Barbados pay Shanique Myrie judgement

As an old friend used to say “IANAL” – “I am not a lawyer”

But if a judgement from the CCJ cannot be enforced, what’s the use? Isn’t the whole justice system a farce then? Why bother taking anything to the CCJ?

How does this impact foreign investors who might be interested in doing business in Barbados or other Caribbean nations?

Can someone please explain this to me. Why bother having a CCJ if the judges have no power?

CCJ lacks mechanism to enforce Shanique Myrie judgement, says judge

ST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC) – A judge with the Trinidad-based Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) Friday said there was no mechanism to enforce the judgement following the recent ruling in the case involving the Jamaican national Shanique Myrie.

Myrie successfully sued the Barbados Government after she was refused entry into the island in 2011. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Jamaica, Politics

BFP’s George: “I could just kiss Mac Fingall, but he wouldn’t like it – as cute as he is.”

Mac Fingall Queer Barbados

“THE WORLD IS NOW embroiled in discussion on homosexuality and same-sex marriage. It is a discussion that should be of concern to everyone for if allowed to dominate it could spell the end of mankind.”

Mac Fingall in The Nation article Abnormal behaviour

Gay Love and Hate in Barbados

by George (with Cliverton)

Mac Fingall says that mankind will end because of gay love. Mac and I don’t agree about that, although I do agree that he has a right to say whatever he wants to. If Mac wants to talk ’nuff foolishness an climb de tree higher so his bare bum show more, he should climb higher.

I could kiss Mac because his seriously foolish talk makes people re-think their attitudes and words of hate towards gays and lesbians. (Also I could kiss Mac because he is cute – maybe even a handsome devil. I mean, look at that smile!)

When people really think about what Mac is saying, and then seriously think about their own attitudes, I believe that people can and do change their minds. Mac’s newspaper column forced people to consider why they hate gays.

More and more people these days are coming to the realization that gays are not a threat to society: they are just people. Mac doesn’t like that people are re-considering their attitudes to gays and lesbians so he wrote a newspaper column. The attempts like Mac’s to dehumanize or stigmatize fellow human beings for the way they are is no different than when there were ‘coloured’ and ‘white’ washrooms.

God made Mac one way. God made other people another way. Mac says God made me wrong. According to Mac, God made me imperfect and abnormal.

Tell that to God, Mac. Tell that to God.

Mac… You want to know what happens when people don’t view gays as real human beings?

This happens:

Jamaica: Cross dressing teen killed by mob

Posted by NEWSROOM on 22/07/2013 at 7:42pm

A teenager was set upon by a mob and killed at a party in St. James overnight. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Jamaica

Jamaican drug smugglers plead “Guilty” in Barbados. The Devil responds…


The Devil went down to Jamaica

by Nevermind Kurt

I cannot imagine swallowing or shoving two pounds of herb into my body, driving to the airport in Jamaica, going through the whole check-in / security thing, waiting, boarding, flying and arriving in Bim. I don’t care how much they pay me, it’s not going to happen. I know how desperate some folks can be though, and I know how others take advantage of them – or force them – to do things they don’t really want to do.

The masterminds always walk free, but the little people do the time and pay the price.

Eight Jamaicans pleaded guilty today in Barbados court to smuggling ganja in their body cavities. The eight are part of the 30 or abouts passengers given a “close inspection” upon arrival at Grantley Adams Internationals Airport. They are about to do up to three years in Dodds Prison and that is no easy go – nevermind matter what some say.

Drug mules are the Privates. Who are the Generals?

Think about the logistics of stuffing twenty or thirty drug mules all at once and getting them onto an airplane bound for Barbados. Think about the recruitment. Think about the enemas the day before. Think about the pickup in Barbados and drug retrieval. Accommodation, meals, controls on movement, security. Flight back. Payment. Distribution. This was a big operation.

Good for the Bajan authorities who identified and arrested this lot – but where are the bosses? Where are the money men and organizers in Barbados? Why aren’t they being arrested?

Why no big-ups arrested? The answer is a no-brainer: the mules won’t talk because to do so would be to pronounce their own death sentence in Dodds.

Some folks say “Just herb, wat the harm?”

I don’t believe that herb is the problem. It’s the criminal system behind the herb that steps in because the drug is against the law. Like Chicago in the 1920’s – there wouldn’t have been any Al Capone without Prohibition of alcohol.

