Category Archives: Energy

Pat Hoyos: Plasma gasification will bring economic and environmental disaster to Barbados

“The Government of Barbados has given up all of the country’s future rights to determine its waste to energy management to an unknown company, whose plan is to build a plant using highly dangerous technology that has failed in every attempt made so far to turn garbage into electricity.”

Welcome to Corruption Unlimited

“Barbados has given up all future rights to an Unknown Company…”

Oh yes my childrens… Gather ’round and I’ll spin you a tale of how each Barbados government for the last 30 years has promised to implement integrity legislation and conflict of interest standards, but never did. Never will without serious international pressure.

Owen Arthur promised integrity legislation, but never delivered. Then, on a politician’s salary, PM Owen Arthur donated US$150,000 in after tax dollars to a cricket charity! What a great man!

Then “Goin’ wid Owen” was caught putting campaign donations from corporations into his personal bank account!

No charges though because Barbados doesn’t care about corruption.

PM Thompson Says His Use Of CLICO's Business Jet Is None Of Your Business

PM Thompson Says His Use Of CLICO’s Business Jet Is None Of Your Business

Then the next Prime Minister, David Thompson, through his law firm money laundered $3.3 Million Dollars for his friend Leroy Parris.

And David Thompson and the DLP promised Integrity Legislation.

But they never delivered.

Now Freundel Stuart says “Trust me, trust your government” about the garbage-to-electricity plant.

And Bajans are not allowed to know if any politicians have shares in the companies that will benefit from the Barbados Government contract. 

So… to all the Bajan politicians who aren’t standing up and demanding that the people be allowed to know who is profiting from government contracts… (Censored)

Take it away, Pat Hoyos…

THE HOYOS FILE: Tipping Cahill deal into the dumpster

YOU KNOW THAT A POLICY is dead on arrival when the usually accommodative local chamber of commerce breaks its silence to say so. That, to me, was the big game changer last week.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Energy, Environment, Ethics, Political Corruption, Politics & Corruption

Barbados Tourism Minister Richard Sealy on natural gas shortage – Hotels, businesses at fault for failing to plan for government’s failure to plan.

Barbados is paying the price for Prime Minister Stuart's wrong decisions and planning failures.

Barbados businesses and citizens are paying the price for Prime Minister Stuart’s wrong decisions, planning failures.

submitted by old todd

For the past four months – not “a few weeks” as said by The Nation newspaper – businesses, restaurants and hotels have been devastated by the failure of the Barbados Government to deliver sufficient natural gas. Every industry using natural gas has been impacted, right from biscuit maker WIBISCO that lost 60% production and 50% of export sales in December, to restaurants and hotels along the west and south coasts forced to close or suffer tourist cancellations.

Tourism Minister Richard Sealy says businesses should be ready for his government's failure to plan.

Tourism Minister Richard Sealy says businesses should be ready for his government’s failure to plan.

The harm to our tourism and manufacturing sectors will not be over when the shortage ends. It will take a year or more to regain the confidence of tourists and business customers who were directly impacted.

The government and the National Petroleum Corporation are portraying this as the failure of two wells – something that could not have been foreseen. What rot!

The truth is that Barbados has been running too close to the line for years, with known insufficient reserves and weaknesses in the distribution system. There was no surprise – this has been coming for years as predicted by industry pundits.

So now that the crisis is here, government is taking steps to import the machinery and perform repairs that should have been done years ago. That is only a stop-gap until new wells and natural gas imports can be arranged for.

And we have no money.

Government made decisions to withhold spending on distribution system maintenance and improvement. Government made decisions every year for the past seven to lower natural gas reserves and to sail closer to the disaster zone, counting on luck and hope that we would have enough gas to get through the busy tourist high season.

That was a decision and it was the wrong decision. Now the country is paying.

