Category Archives: Culture & Race Issues

Internet pornography kills love, warps young minds and sustains slavery.

Donville Inniss associated website: Pregnant women porn at Orgasm.com

Government Minister Donville Inniss associated website: Pregnant women porn at Orgasm.com …CLICK PHOTO FOR DETAILS AND STORY…

by Grenville Phillips II

by Grenville Phillips II

Pornography is now easily available to all school children who have access to a tablet or a smart phone.  It is facilitated by persons who allow unrestricted access to the Internet in their homes or at the many Wi-Fi hotspots around Barbados.  So let me share a solution; but first, let me describe the problem.

Pornography has two main damaging effects.  The impact for viewers is that that they can primarily view sexual intercourse as a means to satisfy themselves rather than satisfying their partners.  For male viewers, this can lead to a less satisfying sexual experience for her and a boring routine for him.  He will likely develop an uncaring attitude towards her if she does not express a similar delight in his sexual performance as those whom he watches.  His sexual experience should be all about satisfying her, and her sexual experience should be all about satisfying him.

The most damaging impact is on the victims whom the watchers are viewing.  Many women, especially from Asian and eastern European countries, are forced into the sex slave trade, with harsh consequences if they do not show delight when raped (See ‘Half the Sky’ and other research into sex slavery).  As the watchers view these victims, they are supporting and sustaining this slavery.  If people choose not to pay to view pornography on the Internet, then they still support and sustain the sex slave trade by adding to the web sites’ page views, which increases their potential advertising revenues.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Ethics, Government, Human Rights, Politics & Corruption, Slavery

Nation News ‘Dear Christine’ advises woman to commit paternity fraud

paternity fraud barbados

“it will not be in your best interest, >>> for you to bring this matter to the fore at this stage.”

A married woman is preggers and doesn’t know if her husband or some bloke at the office is the father. “Dear Christine” in The Nation advises the woman to keep her yob shut because it is not in her best interest to tell her husband.

It’s called PATERNITY FRAUD and women do it to men all the time. Once the man starts paying for the child it is usually too late to reverse the responsibility even if the man was tricked into believing it was his child.

Paternity Fraud has been called ‘The Perfect Crime

Do you love your wife? Good. Is she having a baby? Good.

At the first opportunity make sure you quietly take a DNA swab when no one is looking and send it away for testing to see if the child is really yours. Better to know right away for a whole lot of reasons.

Just do it.

Further Reading

Wikipedia: Paternity Fraud

Daily Mail: Another paternity fraud victim reveals how he was deceived.

PaternityFraud.com

30 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights

Caribbean Court of Justice judgements cannot be enforced in Barbados!

CCJ can't make Barbados pay Shanique Myrie judgement

CCJ can’t make Barbados pay Shanique Myrie judgement

As an old friend used to say “IANAL” – “I am not a lawyer”

But if a judgement from the CCJ cannot be enforced, what’s the use? Isn’t the whole justice system a farce then? Why bother taking anything to the CCJ?

How does this impact foreign investors who might be interested in doing business in Barbados or other Caribbean nations?

Can someone please explain this to me. Why bother having a CCJ if the judges have no power?

CCJ lacks mechanism to enforce Shanique Myrie judgement, says judge

ST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC) – A judge with the Trinidad-based Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) Friday said there was no mechanism to enforce the judgement following the recent ruling in the case involving the Jamaican national Shanique Myrie.

Myrie successfully sued the Barbados Government after she was refused entry into the island in 2011. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Jamaica, Politics

Marriage problems? Try a Maldives vacation where it’s lawful to beat and rape your wife!

maldives wife rape

Having a little problem with the wife not getting cuddly when you want to?

A vacation in the Maldives might be just the thing for your ailing marriage!

A Message from the Tourism Bureau of The Maldives

We’re The Maldives – your ultimate tropical paradise vacation destination. 1,192 tiny coral islands known for their peaceful and exquisite ‘back to nature’ environment.

Swim in our warm azure waters. Walk on pure crystalline white sands as leaning palms provide shade and beauty. Relax in a tranquil setting on any one of our pristine out islands where the Islamic riots don’t usually happen. And, if we ever open our museum again, you can see the finest headless statues in the world. Such art!

Maldivian President Abdulla Yameen has refused to ratify a bill that seeks to partially criminalize marital rape, calling it “un-Islamic.”

The parliament voted 67-2 last month to limit a husband’s right to have non-consensual sex with his wife. The bill says a husband cannot force his wife to have sex if the couple have filed for divorce, dissolution or mutual separation, and if the intent is to transmit a sexual disease.

