Tag Archives: History

40 years ago Barbados teenager Marcia Rollins went to England to become a nurse

Black Caribbean nurses made a huge difference in England’s National Health Service

Marcia Rollins is from Barbados. She always wanted to be a nurse but opportunities were limited on the island so when the UK needed new recruits she joined thousands of other Caribbean people and left for the ‘mother country’.

“It was always my dream to be a nurse. England was seen as the mother country and there were opportunities in England moreso than here in Barbados to do nursing.

I was terrified but full of hope for the future…

My plans were to go there and study nursing and get back to Barbados as fast as I could.”

Marcia was just 19 when she arrived in England and intended to return to Barbados soon after her training finished. She actually ended up spending 40 years in the NHS making a unique and valuable contribution as a Registered Nurse and gaining a diploma in health care. She retired in 2008 and moved back to Barbados.

“It was always my dream to be a nurse. England was seen as the mother country and there were opportunities in England moreso than here in Barbados to do nursing.

I was terrified by full of hope for the future…

My plans were to go there and study nursing and get back to Barbados as fast as I could.

You had things that weren’t very nice – Get back to the Jungle. Take your black hands off me. Things like that were said to you. To be quite honest, I didn’t let things like that bother me…”

Then I had a family… two small children and going back to Barbados was a far dream. I have no regrets. I consider England to be a University of Life.”

Read the entire story at Black Union Jack

Also from the same era, see BFP’s Bajan Ralph Straker passes in the UK – One of thousands recruited from the Caribbean by London Transport in the 1950s

 

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Immigration, Race

Sheri Veronica – As school children in Barbados we were taught to hate Jamaicans

Sheri Veronica Barbados

“Respect Jamaicans”

by Sheri Veronica

THE TRUTH IS, we were taught to hate JAMAICANS.  As a little girl in primary school, our teacher taught us that Barbados was the jewel of the Caribbean.  We were taught that any mad/crazy slave or any slave who could not take instructions, were shipped off to Jamaica.  This was the mandate, I supposed in my little head (or was that taught to me also), of every Caribbean island.  Send the mad and **aggressive slaves to Jamaica.  Then as time passed and you start to see clearer, meet people and question things, you soon realize that the insurgent slaves were the brave ones.  They were the men and women who could not be broken…

… continue with a good read at Sheri Veronica’s blog

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Filed under Africa, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Jamaica, Race, Slavery, Sugar

Reader asks for assistance in planning a Barbados Red Legs tour

Barbados Red Legs

Dear Barbados Free Press

I will be coming to Barbados in February, 2015. I’ve always wanted to visit as I have an interest in the Red Leg people and the history of the Irish who were sent to Barbados by Oliver Cromwell.  I hope to take back a tour group with me in 2016 to show them the island with particular emphasis on its Irish history. I’m wondering if there are any locations that I could visit that might have some connection with this history and with the descendants of the Red Legs.

(Name withheld by editor)

AN ESTIMATED 50,000 “white slaves” were transported from Ireland to Barbados between 1652 and 1657. Having succeeded in recruiting Irish men to die in the services of France, Spain, Poland and Italy, Cromwell turned his attention to others – men and women press-ganged by soldiers, taken to Cork and shipped to Bristol where they were sold as slaves and transported to Barbados.

… see BFP’s article Irish Times: Most Barbados Red Legs have bad or no teeth.

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, History, Slavery

Battle of Broken Hill: 100 years since the first jihadist terror attack in Australia

Alma Cowie, Katrina Dawson (r): murdered in Australia by foreign jihadists 100 years apart

Alma Cowie, Katrina Dawson (r): murdered in Australia by Muslim jihadists 100 years apart

One hundred years ago, January 1, 2915, two Muslim immigrants to Australia launched jihad attacks on a Sunday excursion train, killing four and wounding several others before being killed by police, in what became known as the Battle of Broken Hill.

On December 15, 2014, a Muslim cleric took hostages at gunpoint in a Sydney Australia cafe and held up an ISIS terror flag in the window. Thanks to Sheikyermami.com for the photos of the two victims one hundred years apart.

The list of murders to please Allah (P.BUH) between those two dates is impressive, and surely must be pleasing to the Muslim prophet who himself loved to behead, rape and enslave infidels – and instructed that his followers do the same.

The Holy Koran instructs all good Muslims to commit acts of violence to spread the religion and political system called Islam.

So that’s exactly what followers are doing.

Any questions?