Further Reading

Barbados Today: Toppin: Deal with natural gas shortage

Nation News: Hoteliers told to get back-up energy

Nation News: Biscuit Blues

Advocate: PM: Efforts on to resolve natural gas shortage

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Business & Banking, Economy, Energy

Falling fuel prices no guarantee of increased tourism – Barbados must work smart and hard in a tough market

Barbados Grantley Airport Tarmac

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

Most of us, of course, warmly welcome the current fall in fuel prices which probably in the hospitality sector be demonstrated by the greatest savings in electricity prices, especially those properties who have extensive air conditioning units.

But almost needlessly to say, that Government will collect a lower level of taxes and VAT, so it’s a two edged sword.

I also wonder how long it will take our limited number of distribution companies to pass on the benefit of reduced delivery costs as a result of cheaper petrol and diesel prices. Assuming of course, they will pass on the benefits at all.

Experts in the aviation industry do not expect any dramatic reduction in airfares and again it may work initially against the consumer’s interest while used aircraft values rise as fuel falls, slowing down the delivery of newer most fuel-efficient aircraft in some cases.

Across our major tourism markets the halving of oil prices will hopefully give people more disposable income, perhaps most notably in the United Kingdom, where we have witnessed a recent significant fall in the value of Sterling against the US Dollar.

The Key to Success for Barbados tourism

Judging by the unprecedented level of email holiday bargains on offer in the UK I have tracked, there is absolutely no room for complacency this year and particularly in the more challenging softer summer months. Key to the success of this will be to portray the destination as offering real value-for-money. And I do not mean attempting to achieve the almost impossible objective by making everything cheaper, but ensuring that every product offering is as good as we can get it and going that extra mile to make visitors feel rightly special.  Continue reading

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Economy, Energy

Barbados natural gas shortage, tourist cancellations, difficult to hide in the Internet age

barbados natural gas shortage

“Just after midday yesterday several restaurants on the South and West Coast complained that their natural gas supply was completely gone. A few others who got a reduced capacity said they were able to prepare some meals, but at a diminished capacity. “  Nation News

Increasing calls and cancellations concern Barbados hotels as gas woes continue

Barbados Free Press has learnt that tourism and restaurant industry workers are starting to talk about calls and cancellations of bookings from foreign tourists concerned about online reports of the natural gas shortage and ruined vacations in Barbados. “Things are getting worse, not better, and the cancellations are starting because we can’t guarantee we’ll have hot water and full menus” one person wrote to BFP.

In late December and early January the Daily Mail, Yahoo! News, X-Factor News and others reported the natural gas shortage on the West Coast, and that his holiness Simon Cowell was inconvenienced by not being able to have his favourite sheppard’s pie at the Lone Star Restaurant. With that bit of celebrity news, the story spread on the internet.

So it is no surprise after almost three months of shortages, that TripAdvisor Barbados forums are all abuzz with tourist tales and concerns about spoiled vacations because of the ongoing gas shortage.

The natural gas shortage should be no surprise either to the Barbados government – at least to a competent government that realises how critical it is to our tourism based economy that restaurants, hotels and resorts have gas to cook and for hot water and laundry. It’s pretty basic, don’t you think?

Nation News – Natural gas shortage hits South Coast

Nation News – Gas woes from bad to worse

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Energy

Barbados natural gas stoppage: Government lapdog Nation newspaper blames hotels, restaurants, bakeries for “lack of business continuity planning”

Dog eats garbage

New Bajan tourism attraction: Dog eats garbage

by Passin Thru

In true Bajan and Caribbean “Island Time” style, a Nation newspaper editorial says that no one should be blamed or sacked for the disastrous stoppage of natural gas these past three weeks during the Christmas and New Years season.

The Nation says that those businesses, restaurants, hotels and other natural gas users are the problem. They foolishly didn’t have a backup plan and necessary technologies in place to prepare three meals a day for thousands of tourists for several weeks of outages.

Who wrote that editorial? Such foolishness from presumably an adult. They must be high on drugs or from another planet.

And what of the DLP Government’s failing to keep the gas flowing? Here’s what the suck-well Nation has to say about the government’s role in the crisis:

“The efforts of the Minister of Commerce, Donville Inniss, to personally interact with both the NPC and affected businesses, were very commendable.”

