Tag Archives: Aviation News

Airline Partnership opportunities gained, lost and possible

caribbean-airlines-logo.jpg

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

With any number of uncertainties there can be very few other businesses like airlines which present a constant indeterminate challenge.

It only seems a twinkle ago since massive controversy hit the media over the sale of the valuable Heathrow slots by the now defunct BWIA for what many felt was an under-valued GB Pounds 5 million to British Airways in 2006.

In 2011 the current Trinidad and Tobago Prime Minister, Kamela Persad-Bissessar commissioned a forensic management audit which concluded that a fair market value for the slots then ranged from GB Pounds 23 million to GB Pounds 44 million in a report dated 8th May 2012.

Then with a blaze of glory in 2012 it was announced the replacement Caribbean Airlines was going to return to London, but this time flying into Gatwick.

Last week according to AirwaysNews.com, Caribbean Airlines (CA) will return its Boeing 767 fleet to lessor ILFC (International Lease Finance Corporation) during the first quarter of 2016, axing the Gatwick route and these aircraft will join the Air Canada Rouge fleet soon after.

This year, the airline has already returned two Boeing 737-800 aircraft with two more that are set to go soon. This will reduce the fleet to twelve B737s while retaining all five ATR 72 equipment.

Since the re-birth of the carrier, it has been difficult to follow what if any substantial part they play in supplying airlift to Barbados, specifically for inbound tourism and I probably am not alone into thinking ‘we’ as a destination do not have the best of working relationships with them.

Can this be changed or improved on specific routes, perhaps with a Barbados/Fort Lauderdale service or would this further alienate the existing legacy and low cost airlines?  Continue reading

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Barbados Transportation, Business

Are LIAT’s major shareholders deliberately destroying the airline in order to re-create it without debt?

liat-airlines-disasterby Passin Thru

Sometimes our assumptions about a situation or problem blind us to simple answers that are right in front of us.

Could it be that the apparent increasing incompetence by senior LIAT management and a rapidly deteriorating cash flow are actually part of a plan to push the airline over a financial cliff as soon as possible, so that it can be reformed without debt and with limited political fallout?

LIAT’s biggest asset is its routes. Nothing else really matters. The aircraft are leased, and LIAT’s facilities are also mostly rented. The airline owns little of any real value that couldn’t be bought at fire-sale prices after a bankruptcy.

So let’s here from those who know about airlines and LIAT in particular… Is it possible that LIAT’s shareholders are deliberately destroying the airline?

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Barbados Transportation

Welcome to Barbados! Oh… you wanted to be in Rochester, New York?

jetblue barbados

“When she got off in Barbados, she thought that she was in Rochester,”

“And she was like, what happened to Rochester? This looks a lot different.”

And you thought your day was interesting?

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Scotland’s plan to scrap air passenger taxes changes everything!

Barbados glasgow prestwick airport

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

Just weeks after writing in this column about the need to explore further smart partnerships, British Airways have announced they are working with two rail companies, Heathrow Express and First Great Western, to offer seamless connections for travellers living in the West of England and Wales on a single fly/rail ticket.

While the Heathrow arrangement will not directly benefit Barbados, the concept offers enormous potential with Gatwick, Manchester, Birmingham and the Scottish cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Frankly I am surprised that British Airways have pipped Virgin Atlantic to the post on this initiative, especially as Virgin Trains are significant rail operators in their own right.

From a recent media release ‘The combined booking takes away the stress and fear of missing a flight, if a train is delayed or a connection missed, by giving customers the peace of mind they’ll be on the next available flight – and even get overnight accommodation if the next service isn’t on the same day’.

It has become increasingly more important, if we are going to regain market share that we assess the whole holiday product components, rather than just focus on the ultimate destination itself. Both from a consumer cost basis, but also to ensure it the most overall pleasurable hassle free experience.