Was Peter Tosh right? “Nevermind. Legalize it”

Should we legalize it? That’s a big big question. I may have inhaled a bit of smoke myself in the past. I didn’t kill or rape anyone, so I can see that the problem is not the herb itself. It is the criminal activity that results from the illegality of grass. That’s my opinion and others at BFP (like Marcus and Robert) disagree on that most vehemently. “Vehemently” See? I can still pull out the $25 words when I think hard so I must have a few brain cells left. Robert’s Beefeater Gin is probably worse overall.

You know my name is Nevermind Kurt. Why “Nevermind”? Why “Kurt”? Why the photo of him with my name?

Nevermind. Now you know part of who I am, or rather, once was. 😉

Further Reading

The Gleaner, August 5, 2011: Jamaican Drug Mules Held In Barbados

RJR News: J’cans in Barbados sentenced after pleading guilty to drug charges

OUR THANKS: to BFP reader UB for suggesting the YouTube video!

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Jamaica, Police

Loveridge: Jamaica’s protectionism hurting Caribbean unity, tourism

PM Golding tilts the playing field against REDjet and Barbados

In the next 24 hours, some 6,000 people will read this article by Adrian Loveridge. We can only hope that Jamaica’s Prime Minister will be among them.

Has REDjet been treated fairly?

by Adrian Loveridge - small hotel owner

It’s a big question and without all the facts in hand it would be difficult to be totally objective.

However, if you ask the questions, is the concept of a low cost carrier desirable in the Caribbean and can it be made to work, then the answers have to be yes, and probably if they are allowed to operate in a truly commercial environment.

When you can book a week-long cruise that visits seven Caribbean islands with travel, accommodation and food all included for less than the cost of a return airline ticket to one of those territories, then something has to be fundamentally wrong.

LIAT now enjoys a virtual monopoly on certain routes out of Barbados, which includes Puerto Rico after the withdrawal of American Eagle.

According to their website, the cheapest return flights (a round trip of 1,140 miles) bookable in late June to San Juan is US$664.09, which includes a whopping US$176.09 in taxes and add-ons.

For exactly the same dates, return flights to New York with American Airlines cost US$615.50 (including US$177.50 in taxes) and US$664.80 (US$166.80 taxes) with JetBlue, a journey involving 4,182 miles or nearly four times farther both in miles and flying distance than Puerto Rico.

“If LIAT had competition on the San Juan route of course fares would be lower and that is why we need an airline like REDjet.”

REDjet has been criticised by some for having not having a viable business plan but does LIAT or the amalgamated Caribbean Airlines and Air Jamaica?

Without past massive taxpayer subsidies all three of these carriers would have perished by the wayside years ago and the much delayed partial assimilation of the ‘Lovebird’ by CAL has also been finally made possible only after the government of Jamaica wrote-off off huge debts.

And we have to remember that in its entire 42-year history, Air Jamaica recorded a profit in only one of them, 1986.

So when we talk about fairness, what do we really mean?

To the best of my knowledge the owners of REDJet have not asked any government for taxpayer bailouts, heavily subsidised fuel, preferential interest rates or any other major concessions. They just want to operate in a commercially level playing field where competition, supply and demand and all the other factors that in the ‘real world’ decide economic survival or failure.

The people of Jamaica now own a 16 percent stake of Caribbean Airlines and it has been designated that island’s national carrier to the world.

Clearly, Prime Minister Golding is keen to protect that interest and recently stated he was “not saying the REDjet application would not be approved, but it would have to be allowed with the CAL deal in mind”.

Perhaps he has every right to be so protective, but does it really foster better Caribbean unity or take us a step closer to marketing the region as one?

The writing is on the wall, the president of the Barbados Hotel and Tourism has already graphically warned that summer tourism business is down.

REDjet has clearly demonstrated that it can drive additional traffic to Guyana and there is no reason to believe it wouldn’t be the same for Trinidad and Kingston. This just may reduce the real risk of additional hotel closures and job losses this year.

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Jamaica

Jamaican Prime Minister alleges dirty tricks in Barbados airline war

PM Golding says Barbados “held up” Caribbean Airlines aircraft in “aggressive action”

The REDjet saga continues with the Jamaican Prime Minister accusing Barbados of harassing a Caribbean Airlines aircraft at Grantley Adams International Airport.

“What I’m told took place two days ago when a Caribbean Airlines plane was held up, I don’t want to use the word detained, in Barbados and the suspicion is that it is an aggressive action, and I hope it is not, because that is not the way we in Caricom should resolve our issues.”