Fabulous! Government Minister Donville Pornville Inniss went about the place talking! What a fabulous job, Pornville, just fabulous!

Perhaps if Minister Inniss and his government paid the VAT refunds owed to business within say, a year of request, those businesses might be able to buy a gas grill or thirty to sit waiting “just in case” the government can’t deliver natural gas for a month in tourist high season? Should the hotels do the same with drinking water too? A month’s worth for 500 people?

Such foolishness.

And then there is the garbage problem… 

Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Business, Economy, Energy, Environment

Independence Day: Emera wants 100% of Barbados Light & Power

Four years after Emera Incorporated bought majority interest in Barbados Light and Power, we look back to our 2010 Independence Day article where we asked…

“Should we sell Barbados Light & Power to the Canadians?

Good for Barbados, or selling the family silver?”

All these years later… what do you think folks? Did we do the right thing selling BL&P to the Canadians?

Barbados Free Press

Should we sell Barbados Light & Power to the Canadians?

Good for Barbados, or selling the family silver?

by West Side Davie with Cliverton

Independence Day is a fitting time for Bajans to consider the difference between dreams and goals, and the difference between blind celebration and a grounded perspective on reality. For too long we have celebrated November 30th with much flag waving and remembrance of the heady days of the 1960’s – but little serious consideration given to where the good ship Barbados is sailing now and how the machinery is holding up.

We dance and sing about how we love the ship and what a good ship it is (and it is too!) – but I fear we’ve been putting off some needed maintenance and refitting because it’s easier and cheaper to slap on a coat of paint and say “It still looks good!”

Indeed, it could…

View original post 609 more words

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Filed under Barbados, Energy, History

Kick Starter staff picks new project by Permaculture Research Institute of Barbados

by Lorraine Ciarallo

The Permaculture Research Institute (CPRI) of Barbados has been in the making since 2012 and I am proud to finally announce that our project has started.

A couple days ago CPRI launched its KickStarter crowdfunding video campaign which I would like to share with you. The purpose of our project is to set up a permaculture school in Barbados to teach, educate and demonstrate through the principles of permaculture how to grow food, repair landscapes & build community. Permaculture is a design science, inspired by nature and guided by ethics. Its purpose is to meet the needs of humanity while benefiting the environment. To this end, it empowers individuals, local communities and the larger public to build sustainable & environmentally friendly:

  • Food and Land Systems
  • Social and community systems
  • Shelter and home systems
  • Livelihood and business systems

I hope you will take the time to watch the video. If this campaign is successful, it will help ensure the life of this project, a project which I am committed to for the next 3 years. It is super exciting for me to share it with you and I hope, you find it exciting too!  Continue reading

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Filed under Agriculture, Barbados, Energy, Environment

Energy & Environment: We cannot continue on the way we have been…

“At best, the age of cheap energy is over…”

Former energy Minister of Denmark

“You need to think of energy in a fifty-year timeframe, and our elected officials are thinking of energy in two year election cycles. That’s ridiculous!”

John Hofmeister, former Head U.S. Shell

One of our old friends sent us a link to the PBS video Earth: The Operators Manual / Powering the Planet – and what an interesting and well-done documentary it is. You can disagree with some of the program or with some of the technologies that are presented as solutions (as I disagree about large scale wind farms) – but you cannot disagree with the theme that we cannot continue on the way we have been. We cannot continue what we are doing. We must find better ways.

Where I disagree with some of the experts is in the area of self generation vs large scale energy generation. The current societal model is to have large central generating facilities – whatever the technology – and accept that over 50% of power generated will be lost during transmission. I say that smaller individual and local community power generation is not only viable, but cheaper and less prone to interruption.

This 1 hour program is well worth your time.

Thanks friend!

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Filed under Barbados, Economy, Energy, Environment

Electricity from ordinary sewage waste: Microbial Fuel Factory Cells

microbial fuel cell

Barbados should give MFC’s a look!

by Robert D. Lucas, Ph.D.
Food biotechnologist.