The Smith Commission recommendation takes Scotland a step closer to determining whether their airports will either eliminate the Advanced Passenger Duty (APD) altogether, or dramatically reduce it. There can be little doubt that the overwhelming conclusion amongst the business community is that elimination would substantially boost the Scottish economy and give Glasgow, Prestwick and Edinburgh airports a distinct cost advantage over airlines flying from those in England.  Continue reading

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism

Thomas Cook drops Manchester-Barbados route – while Barbados government markets to a low-income / high employment area of the UK

Thomas Cook airline

Sad news – maddening news

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

It would appear we are losing the summer weekly Thomas Cook Manchester-Barbados flight from early May 2015. Perhaps there is sufficient surplus capacity on the Virgin Atlantic Monday flights, but Thomas Cook provided a lower cost option for many and while we are lacking in empirical evidence, my guess is that this flight was used by many people who have a second home on Barbados and/or who stay in our lower priced accommodation options.

While Virgin currently retains their larger once-a-week Boeing 747 on the Manchester service during the low season, it may not prove a challenge at all.

But if Virgin decides to change equipment to the smaller A330 as they did from Gatwick, clearly less capacity and more demand will lead to the inevitable higher air fares and deter the more budget conscious holidaymaker who largely keeps the industry afloat during the eight long summer months.

For travel in April 2015, a return flight from Manchester with Thomas Cook is presently available at GBPounds 376. With Virgin the cost is GBPounds 638 over a similar period. In fairness luggage and meals are ‘extras’ with Thomas Cook, but there is still a huge price differential – particularly if a family of four are considering travelling.

What is also a little puzzling was our tourism policymakers had already indicated that there was going to be a special effort in growing the markets out of the North of England and Scotland.

And especially after the July long Barbados Summerfastic tour by a beautiful liveried bus in partnership with Capital FM which visited several northern cities and Scotland.

I totally agree there is tremendous further potential, but you also have to look at the demographics which should take into account average disposal income and affordable access to the airport serving the destination.

Unemployment is at its highest in England’s North East and North West with average weekly earnings considerably lower than the south of the country. Clearly the cost is often the ultimate deciding factor.

And now I make no apologies in returning to a pet-peeve subject, websites which are not kept current…
Continue reading

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Economy

Boycott LIAT for a day

Robert Pitcher Barbados LIAT

Fun N’ Sun publisher Robert Pitcher is calling upon Bajans and people throughout the Caribbean to boycott LIAT Airlines for a day in protest of the airline’s high fares and low-quality service.

That’s all well and good, but the real question is: Should Barbados and other governments be involved in the airline business at all – especially when LIAT hasn’t made a dollar profit since it was founded?

If there is one thing we’ve proved over the last 100 years, it is that governments cannot run businesses in a profitable manner. It is impossible.

What governments can do though, is to subsidise government businesses so that they squeeze out all privately-owned competition. Can we say “RedJET” ?

In our past, a case could be made for a government subsidised national or Caribbean airline to bring tourists, business people and trade from over and away and also island hopping. With the explosion of affordable air travel this is no longer a necessity… and if we choose to subsidise air travel to the island, it is much easier to give money to Virgin Air than to run our own airline.

It’s time to kill LIAT dead dead dead.

Pitcher: Avoid LIAT

BOYCOTT LIAT FOR a day.

That’s what publisher Robert Pitcher is calling on the regional public to do to send a clear message to the airline that they are fed up with its high airfares and poor quality service.

He also advised the regional governments looking to invest in the island hopping airline to keep it afloat not to put a cent into it until it changes its board, which he contends, is not suited to oversee the affairs of running a modern airline.

Instead, a group of successful Caribbean businessmen from the separate territories should be appointed to the board with a Caribbean chief executive officer at the helm who understands the market.

Speaking at a press conference at his Rendezvous Gardens, Christ Church offices this morning, Pitcher a director of Fun N’ Sun publishing, also took issue with the announcement that LIAT would be flying to Haiti four times weekly from December.

Pitcher said presently the airline cannot even service their existing routes efficiently and this move would be to a country where loads would be doubtful, similar to the unsuccessful route to the Dominican Republic.

… read the rest of this article at the Nation Pitcher: Avoid LIAT

Thanks to an old friend for suggesting this article!