PM Golding to The Gleaner: Red Jet Row Heightens

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Politics

REDjet Update: Political problems with Trinidad and Jamaica

“A few weeks ago we at Barbados Free Press criticized REDjet for launching without having all the paperwork in place with Trinidad and Tobago.

We take it all back.”

Caribbean Airlines files complaints with Jamaica and T&T

REDjet: “Political delays beyond our control”

The launch of any new business is a formidable task, but when you’re talking launching a new airline into a politically charged world of protected competitors… now you’re talking trouble!

And so it is with REDjet as the governments of Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago seem to be doing everything they can to block the new upstart from Barbados.

A few weeks ago we at Barbados Free Press criticized REDjet for launching without having all the paperwork in place with Trinidad and Tobago.

We take it all back.

We take it back because we now see what the game was and is: to keep REDjet waiting forever until they give up. That’s what the governments of T&T and Jamaica would like to see happen and they are working hard to protect other airlines from those Bajan upstarts.

We’re guessing but it looks to us that after being blocked for over a year in various attempts to move forward, the REDjet team came to the conclusion that the issue had to go before the public. REDjet had to launch to force its way into the market or else they would never launch.

We’re behind REDjet 100% because the simple truth is this: if REDjet fails, the big losers will be the ordinary people of the Caribbean who, for the first time, will be able to fly to other islands without having to sell their first born children.

Further Reading

Barbados Today: REDjet still awaits T&T green light

Caribbean 360: REDjet says CAL protection blocking Jamaica flights

Go-Jamaica: JCAA tight-lipped about Redjet’s delay

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Jamaica, Politics, Trinidad and Tobago

Cave Hill students grieve for Roderick Reid, murdered in Jamaica

UWI Law Student stabbed over the weekend

Our heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of Roderick Reid, who was expected to return to his studies at Cave Hill yesterday.

Roderick’s body was found on Saturday in the boot of a car in Kingston, Jamaica.

That’s about all we know at this time. If anyone has a photo of Roderick, we would include it. Roddy was well liked and had many friends.

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Jamaica

Jane Shattuck-Hoyos asks “Why is Jamaica suffering while Barbados prospers?”

Could it be that Bajan shirt-tails are tucked in?

The difference in Jamaican and Bajan history and economic outcomes? Nevermind that garbage about the best-behaved slaves were offloaded on Bim and the rebels were shipped to Jamaica. (Ya… we still hear that trash when the rum is flowing up in Grape Hall from people who really should know better.)

Our friend Jane at Planet Barbados found a US Public Radio programme that looks at the differences between Jamaica and Bim and where we currently stand as countries and societies. For my part I don’t agree with the programme’s thrust that economic policies were the sole cause of the different outcomes that we see – I think that cultural differences also played a critical role in the differing histories of Barbados and Jamaica. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Jamaica, Slavery

‘Dudus’ Coke arrested. Will he live to see trial?

News reports say that Shower Posse gang leader Christopher Dudus Coke was captured at a checkpoint in Jamaica today – apparently on his way to surrender himself either to US Embassy personnel or local “friendly” police.

Some stories say that Coke cut a deal with the US authorities and will not oppose extradition. Some news commentators say that he wants to get out of Jamaica as quickly as possible because there is a wind change in the works that might prove unhealthy as certain Jamaican politicians are worried about what Coke might say at his trial. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Jamaica, Police, Political Corruption, Politics, Politics & Corruption

Dubai’s Khaleej Times: The difference between “mature” Barbados and Jamaica’s “stalled democracy” is the link between gangs and Jamaican politicians.

Jamaican gang leader Dudus Coke & Clico's Leroy Parris - There are differences, but both these powerful and wealthy men secretly finance their chosen politicians.

Another warning that Barbados must get vigilant about Political Financing

Coming from a similar colonial-slavery background as most of its Caribbean neighbours, Barbados has managed to achieve much greater economic prosperity, peace and political stability. Why is that?

An article in the Khaleei Times looks at the reasons for the differences between Jamaica, Barbados and a few of our neighbours and concludes, among other things, that the cosy relationship between gangs and politicians has much to do with Jamaica’s stalled progress since its independence in 1962.

While I don’t think the article is comprehensive about all the reasons for the differences between Jamaica and Barbados, once again we are reminded that citizens and societies have a vital interest in regulating the money that finances politicians and political parties.

Thanks to both the Barbados Labour Party and the Democratic Labour Party, we in Barbados have no laws, no oversight and no transparency about the millions of dollars received by Barbados politicians for (cough, cough) “campaign financing”.