Recently there has been much talk about the diverse means available of obtaining energy from renewable sources (solar, wave, wind as-well-as bio-diesel/gas). However, no mention has been made locally of the use of microbial fuel/factory cells (MFC’s). MFC’s are devices that convert chemical energy into electrical energy as do batteries, via the use of micro-organisms.

Unlike batteries, MFC’s can sustain their output of electricity as long as the chemical input is maintained. Most bacteria are electrochemically inactive and cannot be used in MFC’s. Those bacteria which are capable of producing an electric current are called exoelectrogens. Exoelectrogens, when placed into a suitable medium, transfer electrons (negatively charged particles) to an electrode which has been inserted into the medium. This flow of electrons is facilitated by an active electron transport system, which carries electrons directly from the microbe’s respiratory system to the anode ((negatively charged electrode).

“MFC’s do not depend on sunlight to be able to function. There is no need to have storage facilities for storing electricity as is the case with solar energy.”

Continue reading

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Canadian alternative power expert tells Barbados: Free yourselves from the monopolists!

Wind-turbines-water

by Graham Findlay of 3G Energy

(left as a comment on BFP’s Wind Turbines at Lamberts, Barbados – How close is too close?)

I build wind farms in Canada, small community scale wind farms. We try to keep set-back distances above the provincial minimum of 550 meters. At 750 meters a resident nearby has to strain to hear the devices, no matter what the weather conditions. At 550 meters, only under certain weather conditions will the noise be heard and even then it’s at a very low decibel level. At 550 meters the noisiest turbines can achieve 40 db or less of sound pressure outside a residence.

Noise from gear-boxes? Ever heard of gearless turbines? Ultra-low sound pressure? The energy from these devices at that frequency cannot travel far. The main issue from low frequency sound is the extent to which a person is experiencing it in his/her normal surroundings. In an urban environment, it’s all around and nobody complains. It comes from traffic, restaurant ventilation, cooling fans, wind flow through and around building structures. It’s there and yet people don’t notice it. It seems disingenuous to attack wind turbines for this effect when the physics of the experience show it to be below known harmful thresholds.

The wind resource on Barbados is amazing. It’s too bad that community organizations are not yet organized to step forward and become energy activists, and therefore owners of power generation equipment. It’s very satisfying to members of an energy co-op when they see revenue flowing in every month. It’s a shame to leave energy generation to the monopolists. Wind and solar energy generation opportunities should be owned by anybody who is interested.

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Barbados should be into Butanol, not Ethanol, to power autos – but we lack the vision and leadership

distillery butanol

“It would appear that, only certain persons in this society are founts of knowledge and that their opinions and ideas are adhered to, even when they are talking on subjects outside their area of technical competence.”

by Robert D. Lucas, PH.D.

There was an article entitled “Deal to turn whisky ‘leftovers’ into bio-fuels for cars”, in a local newspaper of Wednesday 26th September 2012. The same news item was aired on the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) on Monday 24th September 2012. It was reported in paragraph five of the article that, ninety percent of the stuff which comes out of the distillery is not whisky. It is leftovers like daff and pot ales which are high in sugars. It is planned, as reported in the article, to utilize these leftovers for the manufacture of butanol (an alcohol) for use as a bio-fuel. I have some points and observations which I will now make.

In the past (letters to Advocate: 7th June, 1998; 31st July, 2002; 3rd August, 2004 and 18th May 2006) I have advocated that yeast by-products (which are a high quality source of protein) from rum manufacturing, be utilized in the manufacture of rations for livestock locally. As I pointed out then, alcohol is a toxic by-product of the metabolism of molasses by various strains of yeast Saccharomyces cervisisiae. Once a threshold level of alcohol is reached, the yeast die off; but considerable amounts of free molasses remain. The yeast can be separated and used as a source of high-protein input for animal rations. The cell-free extract can then be distilled to remove ethanol. The residual liquid can be fermented to obtain more alcohol. Alternatively, selective pressure can be used on S.cervisisiae, to obtain strains of yeasts with increased tolerance to ethanol. The same trait can be obtained using genetic engineering techniques, to obtain improve alcohol tolerance of yeasts.

Butanol beats Ethanol for vehicles!