President Yameen refused to ratify that law because it is “un-Islamic.”

Go swimming – you don’t really need a Maldives massage anyway. That’s why we shut down hundreds of resort spas.

No need to bring your Bible or rosary – why not just enjoy a week or two without your filthy Christian religion?

Celebrate our patriarchal Islamic culture where the most beautiful women are property to be married off so long as they have attained the ripe old age of nine.

And later when the day is done and you are a man feeling a little out of sorts, or needing some comfort from your wife: don’t be afraid to assert what is your lawful right over your own property.

It’s a man’s world here in The Maldives – and the women had better not forget that if they know what’s good for them.

Sometimes women need to be disciplined. That’s why our President Abdulla Yameen just vetoed a bill that limited a husband’s right to non-consensual sex. “Non-consensual sex” is so much better than the word “rape”, don’t you think?

With the elimination of the law protecting a wife from forced sex, (even if the husband has venereal disease), the future is assured: The Maldives will remain a man’s world. Continue reading

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Filed under Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Religion

Disposable Dads reminded to keep paying whether working or not

crying-son-fathers

“The kind of wife and mother for your child that you should be seeking will not be found rubbing crotches together on the road at Cropover…

Unfortunately that eliminates 90% of young Bajan women.”

by The Man with no Future

Hear me, oh young men!

For the life of me I don’t know why any man would want to father a child these days, let alone get married.

Look at the hundreds of poor dumb “fathers in name only” the Barbados government is making redundant in the mass-firings. Government kicking them in the ass on the way out: reminding them to Keep Paying. Nevermind they have no job, no money and no prospect of finding new work on this dying island. The message is “Keep paying the woman you made pregnant, fool.”

You want slavery for all of your prime working years?

Father a child.

father sons blackYou want to put your future, the next 20 years in the hands of a woman who could turn on you at any time, kick you out of the home you paid for, take 75% of your earnings with no end in sight?

Just because she feels like it and the rules are set up to enslave men?

Father a child.

You want to cry and beg every week to see your son and have access used as a weapon against you? You want your son constantly told that you are no good? You want to have your son lied to and told you didn’t pick him up because you don’t love him?

Father a child.  Continue reading

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Filed under Abortion, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights

University of the West Indies student asks for Words of Inspiration

cave-hill-barbados-uwi

Dear Barbados Free Press,

I’m a struggling 21yr old. I read your blog daily and I’m intrigued, yet saddened, by the amount of bullshit we, Barbadians deal with.

I believe more so than ever that the approach to economic stability isn’t through traditional policy but through a reinvigorated industry…of sorts.

I’m a student at the [soon-to-be] defunct University of the West Indies.

Quite literally, I find no solace in the idea of investing so much resources in a degree from the institution. As a young person, I believe that I need to go against the norm in order to sustain a comfortable living on this island.

I think I’m going well so far but I seek to challenge the diverse faculties of your readership.

How do I maintain a good thing without fucking it up?

James (last name withheld by BFP)

BFP’s Robert replies:

Dear James,

I am hardly the person you should be asking for advice, but Marcus is gone somewhere better and Cliverton is probably still hungover at 2pm, so I am the one who opened your email. Continue reading

15 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy

“Cumba” – the story of one slave woman owned by Captain John Burch, Christ Church. From Africa to Barbados to England

slavery-barbados.jpg

“Mr. Maverick was desirous to have a breed of Negroes, and therefore seeing she would not yield by perswasions to company with a Negro young man he had in his house…”

… from John Josselyn as recounted in Two Voyages to New England, published 1674

One story of millions

by West Side Davie

“Cumba” was her name. She died a slave in Romford, England in April, 1668 – the property of John Burch and his wife Margaret of Hogsty Plantation. (I’m not sure whether Captain John Burch of Barbados is also referred to and is the same as Colonel John Burch of Barbados, but this family history and other websites seem to say it is the same man. I remain open for correction!)

Today, Cumba is remembered as Havering’s first black resident in an excellent article by Professor Ged Martin just published in the Romford Recorder:

It was 350 years ago this year that a fabulously rich couple, John and Margaret Burch, arrived in Romford.

They’d made their money in Barbados, exploiting slave labour to produce the bonanza crop: sugar.

In 1664, they retired to England, buying Romford’s biggest estate, Gidea Hall, then usually called Giddy Hall. The mansion, demolished in 1930, stood just east of Raphael Park.

Madam Burch, as she was fawningly called, brought her personal maidservant from Barbados, the ultimate status symbol.

Cumba was Havering’s first black resident. A slave, a piece of property, Cumba survived the English climate just four years.