Simply put, our Bajan democracy is at risk when politicians can secretly receive money from any person or organisation and then secretly spend the money – all without rules, oversight or legal accountability.

And that is exactly the way Bajan politicians and their financiers like it.

Here are a few snippets from the Khaleei Times article…

“For decades (Jamaican) political leaders have used armed local gangs to mobilise voters in their constituencies; the gangs are rewarded with the spoils of power, in particular housing and employment contracts they can dole out. Opposition leaders counter with their own gangs, resulting in chronic violence during election seasons.

These gangs eventually moved into international drug trafficking, with their leaders, called “dons,” becoming ever more powerful. The tables turned quite some time ago, with the politicians becoming dependent on the dons for their survival.”

(snip)

“To see what happens when a country accomplishes both (economic and democratic) transitions, we need only look at the neighbouring Afro-Caribbean island of Barbados. It has a similar colonial past, and became independent just three years after Jamaica.

Yet Barbados’ per capita income is now more than twice that of Jamaica, its standard of living puts it among the developed world and Freedom House places it on a par with Western Europe in terms of the maturity of its democracy. Sure enough, Barbados also has one of the lowest homicide rates in the hemisphere. Barbados, unfortunately, is not typical…”

… read the entire article at the Khaleej Times Jamaica’s bloody democracy

Further Reading at Barbados Free Press

May 24, 2020 – Respected community leader: Some Barbados politicians might be taking payoffs from drug gangs

May 25, 2010 – Barbados roadsign shows support for Jamaica’s Dudus Coke!

May 31, 2010 – Mexico’s drug gangs into politics. Is campaign financing any different where you live?

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Ethics, Freedom Of Information, Jamaica, Political Corruption, Politics, Politics & Corruption

Thumbs Up for Barbados Prime Minister as he cancels Vybz Kartel, Mavado concert

Auntie Moses plants a kiss on the PM for his leadership.

David Thompson says no to violent Jamaican dance hall culture

Prime Minister Thompson just delivered an unequivocal message: We the people of Barbados don’t want the violent dance hall culture of Jamaica in our country and we sure don’t want our young people exposed to the people who promote this destructive influence.

The PM spoke in a very politic manner, giving as little offense as he could in the circumstances. One has to admire not only the statesmanship of his delivery but also the leadership he exhibited by wading into a mess that had become important enough to require the intervention of the Prime Minister.

Said the PM, “I don’t feel in this particular instance people should be demonised for a well-intentioned effort that could have gone awry, but in circumstances where there is public concern and where the State needs to intervene to protect our young people we will do it…”

Violent culture is a circle – not a linear cause and effect

We won’t re-hash the entire controversy here – except to say that Jamaican violence is a circular problem that is fed by the music of the day and the personalities associated with the music.

Folks can argue about where the circle of Jamaican cultural violence started but that doesn’t really matter – The violence inspires the music that inspires the tribalism that inspires the violence that inspires the music… and on and on and on.

The violence is not a linear problem with specific causes and effects – but a circle that feeds upon itself.

Prime Minister David Thompson just damaged that circle by removing some of the music and conflict personalities from our society – and Barbados is safer and better off for his decision.

Thanks, Prime Minister!

Now – What about the Police leadership?

Or, to be more specific: is conflict between senior police officers negatively impacting the Royal Barbados Police Force?

In the last few days the Barbados public was treated to the disgusting spectacle of Police Commissioner Darwin Dottin having to admit that his Deputy undermined his orders and authority regarding the Vybz Kartel, Mavado concert. Dottin had announced that the police would not grant a license for the show. Hinds countermanded that decision in public.

And the very worst of it was that Commissioner Dottin had to hear about it on the public radio!

The Prime Minister was forced to step in due in part to the leadership punch-up between Dottin and Hinds. That too is embarrassing for all concerned.

So… who should resign, Dottin or Hinds?

That gets complex because it is more than time for Dottin to go – but in this case Hinds was wrong to go behind the Commissioner’s back.

Perhaps the answer is to fire retire both of them and promote one of the three people we know of in the RBPF who have the right combination of professionalism and leadership talent.

Who are they? Ha! We won’t say because that would surely poison their chances. Let’s just hope that something big happens soon to provide the kind of leadership that the RBPF deserves.

Further Reading

This Nation article is a pretty good synopsis of the disgusting public quarrel between Dottin and Hinds…

Angry Chief

THE DECISION yesterday to give the green light for this weekend’s controversial Vybz Kartel and Mavado show has opened a potential row between Commissioner of Police Darwin Dottin and his deputy Bertie Hinds.