In 2006, in a letter (“Ethanol not the only manufacturing solution”), I proposed that the alcohol of choice for use as a bio-fuel be butanol. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Energy, Environment, Science

Lani Edghill reports on the 6th Caribbean Environmental Forum

Report on the 6th Caribbean Environmental Forum St Kitts and Nevis

May 21 – 25, 2012

by Ms. Lani Edghill
Programme Coordinator
Green Business Barbados
An initiative of The Future Centre Trust

May 22, 2012

The working days of the Caribbean Environment Forum (CEF) started off with a bang at the St. Kitts Marriott Resort and the Royal Beach Casino. The focus of the Forum was The Green Economy: Challenges and Opportunities in Managing Health, Water, Waste, Land, Energy, Climate Change and our Natural Resources. Key note addresses were delivered by a number of Government Ministers including those from St. Kitts and Nevis, Barbados and St. Lucia. Minister of Public Works, Housing, Energy and Utilities, for St Kitts and Nevis, Dr. The Honourable Earl Asim Martin, blazed the trail by highlighting their existing geothermal plant in Nevis and future plans for Geothermal plants of 10 megawatts each for St. Kitts and Nevis. In addition to this renewable energy source, a wind farm exists on Nevis producing 6 megawatts with a similar one on St. Kitts in the process of being built which will produce 5.2 megawatts of power. These plants will assist in moving St. Kitts and Nevis closer to their goal of producing 60% renewable energy for the country by 2015. This process was heavily informed by the public through public consultation and town hall meetings.

The Minister of Environment and Drainage for Barbados, Dr The Honourable Denis Lowe, featured the country’s Green Economy Scoping Study and made reference to the planned ‘Green Energy Complex’ for Barbados. Minister of Agriculture for Guyana, Dr. The Honourable Leslie Ramsammy, discussed the need to implement sustainable agriculture practices including integrated pest management (IPM) and stressed the need for a regional sound GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) framework for CARICOM. Dr. Didacus Jules, Registrar for the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC), provided the educational perspective explaining how the CXC is working toward integrating green skills into the Caribbean curriculum.

Day Two of the forum also saw the exhibition in full force, with resources and information available on waste water treatment, water harvesting systems, data on marine litter, etc. Embracing the Green Revolution is POUI (Protecting Our Universal Investment), a company based in Trinidad and Tobago, who provides clothing options made from recycled PET bottles, pens, stickers, reusable bags and other sustainable products and services. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Energy, Environment

Would the ZENN Car have worked for Barbados? We think so!

UPDATED: March 20, 2013

We were intrigued with the little ZENN electric car a year ago when we came across this video. The car is out of production because Canada and many US states won’t let light-weight minimal transportation on the roads.

ZENN isn’t dead though – it raised two million dollars for EEStor technology that is all about using a capacitor instead of a battery to power electric autos. You can read about ZENN autos and EEStor on Wikipedia and at ZENN’s website. The video if fun and worth your time…

ZENN Motor Company made about six hundred of these little electric vehicles in Quebec Canada before the production stopped in 2010. With a range of only 40 miles and a top speed that was artificially limited to 25 mph, the vehicle didn’t sell well enough to enter big time production. There were also legal issues that prevented the vehicle from being operated on highways in Canada.

Nonetheless, with a cost of only $12,000 Canadian and the ability to charge overnight from an ordinary household electrical outlet, the vehicle might have worked well in urban areas… or in Barbados. Think about how much you actually drive each day, how narrow our roads are, and that you could plug into an outlet at work or home. Zero emissions, no noise, little maintenance required and it’s not like I’m commuting 100 miles to and from downtown Manhattan every day.

Yup. The ZENN would have worked just fine for me in Barbados.

Thanks to an old friend who sent us the video and says “We could do with 10,000 of THESE coming into the Bridgetown Port right now!”

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Should you turn off the lights for Earth Hour? An environmentalist talks about his doubts.