But when she died, in April 1668, somebody had the humanity to record her name in the register of Romford’s St Edward’s church. “Cumber, a ffemale Blackamore servant from Guyddy Hall, buried.”

Today, “blackamore” is an offensive term. But in 1668, when “black” was used to ­describe complexion, it was an attempt to identify Cumba with some dignity. The double “ff” ­indicated a capital letter.

… read the entire article Cumba: Havering’s first black resident remembered on the 350th anniversary of her arrival.

We know very little about Cumba, but we still know far more about her than we do about millions of other people who were enslaved with her and since. We know about the times in which she lived, and we also know a little about the socially-condoned cruelty of slave owners. I believe that much of history has been ‘cleansed’, but not all of it. What passed for ‘normal’ and ‘acceptable’ when Cumba lived gives us some idea of her personal circumstances, what she probably saw even if she was not herself subject to all of the abuses. We simply don’t know the details of her life, but we know the times.

So to learn more about Cumba, we will talk of the people around her: the powerful elites of society at the time… Continue reading

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Filed under Africa, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Human Rights, Race, Slavery

How Sir Ronald Sanders swayed Caribbean support for Britain during the Falklands War

caricom-barbados-ronald-sanders.jpgSue Onslow of the University of London interviewed Sir Ronald Sanders as part of the Commonwealth Oral History Project. The entire interview available to read online at Commonwealth Oral Histories, or you can download the PDF at the bottom of this post.

Sir Ronald was a diplomat starting in the 1980′s and was part of the Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group reporting in 2011. The first Eminent Persons Group included Barbados future Governor General, Dame Nita Barrow, who famously dressed in African garb to sneak into Soweto in South Africa and also met with Nelson Mandella in jail.

The interview covers a wide range of topics where Sir Ronald gives the perspective of someone right in the middle of the chaos that is international politics. Topics include South Africa (people, politics and apartheid), the US invasion of Grenada, the Falklands War and stories and opinions about famous people including then Barbados Prime Minister Tom Adams and lessor public figures like Reagan and Castro. ;-)

It’s a good read for anyone interested in history or politics.

Here’s a passage about how the Caribbean had decided to side with Argentina in the Falklands, but then Sir Ronald decided to convince the leaders that our collective interests favoured the UK…   Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, CARICOM, Culture & Race Issues, Grenada, Human Rights, Politics

International Press Institute calls for Barbados to allow newspapers to publish child pornography

International_Press_Institute

Well… that’s exactly what  IPI executive director Alison Bethel McKenzie is calling for.

Same with the Association of Caribbean Mediaworkers.

For background, see BFP’s Barbados Nation News publishes child porn in quest for sales

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Freedom Of The Press

“Better to be poor and in control of my own life”

A few wonderful pieces from our old friend Ian Bourne at The Bajan Reporter.

That man has a nose for news and a belly for a story. A pity he’s not in charge of CBC’s news department…

“Your Condo does not impress me much!”

Money dictates the quality of life that you live, and without money you cannot survive: that in itself is a true statement. Unfortunately, a lot of times we make less money -even though we might do the same quality, and quantity of work as a man in the workplace.

This then leads you to perhaps marry for stability, to ensure that you will live comfortably. Money does not make you happy, so don’t ever throw in the towel and settle with a man just because he is financially stable. Great if you find, and love someone who is wealthy and you two have decided to make a life together. However, succumbing to fear and marrying for money while you stare at your dwindling bank account is not the answer.

Read the entire article at The Bajan Reporter: Your Condo does not impress me much!

Dido elizabeth belle

Belle – Illegitimate mixed race daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral

Based on a true story, Belle follows the story of an Dido Elizebeth Belle, the illegitimate mixed race daughter of Royal Navy Admiral Sir John Lindsay and a Jamaican slave woman known only as Belle. Raised by her aristocratic great-uncle Lord Mansfield and his wife, Belle’s lineage affords her certain privileges, yet the color of her skin prevents her from fully participating in the traditions of her social standing.

“Dido Elizabeth Belle was born around 1761. She was baptised in 1766 at St. George’s Church, Bloomsbury. Her father, John Lindsay, nephew of the Earl of Mansfield, was at the time a Royal Navy captain on HMS Trent, a warship based in the West Indies that took part in the capture of Havana from the Spanish in 1762. It has previously been suggested that her mother was an enslaved African on board one of the Spanish ships captured during this battle, but the dates are inconsistent and there is no reason why any of the Spanish ships (which were immobilised in the inner habour) would have had women on board when they were delivered up on the formal surrender of the fortress. Dido’s baptism record, however, shows that she was born while Lindsay was in the West Indies and that her mother’s name was Maria Belle.”

