Tag Archives: United States

United States again puts Barbados GOVERNMENT on watch list for copyright violations and theft of intellectual property.

US Trade Representative Barbados

“Cable operators and television and radio broadcasters, some government-owned (e.g., in Barbados), reportedly refuse to negotiate with the PROs for compensation for public performances of music.”

… from the Office of the United States Trade Representative 2015 annual review of intellectual property rights (Special 301 Report)

From the report…

Barbados remains on the Watch List in 2015. The United States continues to have concerns about the interception and retransmission of U.S. cable programming by local cable operators in Barbados and throughout the Caribbean region without the consent of, and without adequately compensating, U.S. rights holders. The United States also has continuing concerns about the refusal of Barbadian TV and radio broadcasters and cable and satellite operators to pay for public performances of music. (See Section I). The United States urges the Government of Barbados to take all administrative actions necessary, without undue delay, to ensure that all composers and songwriters receive the royalties they are owed for the public performance of their musical works. In one case, the local PRO won a case before the Supreme Court regarding the appropriate tariff to be paid for broadcasts of its members’ music, and six years after that decision the PRO still has not received its monies because the requisite hearing at the administrative level has not yet been conducted.

In addition, the United States urges the Government of Barbados to adopt modern copyright legislation that protects works in both physical and online environments and to take steps to prevent the unauthorized and uncompensated retransmission of copyrighted musical and audiovisual content. The United States looks forward to working with Barbados to resolve these issues.

U.S. musical works are being publicly performed by radio and TV broadcasting stations without obtaining licenses from the appropriate public performances rights organizations (PROs). This problem has been reported again this year in Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. In some cases, the alleged infringing broadcaster is licensed by the government or is government-owned, which makes such actions even more troubling.

Cable operators and television and radio broadcasters, some government-owned (e.g., in Barbados), reportedly refuse to negotiate with the PROs for compensation for public performances of music. PROs also assert that they have struggled to advance their legal claims in the local courts and, even when successful, cannot obtain payments. These problems have been reported in Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago as well as Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

With regard to cable and satellite broadcasting of copyrighted network programming, although Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines currently maintain a statutory licensing regime that includes a requirement to pay royalties to rights holders, reportedly, royalties are not being paid.

Download the full report PDF 500kb here

US Department of State Barbados page

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Economy, Ethics

Discover Card to partner with Barbados

Discover Barbados

Innovation pays off for re-Discover programme

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

I am frequently surprised and occasionally humbled by some of the people who read this column. Out of the blue a couple of weeks ago, I had a call from a senior executive of the Illinois based third largest credit card issuer in the United States, with a quoted 47 million card holders.

He had been following some of our tourism initiatives and wanted to see how we could ‘partner’ to help increase their brand awareness and acceptance on Barbados.

Of all our major markets the United States has, for the last decade, been one of the most challenging. Until the 2014 figures are published the industry at large can only speculate about any real recovery last year.

But what we do know though is that 2013 recorded the lowest number (120,584) of long stay American visitors over the past 11 years.

So clearly, there is work to be done and I am sure with the recent restructuring that has taken place, we will start to witness increased numbers in the not to distance future; especially if we wish to sustain any added airlift.

So what is finally being negotiated with DISCOVER is a win-win scenario that will hopefully achieve their objectives, while at the same time help to raise our destination visibility in US market, again at minimal cost.

With help from the Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc (BTMI) the new branded re-DISCOVER DISCOVER lunch and dinner voucher will be mainly distributed from the BTMI office in the arrivals hall of Grantley Adams International Airport. As we know, the vast majority of passengers have to pass this office after clearing immigration, baggage collection and before clearing customs. This will be critical in the possible success of the promotion.   Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism

Should Barbados Burn George Washington’s House?

george-washington-barbados.jpgAdmiral Nelson vs. George Washington – Different Standards Applied

In 1751 at the age of 19 years, George Washington, the future eighth leader of the revolutionary American colonies of Britain, spent two months in Bush Hill House in Barbados with his brother Lawrence. The house was restored in 2006 with the efforts of many under the Barbados National Trust and, as expected, is a big tourist draw that has gained international attention.

Using the same logic of those who oppose the statue of Admiral Nelson in Bridgetown, (and tongue in cheek) I state here and now that I believe the government of Barbados should burn the George Washington house to the ground in an internationally broadcast television spectacle.

Folks want to remove the Bridgetown statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, because he strongly criticised anti-slavery crusader William Wilberforce and, although he never owned a slave, Nelson expressed support for the institution of slavery as a foundation of the British Empire.

In contrast to Nelson’s verbal support for slavery, George Washington actually owned slaves – hundreds of them. At age 11, George Washington owned ten slaves, and thus was a slave owner when he stayed in Barbados in 1751. When he died, Washington had 316 slaves at his Mount Vernon estate with the ownership of these wretched human beings split between Washington and his wife. Oh yes… Washington also rented 40 slaves from a neighbour.

Nothing Like A Little Walk At Night To Warm The Blood!

And just like the other Virginia slave owners and other big men of the day including Thomas Jefferson, good old Georgy Boy visited the slave quarters once in a while to claim all the benefits of owning other human beings. Female slaves couldn’t say “no” to Massa, and Washington’s late night walks increased his slave holdings in the most economical way. Do a little research if you have any doubts – save your outrage for Georgy-Boy himself, Okay?

bridgetown_barbados_nelson_statueSo what do you say folks? Should the Nelson statute be tossed in the ocean (because arguments about “moving” the statue aren’t really about moving the statue, they are about dishonouring Nelson publicly.)

And if we dishonour Nelson without the same treatment for Washington, aren’t we the biggest hypocrites?

Or should we leave history as history, and instead of destroying or concealing it – explain these two great men in the context of their times, warts and all?

What say you?

Further Reading

Nation News: The Moore Things Change – Admiral Nelson

CNN: Barbados saved home where Washington Slept

Official Website: George Washington House Barbados

Wikipedia: George Washington and His Slaves

History News Network: George Washington’s Slave Child?

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Filed under Africa, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Ethics, History, Human Rights, Race, Slavery

United States Regularly Drugs Deportees Against Their Will

Barbados’ treatment of the Africans recently stranded by GIA doesn’t look so bad compared with the way the United States of America deports people.

It seems that the good old US of A drugs people against their will. A disgusting story in the Washington Post.

Then again, where but America and a few other countries with a courageous news media would a newspaper have the guts to run such an article? Barbados? Cha… you mek sport!

Excerpt from the Washington Post

The U.S. government has injected hundreds of foreigners it has deported with dangerous psychotropic drugs against their will to keep them sedated during the trip back to their home country, according to medical records, internal documents and interviews with people who have been drugged.

The government’s forced use of antipsychotic drugs, in people who have no history of mental illness, includes dozens of cases in which the “pre-flight cocktail,” as a document calls it, had such a potent effect that federal guards needed a wheelchair to move the slumped deportee onto an airplane.

“Unsteady gait. Fell onto tarmac,” says a medical note on the deportation of a 38-year-old woman to Costa Rica in late spring 2005. Another detainee was “dragged down the aisle in handcuffs, semi-comatose,” according to an airline crew member’s written account. Repeatedly, documents describe immigration guards “taking down” a reluctant deportee to be tranquilized before heading to an airport.

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Ethics, Human Rights, Immigration