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Filed under Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Religion

Looking ahead to Barbados 50th Independence Celebration

barbados wave flag

In plenty and in time of need…

For all our current economic problems and the failures of a corrupt political class to provide principled, unselfish leadership over the decades, Barbados on our 48th National Independence Day is still a country and a society to be envied.

Millions of people from countries around the world would get down on their knees and thank God if they were blessed enough to have had their navel string buried in Bajan soil. Stand still anywhere on this island for ten minutes and take it all in: even inner B’town’s worst is only a short walk from the salt water and beauty.

And isn’t that the truth? No matter where you are in Barbados you are only a minute or two from beauty the likes of which people from other countries spend thousands of dollars to see and experience for a few days.

The beauty of these fields and hills though, is nothing compared with the beauty of our people, our children and the ordinary folk who give Bim its character and reality.

It is true that we should be worried about the excesses of celebration for lowered achievements and about some of the youth whose activities could not be more ‘un-Bajan’ – but despite these things, can you not ask for assistance from a stranger on this island and still receive a helping hand? Of course you can!

Try that in New Jersey, or Soho. Been there, “have the t-shirt” as they say.

We naturally focus upon the decades, and our 48th anniversary is an uninspiring number compared to our 45th or our 40th. Remember our 30th? Remember the rains and no one cared? Soaked or not the party went on for three days. A bit different from these last two days, yes?

Admittedly things back then looked a bit brighter economically, but it was more than that: the mood was about us as a nation, about our wonderfully rosy future. About us as a people.

A short two years from now and we will be facing our 50th year as an independent, fully sovereign nation.

The question we should be asking ourselves now is not “How shall we celebrate our 50th?”, but “What do we want Barbados to be on our 50th, and what should we do to reach that goal?”

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Filed under Barbados, History

Wycliffe Hall Oxford University looking for a portrait of Lodge School principal Harry Beaujon Gooding

Oxford Wycliffe Hall

Dear Barbados Free Press,

I am Clerk of Works at Wycliffe Hall, a theological college, part of Oxford University, England.

I am undertaking a project to have all our former principals portraits hung in our main foyer. I have been unable to locate any portrait of Harry Beaujon Gooding who I believe was a former principal at the Lodge School, Barbados.

I have been unable to contact the Lodge School, and would appreciate assistance.

Kind regards

Phil

Phil Chapman
Clerk of Works
Wycliffe Hall
52-54 Banbury Road
Oxford
OX2 6PW
Tel: 01865 274219
E-mail: maintenance (AT) wycliffe.ox.ac.uk

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Filed under Barbados, Education, History

Sam Lord’s Castle – A request for information about George Cunningham Cook, died in 1928

George Cunningham Cook. (1871-1928) Commander Royal Canadian Navy, Superintendent and representative of a the Canadian Government Merchant Marine (CGMM) in Barbados.

by Jonathan Bryan

Unfortunately, I never knew of Sam Lord’s Castle until this year, four years after it became a camp fire and opportunity to make s’more’s or charcoaled hot dogs. The pictures are amazing. The Castle must have been quite the experience in first person, and I can’t help but feel empty for what could have been. Reading the comments of many about their visit is inspiring for me though…….but you might ask yourself, why do I have any feelings for the place at all?

Well, besides being a lover of the historical, I am a genealogy researcher, live in Virginia, USA, and through my research, have been introduced to the former edifice. My wife’s had a ‘cousin’ who passed away while living in the Castle on November 21, 1928. Was he renting or owner? I’m not sure, not having access to deed information. If he owned it, what happened after he died? This cousin was George Cunningham Cook. He was a Commander in the Royal Canadian Navy, a Superintendent and representative of a the Canadian Government Merchant Marine (CGMM) in Barbados. He would often travel from Halifax, NS, Montreal, Que, and St Phillip, Barbados. Sadly, he died young due to complications of an explosion on board a steamship a few months later. He was 57, leaving a wife, Lilly, and son, George Elliott Cook (born 1901).

When George C. Cook passed away, he was buried next to Lord family tomb. That further leads me to think he may have been owner of Lord’s Castle at the time of his death. His headstone is located in St Phillips Parish Church cemetery. I don’t know where Lord’s tomb is, but would love to have a photo of George’s stone and any family buried with him.

Would anyone mind looking into Mr. Cook there in Barbados? Any photo’s and info could be posted here.

I must give credit to a fellow researcher, Patricia Lumsden, who provided much of the info I’ve shared.

(BFP Editor’s note: see book “Cook Descendants – Inlaws and Outlaws” by Patricia Lumsden)

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Filed under Barbados, History