Thanks to Ian Bourne for pointing us to a new movie about this fascinating bit of Caribbean history.

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Jamaica, Race, Slavery

American visitor: Barbados gun licensing shows a class-based system with the police favouring elites

barbados-shooting-football

An American who loves Barbados left this thoughtful comment on our September 8, 2011 post No jail sentence necessary for Johan Bjerkhamn, but larger issues ignored

by Patriot from Idaho

“No Police Commissioner has the right to act as a tinpot dictator and not tell the nation what the nation needs to know in order to form an intelligent and thoughtful set of solutions to commonly held problems.”

I have read many of the comments here, and I am aghast at the many misinterpretations of common law terminology. I am also, as a Life Member of the NRA here in the USA aghast at the apparent lack of openness and complete honesty of the Bajan Police. I am shocked and actually angered on the behalf of the entire Bajan nation that this situation of a lack of complete honesty about such an important body of law has not been corrected.

I have been visiting your beautiful and precious nation for over 20 years now and I have observed with relish the wonderful dialogue that comes with every election. A more literate and thoughtful populace anywhere cannot be found. And I respect the Bajan Nation for this in a way that I do not respect my own, sadly enough. I am very protective of the rights we Americans enjoy, and the differences between us and other nations. Continue reading

33 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Police

What happened to the Bim I knew?

barbados wave flag

“How can a prosperous flourishing country which gained it’s independence from mother England in 1966 have fallen into such a Political, Economic, Social & Financial morass in 47 years?”

by Wily Coyote

How can a prosperous flourishing country which gained it’s independence from mother England in 1966 have fallen into such a Political, Economic, Social & Financial morass in 47 years?

Under the leadership of the British the country flourished, economically, financially and socially. It can be argued that this flourish was on the backs of black slaves, indentured white slaves and an aristocratic over bearing British master.  The point is that the country did flourish and was looked on as the JEWEL of the Caribbean.

During the initial years of independence the leaders of the country were black and white, British educated and schooled in old world ethics. Eventually locally educated and raised individuals assumed the day to day responsibilities, the political entity controlled by the blacks and the economic identity controlled by the whites. Today in 2013 these black/white control distinctions are becoming somewhat less distinct in the economic forum as the non-whites are now responsible for the majority of lower/mid level commerce.  The non-blacks still control the majority of the larger corporate end of the economy which may or may not reside within the country.

The education, political, economic, social and financial learning of all these new controlling groups was heavily influenced by the Caribbean Culture, both in Barbados and surrounding countries.

Caribbean people are well known for their “laid back attitudes”, poor work ethics, liming, put it off till tomorrow attitudes. This is not necessarily to be taken as a bad thing and in fact is good for ones longevity providing you do not interfere with thy neighbours wife.

However this attitude can get you into trouble very quickly economically should you not keep close attention to exactly what’s happening in the global environment that we deal in today.

Barbados economy has moved from being agricultural based to one of tourism and off shore banking, both of which the country is not in control.  Barbados has attracted a large off shore banking economy by offering LOW TAX rate shelters for higher tax jurisdictions. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Politics

What we really need in Barbados is more innovation, more inventions… and more vibrations

Guilty… I couldn’t help it!

:-)

Cliverton

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Filed under Culture & Race Issues, Technology

Canadian travel agent Yvonne Bramson explains why some tourists are avoiding Barbados

kadooment blocked

Photo from the BFP story Grand Kadooment child-sex scandal

Dear friends in Barbados,

As Crop Over season gets into high gear I would just like to make a few comments. I am a travel agent for a large company in Toronto, Canada and have been to Barbados several times over the years. I have many friends there and also family and am hearing from both them and my colleagues at work (who hear from their travelling clients) that Barbados has changed a lot. What people are observing and saying is that what Crop Over symbolises has become a thing of the past.

I remember when most of the people participating in the grand finale parade were wearing period costumes to symbolise the farm workers, etc. What we are seeing and hearing for the past few years is that is has become something quite different. It seems to be a huge party where many of the women of all ages come out to show off their bodies – many in next to nothing. I happened to have been in Barbados last year at Crop Over time and was literally shocked at some of the behaviour I witnessed from the participants. I saw many women running over to men on the sidelines and gyrating on their laps, I saw many women dancing with their behinds way out against a man’s genitals. I saw women bent over with another woman gyrating on her behind.  Continue reading

103 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues

Why Bajan men (and all men) are avoiding marriage and fatherhood

“In reality, men are opting out of education, work and marriage because in all of these areas, the penalties are high and the rewards are low. Their choice is a rational one.”