In an exclusive interview, a visibly upset Dottin told THE NATION yesterday that he first learnt of the decision to grant licences for the show through a radio news flash while on his way to Grantley Adams International Airport.

“It sends a very bad image and message that the Commissioner of Police has been having discussions on these issues and nobody had the decency to consult him.

“It reflects very poorly on the administration of the force,” he added.

Confirmed reports indicated that Hinds, who acts as commissioner while Dottin is on leave, made the decision to grant the promoters requested licences for the show during a meeting yesterday.

When contacted for comment that he acted contrary to the force’s protocol, Hinds would only say: “I have nothing to say, full-stop.”

… continue reading this article at The Nation: Angry Chief

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Jamaica, Music, Police

Jamaica’s Canadian tourism up 28 percent over last year!

canada_barbados_flag

Caricom Unity? Forget about it… it’s every country for itself in a fight for survival on the Tourism Battleground.

Jamaican Tourism Minister personally met with 300 Canadian travel agents in Canada’s Western Provinces

Despite the global economic crisis, Jamaican Tourism Minister Edmund Bartlett says a record number of Canadian tourists are expected to visit Jamaica this winter.

“Canada is our fastest growing market,” the Jamaican Information Service (JIS) quoted Bartlett as saying in Toronto.

“Two years ago, the Canadian market was providing around 150,000 stopover visitors and for this year we are looking at close to 300,000, which represents a 28 percent increase over last year,” he added.

Bartlett recently visited Canada to thank travel partners for helping to make Canada the fastest growing market for Jamaica. He met with some 300 travel agents, airline officials and four operators in Edmonton, Calgary and Winnipeg, cities that have shown encouraging growth in recent times…

… from eTurboNews.com’s article Jamaica looks forward to record number Canadian visitors this winter season

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Tourism, Travel, Traveling and Tourism

Nex Generation Magazine Looking For Bajan Writers

Nex Generation Mag

Nex Generation Magazine is a new publication dedicated to empowering the Caribbean family. Based in Jamaica, the magazine is keen to get stories from Barbados and several other English speaking Caribbean islands on issues that effect family life from a grassroots/community perspective.

The magazine was originally published in the UK from Jan 2004 -Dec 2006, before publisher Dekenu Shepherd and his wife (who is from Barbados) relocated to Jamaica in March 2007, to raise their children in the Caribbean.

The premier issue has just been launched and the Shepherds are currently busy preparing for the August 2009 issue. Initially the primary distribution markets will be Jamaica, Barbados & Trinidad & Tobago also the UK, US & Canada.

Nex Generation Magazine is interested in hearing from writers in Barbados and the English-speaking Caribbean and can be contacted via email at …

dekenu (AT) nexgeneration.org

Editor’s Note: The above was forwarded to us from a local (not BFP) writer and is published to lend a helping hand to a new publication. Good luck to Dekenu Sheperd and his crew!

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Filed under Barbados, Island Life, Jamaica

Gunman Holds Hostages On Canadian Airliner In Jamaica

canjet-jamaica-hostage

UPDATED, Monday 8:06am: CBC.ca report: Incident Is Over – Hijacker in Custody, Canadian Crew Released: Jamaican Police

Our original story…

Airliner Crew Held Hostage – Shot Fired – Most Passengers Released

A gunman stormed a Canadian CanJet airliner on the ground at Sangster international Airport in Jamaica and is still holding a number of crew members hostage. The incident started Sunday night around 10 PM local time. News reports say the gunmen forced his way through security and charged the aircraft before authorities could respond. Dozens of passengers were briefly held hostage before being released. Although a shot was fired, there are no reports of injuries in the news stories.

There are conflicting reports that two passengers are still being held with the flight crew.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper is coincidentally in Jamaica for a one-day visit.

While the truth is, the situation could probably have happened just about anywhere — it didn’t. It happened in Jamaica, a country with one of the highest murder rates in the world and a gun culture that is even reflected in popular music. If any of our Canadian readers are thinking of a vacation in Jamaica, may we suggest you reconsider that Barbados is a much friendlier and safer vacation place.

For the latest on this story, Google “Jamaica airliner hostage” as we will not be updating this post for a few hours.

CBC.CA – Gunman holds Canadian plane, crew at airport in Jamaica

Sky News – Gunman Holds 7 Hostage In Jamaica

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Filed under Barbados