Well-intentioned people produced some of history’s worst environmental disasters

by Nevermind Kurt

Hundreds of millions of people around the world will be switching off the lights at 8:30pm tonight (March 31st) and we will too. It’s time again for ‘Earth Hour’ – the largest environmental event in history. Last year over 5,200 cities and towns in 135 countries participated, and that included a home near Grape Hall, Barbados where yours truly and a few friends sat outside in the dark and sipped cold Banks beer from the electrically-powered refrigerator still humming away in the house.

Luckily the petroleum-based paraffin wax candle burning on the kitchen table didn’t set fire to anything. To be truthful, we never thought about how the smoke from the candle impacted the ozone layer. We saw the candle as a symbol that we were doing our bit for the world.

We felt good about our little Earth Hour party. We were doing something important to help the environment. It was good for the environment, wasn’t it? It did help forward the environmental movement around the globe… didn’t it?

This year though we’re going to do something a little different: we’re going to talk about whether Earth Hour does any harm to the environment or to the environmental movement, and if so, what lessons can be learned and what should be done about it.

I can already hear the angry shouts from fellow environmentalists “How could Earth Hour possibly harm the environment? How could it harm the environmental movement?”

Calm down, friends. Unless you’ve thought about my questions before, why do you think you immediately know the answers? Why do you react so defensively when someone dares to deconstruct what you believe or asks you to verify that which you hold as environmental truth?

When science and common sense yield to shouted dogma

Shouldn’t we constantly question ourselves, our peers and the environmental elites and leadership? Why the defensive, dare I say almost religious indignation when someone dares to question the environmental dogma of the day? Where does this precious environmental dogma originate… from the environmental gods and saints? Is it therefore never to be challenged?

The environmental experts, gods and saints haven’t done so well lately. They have been wrong on more than a few occasions. Like all human beings they are sometimes wrong as individuals and not infrequently they act like a herd of lemmings headed for the proverbial cliff. Continue reading

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LED Lighting: Cost effective? We’re going to try it…

Jim Reid of Caribbean LED Lighting Inc. says that LED lamps can save up to 80% on electricity, are safe, environmentally friendly and don’t spread mercury and all those other nasty chemicals like the florescent bulbs do when they break.

Okay, Jim… we’ll give your product a try and report back to our readers in a few months.

Caribbean LED Lighting Inc.

Caribbean LED Lighting Inc (CLL) was born out of a passion for all things environmental, reducing our carbon footprint and helping our Customers do the same. That is why we focused on LED lighting.

Headquartered in Barbados and with distribution locations in Grand Cayman, Jamaica , St Kitts and Grenada we manufacture, assemble, distribute and sell LED lighting across the Caribbean and Central America’s.

Phone: 246-621-0092

e-mail: sales@caribbeanledlighting.com

www.caribbeanledlighting.com

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Filed under Barbados, Energy, Environment

Smart Meters are Surveillance Devices – Data already used by police

In today’s “things I never thought of before” department, our old friend “H” sends the above video to BFP. After watching it twice I had to think whether or not I care that the authorities could access the smart meter data and gain a window into my boring life.

After a bit of thought, my answer is “Yes. I do care.”

No smart meter for me, thanks!

Cliverton

Here’s the letter that the chap talks about in the video… Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Consumer Issues, Energy, Human Rights

We got another loan! Adds another US$100 million dollars for our children to pay

Break out the champagne again, friends

They say this new US$70 million Inter-American Development Bank loan (plus interest) will enable Barbados to cut our energy costs by $600 million over the 20 year term. Wonderful.

Of course, the projected savings are based upon the “fact” that Bajans will cut electricity consumption by 19 percent within the next 17 years – and the “fact” that by the time those 17 years pass, almost 30 percent of our energy will come from “renewable sources such as photovoltaic, solar water heating, wind, biomass cogeneration, and waste-to-energy projects…”

As per usual, the loan has no performance monitoring built into it. That means that our glorious leaders will (as per usual) be able to “temporarily” divert loan monies to other uses at their discretion when the solar projects are “held up” for a while. This has happened before – the West Coast sewer project has been “held up” for a decade now so the government is using the gazillion dollar loan on other things…

… Like tossing the money into general revenues where it disappears faster than Noel Lynch when asked how he became a millionaire on a politician’s salary. Gone!