Dr. Helen Smith – author of the book “Men on Strike”

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues

Chrissy: Made in Barbados family film

The trailer is too dramatic but I liked the film very much. Excellent production values, good story, good acting.

Robert

From a publicity email sent to BFP…

This movie played to sold out audiences in Barbados and Premiered in Jamaica to a standing ovation. American Author Eric Jerome Dickey says “I Enjoyed Chrissy! from the beginning to the End.” The High Commissioner of Barbados to Canada Mr. Evelyn Greaves says “This movie is highly recommended for the entire family, educators and organizations.” The movie has played in Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, London and Birmingham and is currently playing in Antigua. Chrissy is an inspirational movie for the entire family and stars 10 year old Makalah Harrison and Cara O’Donnell, Sophia Thomas lead actor of the HUSH series and Barbados’ own Mac Fingal and Peter Boyce. Shot entirely on location in Barbados, Chrissy will take you on a roller-coaster of emotions as you move from scene to scene with the children. Continue reading

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Filed under Culture & Race Issues

Lawyer Mark Goodridge named Queen’s Counsel – How many previously “Most Wanted by Police” are awarded QC?

QC mugshot?

QC mugshot?

Lawyer Mark Goodridge named Queen’s Counsel

“The honour which you have garnered has come at the price of your continued respect of the court system in which you work and of which you have been officers since the date of your admission to practise law,” Sir Marston told them.

“Those junior to you in years called, and in years born, will look to you for guidance and leadership. They must continue to receive it and to see it demonstrated, not only in your words, but in your actions, particularly in your respect for Her Majesty’s judges and her courts,” he said.

And with the words: “May I invite you to take your seat at the Inner Bar?”Sir Marston welcomed Deputy Solicitor General Donna Brathwaite, Speaker of Parliament Michael Carrington, Brian Clarke, Stephen Farmer, Hal Gollop, Mark Goodridge, Deputy Clerk of Parliament Nigel Jones, Milton Pierce and Stephen Walcott as new QCs.

Full story at The Nation Show Respect to Judges

I can’t remember what the end story was about Mark Goodridge…

There was some controversy about him back in 2006. Mark Goodridge and his son were charged with a racial attack on a young black man on his property, but then it all faded away without any public announcement that I saw. What was the ultimate disposition of all the happenings? Does anyone remember… because I can’t find it on the internet.

Barbados Free Press story published October 16, 2006 – Barbados Lawyer Wanted For Beating Of Teen – Thoughts Of Racial Tension, White Privilege & Black Attitudes

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Race

Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves: How many travel writers will you jail?

Kenton Chance Wikileak

St. Vincent’s racist Prime Minister is on the record very upset that two BBC journalists ‘snuck’ into the country by telling Immigration authorities they were visiting as tourists when they were really working on a story about Harlequin and Dave Ames. Had the BBC journalists been filming a feel-good travel or investment article, Gonsalves wouldn’t have had a problem with them.

Too bad the BBC story was about how Harlequin collected hundreds of millions of pounds from British pensioners but only built a handful of promised holiday homes before running out of money.

Gonsalves threatened that Panorama tele-journalists Paul Kenyon and Mathew Hill committed crimes punishable by imprisonment.

No word on what PM Gonsalves thinks about Harlequin’s Ponzi scheme, but he is sure upset at the reporters for mentioning it!

How dare dem bloody reporters come snooping around and then expose the story of how SVG  and its politicians let a twice-bankrupt double glazing salesman get away with using the country to promote a pyramid scheme!

One problem though: does Prime Minister Gonsalves intend to apply the same rules to every travel journalist who comes to SVG as a tourist and then writes nice things about the island? Or is Gonsalves only concerned about the law when investigative journalists expose the truth?

If Prime Minister Gonsalves wants to put some journalists in jail he should start with every travel and finance writer who took a free trip from Harlequin and declared they were on holiday when they arrived in SVG. They are the ones who printed the flowery stories that set the trap for thousands of trusting Britons to lose their pensions. If any journalists deserve jail, it is that bunch.

Of course, it’s a good thing that the BBC journalists are of the white race because Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves is probably going soft on them. You see, Ralph Gonsalves is a racist who dislikes mulattos and brown people – and said so.

Further Reading

I-Witness News Citing possible jail time, BBC reporters staying away from SVG

Cartoon: SVG journalist Kenton X. Chance with PM Gonsalves. See BFP’s More WikiLeaks hit the fan!

27 Comments

Filed under Culture & Race Issues, Freedom Of The Press, Political Corruption, Politics & Corruption, Race