Tag Archives: Jamaica

Sheri Veronica – As school children in Barbados we were taught to hate Jamaicans

Sheri Veronica Barbados

“Respect Jamaicans”

by Sheri Veronica

THE TRUTH IS, we were taught to hate JAMAICANS.  As a little girl in primary school, our teacher taught us that Barbados was the jewel of the Caribbean.  We were taught that any mad/crazy slave or any slave who could not take instructions, were shipped off to Jamaica.  This was the mandate, I supposed in my little head (or was that taught to me also), of every Caribbean island.  Send the mad and **aggressive slaves to Jamaica.  Then as time passed and you start to see clearer, meet people and question things, you soon realize that the insurgent slaves were the brave ones.  They were the men and women who could not be broken…

… continue with a good read at Sheri Veronica’s blog

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Filed under Africa, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Jamaica, Race, Slavery, Sugar

Request for assistance in solving murder of Father Charles Brown

Where is murder suspect Rohan Deacon?

To the wonderful law abiding citizens of Jamaica… We the family members of the late Father Charles Brown would like to thank you for the kindness bestowed on us throughout our ordeal.

This coming July 24th will be one year since he was brutally taken away from doing the good work of helping the poor, downtrodden, the church and most of all his relatives.

We are asking if you could assist the diligent police officers who have been working relentlessly to locate the person of interest Rohan Deacon to no avail.

If anyone knows his whereabouts please contact Hunts Bay CIB 9237111, 9013121, 119 or Crime Stop at 311.

Thanks again for your outpouring of love and support have a bless day.

Barbados Free Press

Father Charles Brown Jamaica MurderDear People of Jamaica

We are the family of Father Charles Brown, lovingly known to many as ‘Uncle Charles’.

On the 24th July the senseless murder and loss of our beloved brother, uncle and servant of God, Father Charles Brown has sent ripples of pain and heartache across oceans and continents.

To us ‘Uncle Charles’ was a vibrant and funny man, he really loved a good joke, very understanding and adored animals, he devoted his life to the service of others, often sacrificing his own needs.

Uncle Charles was known to go without food or sleep in order to provide support and comfort to families in grief, to be a character witness for those facing the courts or to joyfully perform the baptism of a baby, welcoming them into the world with his kindness and warm smile.

He spent his life giving from his heart and we have had him…

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Filed under Crime & Law, Jamaica

Caribbean Court of Justice judgements cannot be enforced in Barbados!

CCJ can't make Barbados pay Shanique Myrie judgement

CCJ can’t make Barbados pay Shanique Myrie judgement

As an old friend used to say “IANAL” – “I am not a lawyer”

But if a judgement from the CCJ cannot be enforced, what’s the use? Isn’t the whole justice system a farce then? Why bother taking anything to the CCJ?

How does this impact foreign investors who might be interested in doing business in Barbados or other Caribbean nations?

Can someone please explain this to me. Why bother having a CCJ if the judges have no power?

CCJ lacks mechanism to enforce Shanique Myrie judgement, says judge

ST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC) – A judge with the Trinidad-based Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) Friday said there was no mechanism to enforce the judgement following the recent ruling in the case involving the Jamaican national Shanique Myrie.

Myrie successfully sued the Barbados Government after she was refused entry into the island in 2011. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Jamaica, Politics

BFP’s George: “I could just kiss Mac Fingall, but he wouldn’t like it – as cute as he is.”

Mac Fingall Queer Barbados

“THE WORLD IS NOW embroiled in discussion on homosexuality and same-sex marriage. It is a discussion that should be of concern to everyone for if allowed to dominate it could spell the end of mankind.”

Mac Fingall in The Nation article Abnormal behaviour

Gay Love and Hate in Barbados

by George (with Cliverton)

Mac Fingall says that mankind will end because of gay love. Mac and I don’t agree about that, although I do agree that he has a right to say whatever he wants to. If Mac wants to talk ’nuff foolishness an climb de tree higher so his bare bum show more, he should climb higher.

I could kiss Mac because his seriously foolish talk makes people re-think their attitudes and words of hate towards gays and lesbians. (Also I could kiss Mac because he is cute – maybe even a handsome devil. I mean, look at that smile!)

When people really think about what Mac is saying, and then seriously think about their own attitudes, I believe that people can and do change their minds. Mac’s newspaper column forced people to consider why they hate gays.

More and more people these days are coming to the realization that gays are not a threat to society: they are just people. Mac doesn’t like that people are re-considering their attitudes to gays and lesbians so he wrote a newspaper column. The attempts like Mac’s to dehumanize or stigmatize fellow human beings for the way they are is no different than when there were ‘coloured’ and ‘white’ washrooms.

God made Mac one way. God made other people another way. Mac says God made me wrong. According to Mac, God made me imperfect and abnormal.

Tell that to God, Mac. Tell that to God.

Mac… You want to know what happens when people don’t view gays as real human beings?

This happens:

Jamaica: Cross dressing teen killed by mob

Posted by NEWSROOM on 22/07/2013 at 7:42pm

A teenager was set upon by a mob and killed at a party in St. James overnight. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Jamaica

Jamaican drug smugglers plead “Guilty” in Barbados. The Devil responds…


The Devil went down to Jamaica

by Nevermind Kurt

I cannot imagine swallowing or shoving two pounds of herb into my body, driving to the airport in Jamaica, going through the whole check-in / security thing, waiting, boarding, flying and arriving in Bim. I don’t care how much they pay me, it’s not going to happen. I know how desperate some folks can be though, and I know how others take advantage of them – or force them – to do things they don’t really want to do.

The masterminds always walk free, but the little people do the time and pay the price.