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100 Days of LIAT’s new chairman doing nothing

by Aviation Doctor

LIAT released a photo of its new Chairman, David Evans. We couldn't resist adding a few details! *

LIAT released a strangely formated photo of its new Chairman, David Evans. We couldn’t resist adding a few details! *

It has been 100 days since David Evans, the new CEO, has taken over at LIAT and we have seen NO real changes. It is business as usual at LIAT, which means burning taxpayers money – very disappointing. At this time I award a grade of C, at best.

The first 100 days of any CEO are very important to lay out what it is you will do, to let people know where you are heading and what changes are needed. By now Mr. Evans should have a good understanding of what lies ahead, the problems, opportunities, possible approaches and likely obstacles. The quick screen should be done, all problems reduced to simple elements and now zero in on key metrics and detailed analysis.

By now, LIAT’s management, Board and Chairman should have gone from the denial phase, through the resistance phase and be at the acceptance phase, and be on board for on going cost reductions to turn the company around. The CEO needs to be creating excitement and enthusiasm in getting all on board for a brighter future.

IF after 100 days it is not there, then Mr. Evans has lost his momentum, and employees will lose faith in any real change. This time it’s different – the Eastern Caribbean has no money.

“Economic stagnation for 6 years and no one is realizing the fact the Eastern Caribbean has lost its attractiveness as a tourist destination.”

Competition is now not only Mexico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, but also new destinations of Thailand, Colombia, Costa Rica and Brazil. The Eastern Caribbean continues to lose its place in the global tourist market.  Continue reading

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Pilot James Lynch: Barbados will not achieve ICAO Category One

“PM Stuart and Minister Sealy are both leading aviation in Barbados into hell in a handbasket…

I hate to see a once-thriving country stagger to its knees because EVERYTHING is at the very apex of mediocrity…”

To:
PM Freundel Stuart
Minister Richard Sealy

Gentlemen…

by James Lynch, Twotter pilot extraordinaire!

by James Lynch, Twotter pilot extraordinaire!

I am advised by an inside source that the current Director of Civil Aviation, Mitchison Beckles, will be retiring within months, and my informant understands that his successor has already been chosen (and will be yet another career Air Traffic Controller).

About 1970 I was an Air Traffic Controller in Barbados for two years and worked with Mitchie Beckles (I went on to become a charter and airline pilot, among other things). He was professional and competent, but he did not – and still does not – have the wider world’s breadth of qualifications, knowledge and experience to be a Director of Civil Aviation to deal at a high level with every aspect of that office, including dealing with commercial aviation.

The same can be said of all of the Directors of Civil Aviation in Barbados for the last four decades, starting with Clyde Outram… Barbados has experienced one former career Air Traffic Controller / incompetent Director of Civil Aviation after another, but yet I understand that – despite recently failing the ICAO Category One competence evaluation again – it is government policy to continue doing the same thing over and over again, expecting a different result.

Do you ever learn anything? Do you really want ICAO Category One? Because THIS is not the way to go about achieving that objective.

And this appointment is not from lack of other qualified Barbadians… as someone with almost 40 years in a wide range of aviation situations I have myself tried for the same position over the last 15 years and have been unable to even apply – because no vacancy was ever advertised, and each time yet another Air Traffic Controller was appointed.

I also know other qualified Barbadians who are interested – but who have also never seen a vacancy advertised.  Continue reading

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Robert MacLellan asks when LIAT chairman Jean Holder will be held accountable

“Real competition is brutal and the wolves are sensing and circling the wounded LIAT prey.”

“Idle threats” from LIAT’s chairman do more harm than good

by Robert MacLellan

by Robert MacLellan

The board of LIAT airline is clearly feeling the pressure of mounting ongoing criticism of its consistent inability to achieve a stable business model and to provide a vital intra regional air service in the Eastern Caribbean on a reliable basis.

Unfortunately, the announcements of 6th March from the LIAT chairman, Jean Holder, strongly suggest a strategy still devoid of any coherent business sense. Take on huge investment in multiple new aircraft but then shrink the airline’s network? “Passing strange” and “wondrous pitiful”, to quote Shakespeare. If, instead, this is Dr Holder’s idle threat, designed to panic other regional governments in to investing in an airline with such a tarnished reputation, then that also is a strategy likely to fail.