What is the money supposed to be used for WHAT? !!!

Wake up children… the press release gives the impression that the loan will be used to purchase windmills, power generators and build waste-to power plants etc etc etc.

That’s what the press release implies. HOWEVER if you read the actual project notes you’ll see that this batch of money will go to…

“(i) support the formulation of policy and legislation that will contribute to the promotion of Renewable Energy (RE), Energy Efficiency (EE), Energy Conservation (EC), and rational and efficient use of fossil fuels, and as a consequence, promote the mitigation of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions as well as initiatives for adaptation to climate change in the energy sector; and

(ii) support institutional strengthening, public education and awareness and capacity building to promote sustainable energy and EC initiatives.”

Read it again.

And again.

Now… can you see what is happening my friends?

The only tangible item you’ll see for this money is when the Ministry of the Environment hands out more colouring books to the children.

At the end of spending this money, what will we have to show ourselves and our children when they ask?

What does Barbados have to show for the billions in loans?

How much do we owe in overall debt? When is the debt due? How much is the interest per year to service our existing debt? What did we achieve for the debt?

Pretty simple questions, but try to get a straight answer. There were rumours that our Barbados governments have shown much of the normal spending as asset purchases. I guess the politicians learned that one from Leroy Parris and CLICO. You can do magic things when you simply assign whatever value you want to an asset.

Also don’t forget that we switched to an accrual system of accounting a few years ago. For the elites that was definitely a once in a lifetime opportunity and don’t you doubt that they took full advantage of manna from Heaven on that one.

The “benefits” of this latest IDB loan are as solid as a wispy cloud in the blue Caribbean sky. You can see it, but can’t touch it. And when you take your eyes off it for a moment, it’s gone.

Such are the “benefits” that Bajans will see for their US$100 million (including interest).

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Filed under Barbados, Consumer Issues, Economy, Energy, Environment

Prime Minister Owen Arthur “invested” YOUR money in Nigeria. A predictable result.

Millions stolen with not one solar water heater made

by RLL

The short story: In 2006, your BLP Owen Arthur government “invested” $2.4 million dollars into a Nigerian solar water heater project. The Nigerian factory was never finished, not one water heater was made and your money is gone.

Question #1: Nigeria? What was Arthur thinking?

Question #2: For all the BLP “joint business ventures”, name one that was truly successful as a business.

There is the BLP hype about Owen Arthur being a brilliant economist, and then there is the reality. Owen Arthur borrowed 2.4 million dollars in your name, loaned it threw it away in Nigeria on a project that any drunk (except our drunk) knew would fail – and now you and your children have to pay.

Not one job was created in Barbados or Nigeria, and your money is not only gone – it is untraceably gone. There was no accountability built into the project to ensure that the money “invested” on behalf of Barbados taxpayers was used as intended.

Your government “invested” $2.4 million dollars of your money in Nigeria, one of the most corrupt countries in the world. What did they think would happen?

Who took the money?

Nigeria. Joint business venture with our tax dollars. Everybody knew what was going to happen.

Owen Arthur is truly an idiot… or… did he or anyone else in government have a piece of the action as a shareholder, supplier or consultant?

Somebody in your government probably made a quick five or ten percent on your lost $2.4 million.

Without transparency and accountability laws, we’ll never know. In any event, conflicts of interest like that are not illegal in Barbados. Your government officials are free to take kickbacks consultancy and supplier positions with companies that benefit from government grants, loans and contracts.

Compared to some of the past hits, the Nigerian solar water heater scam was a relatively small loss, but it perfectly illustrates why our country is on a downward slope without integrity, transparency and accountability laws. Once in power, the politician piggies have a field day and there is nothing that can be done.

Further Reading

You should read the news article at Barbados Today: Water heater write-off, but we’ll reprint the entire article here because the Bajan news media often removes or modifies news stories to change history and the BT gang did that when they worked at The Nation. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Energy, Freedom Of Information, Nigeria