Eight Jamaicans pleaded guilty today in Barbados court to smuggling ganja in their body cavities. The eight are part of the 30 or abouts passengers given a “close inspection” upon arrival at Grantley Adams Internationals Airport. They are about to do up to three years in Dodds Prison and that is no easy go – nevermind matter what some say.

Drug mules are the Privates. Who are the Generals?

Think about the logistics of stuffing twenty or thirty drug mules all at once and getting them onto an airplane bound for Barbados. Think about the recruitment. Think about the enemas the day before. Think about the pickup in Barbados and drug retrieval. Accommodation, meals, controls on movement, security. Flight back. Payment. Distribution. This was a big operation.

Good for the Bajan authorities who identified and arrested this lot – but where are the bosses? Where are the money men and organizers in Barbados? Why aren’t they being arrested?

Why no big-ups arrested? The answer is a no-brainer: the mules won’t talk because to do so would be to pronounce their own death sentence in Dodds.

Some folks say “Just herb, wat the harm?”

I don’t believe that herb is the problem. It’s the criminal system behind the herb that steps in because the drug is against the law. Like Chicago in the 1920’s – there wouldn’t have been any Al Capone without Prohibition of alcohol.

Was Peter Tosh right? “Nevermind. Legalize it”

Should we legalize it? That’s a big big question. I may have inhaled a bit of smoke myself in the past. I didn’t kill or rape anyone, so I can see that the problem is not the herb itself. It is the criminal activity that results from the illegality of grass. That’s my opinion and others at BFP (like Marcus and Robert) disagree on that most vehemently. “Vehemently” See? I can still pull out the $25 words when I think hard so I must have a few brain cells left. Robert’s Beefeater Gin is probably worse overall.

You know my name is Nevermind Kurt. Why “Nevermind”? Why “Kurt”? Why the photo of him with my name?

Nevermind. Now you know part of who I am, or rather, once was. 😉

Further Reading

The Gleaner, August 5, 2011: Jamaican Drug Mules Held In Barbados

RJR News: J’cans in Barbados sentenced after pleading guilty to drug charges

OUR THANKS: to BFP reader UB for suggesting the YouTube video!

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Jamaica, Police

Loveridge: Jamaica’s protectionism hurting Caribbean unity, tourism

PM Golding tilts the playing field against REDjet and Barbados

In the next 24 hours, some 6,000 people will read this article by Adrian Loveridge. We can only hope that Jamaica’s Prime Minister will be among them.

Has REDjet been treated fairly?

by Adrian Loveridge - small hotel owner

It’s a big question and without all the facts in hand it would be difficult to be totally objective.

However, if you ask the questions, is the concept of a low cost carrier desirable in the Caribbean and can it be made to work, then the answers have to be yes, and probably if they are allowed to operate in a truly commercial environment.

When you can book a week-long cruise that visits seven Caribbean islands with travel, accommodation and food all included for less than the cost of a return airline ticket to one of those territories, then something has to be fundamentally wrong.

LIAT now enjoys a virtual monopoly on certain routes out of Barbados, which includes Puerto Rico after the withdrawal of American Eagle.

According to their website, the cheapest return flights (a round trip of 1,140 miles) bookable in late June to San Juan is US$664.09, which includes a whopping US$176.09 in taxes and add-ons.

For exactly the same dates, return flights to New York with American Airlines cost US$615.50 (including US$177.50 in taxes) and US$664.80 (US$166.80 taxes) with JetBlue, a journey involving 4,182 miles or nearly four times farther both in miles and flying distance than Puerto Rico.

“If LIAT had competition on the San Juan route of course fares would be lower and that is why we need an airline like REDjet.”

REDjet has been criticised by some for having not having a viable business plan but does LIAT or the amalgamated Caribbean Airlines and Air Jamaica?

Without past massive taxpayer subsidies all three of these carriers would have perished by the wayside years ago and the much delayed partial assimilation of the ‘Lovebird’ by CAL has also been finally made possible only after the government of Jamaica wrote-off off huge debts.

And we have to remember that in its entire 42-year history, Air Jamaica recorded a profit in only one of them, 1986.

So when we talk about fairness, what do we really mean?

To the best of my knowledge the owners of REDJet have not asked any government for taxpayer bailouts, heavily subsidised fuel, preferential interest rates or any other major concessions. They just want to operate in a commercially level playing field where competition, supply and demand and all the other factors that in the ‘real world’ decide economic survival or failure.

The people of Jamaica now own a 16 percent stake of Caribbean Airlines and it has been designated that island’s national carrier to the world.

Clearly, Prime Minister Golding is keen to protect that interest and recently stated he was “not saying the REDjet application would not be approved, but it would have to be allowed with the CAL deal in mind”.

Perhaps he has every right to be so protective, but does it really foster better Caribbean unity or take us a step closer to marketing the region as one?

The writing is on the wall, the president of the Barbados Hotel and Tourism has already graphically warned that summer tourism business is down.

REDjet has clearly demonstrated that it can drive additional traffic to Guyana and there is no reason to believe it wouldn’t be the same for Trinidad and Kingston. This just may reduce the real risk of additional hotel closures and job losses this year.

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Jamaica

Jamaican Prime Minister alleges dirty tricks in Barbados airline war

PM Golding says Barbados “held up” Caribbean Airlines aircraft in “aggressive action”

The REDjet saga continues with the Jamaican Prime Minister accusing Barbados of harassing a Caribbean Airlines aircraft at Grantley Adams International Airport.

“What I’m told took place two days ago when a Caribbean Airlines plane was held up, I don’t want to use the word detained, in Barbados and the suspicion is that it is an aggressive action, and I hope it is not, because that is not the way we in Caricom should resolve our issues.”

PM Golding to The Gleaner: Red Jet Row Heightens

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Politics