Investors seek companies with proven management expertise. Yet, in his 100 day strategy announcement last week, Dr Holder stated that the current directors and senior management have invited “some experts” to undertake route analysis of the LIAT network. Outside consultants are needed for a basic management task – even after 57 years of LIAT operations? No wonder there are accusations of amateurism in LIAT management and no wonder years of persuasion by Dr Holder have failed to elicit much new investment in the airline from other governments in the region. Continue reading

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LIAT disaster continues as Ralph Gonsalves challenges his critics to put their money up

“Put your money where your mouth is . . . . Everybody wants to talk about LIAT, but a number of these persons don’t want to have an authoritative position to speak about it. Being a chief executive officer of a company or the prime minister of a country which is not a shareholder doesn’t give you the right to talk authoritatively about LIAT,”

St. Vincent and the Grenadines PM Dr. Ralph Gonsalves in the Nation’s No place for buccaneers in LIAT says PM

Is the reality that LIAT’s failure is not about leadership, financing or equipment? Could it be that 70 years of Caribbean commercial aviation has revealed a basic truth that no Carib-based airline could ever be profitable?

Here is the fourth letter to LIAT shareholders from Dominica hotelier Gregor Nassief, urging PM Gonsalves to step aside as chairman of the LIAT shareholder’s committee.

Honourable Dr. Ralph Gonsalves of St. Vincent and the Grenadines
LIAT (1974) LTD
V.C. Bird International Airport
P O Box 819
Coolidge
Antigua

Dear Prime Minister Gonsalves:

Re: Run it like a business before it goes out of business

On the televised program Time to Face the Facts on Sunday, February 23rd, I appealed to you to step aside as Chairman of the Shareholder’s committee of LIAT. As mentioned on the program, given the respect and admiration I have for you, particularly on your stance and leadership on issues such as reparations and the cholera outbreak in Haiti, it was personally difficult for me to do this. But it is necessary.

LIAT has moved from an operational meltdown in the Summer of 2013 to a financial meltdown a mere 7 months later. LIAT drains our treasuries, operates inefficiently and stifles competition. The source of LIAT’s problem is its financial unsustainability and as with everything else at LIAT, no one is accountable. As Chairman of the Shareholder’s committee, the buck stops with you.

LIAT needs to fight the battle of its life to transform itself to be financially viable and sustainable. But you believe, and have stated so publicly, that LIAT can never be profitable. This battle, therefore, needs a different general.

Unsustainability

LIAT has lost ec$120m in the last four years. Last month, LIAT could not pay both the lease on its aircraft as well as its payroll. So it chose one and delayed the other. A leased ATR gives 36% more seat capacity than its closest Dash 8 equivalent but is double the (lease) expense. In 2015, repayments will begin on LIAT’s recent loan of us$65m to purchase new aircraft. So monthly cash outflows go up even more.

And the new inflows to cover this? Inter-island tourism is down 60% in 7 years and LIAT’s load factor is running at about 55%. The fantasy (aka “business plan”) is that the load factor will go up to 75%. The fantasy is also that LIAT will fly its way out of losses by expanding to new destinations – Jamaica, Haiti, Aruba, Panama, and eventually to cities in North and South America.  Continue reading

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Economy

LIAT Leadership Asleep At The Wheel Again

by Robert MacLellan

by Robert MacLellan

In the first month of 2014 Caribbean regional media reported that LIAT has had to choose between paying employee salaries and paying aircraft lease charges in order to maintain flight operations. Even before the news of LIAT’s latest financial crisis, the flight chaos of last summer was nearly repeated in December 2013, at the start of the Caribbean’s tourism high season, and was only averted through last minute decision changes by LIAT’s board of directors and its temporary CEO.

The LIAT fleet was reportedly due to reduce to only nine aircraft last December. At the same time, aircraft conversion training for flight deck crew was planned to be ongoing and flight deck crew annual vacations were scheduled to peak that month. With a similar mix of factors to those which caused LIAT’s summer meltdown, the potential for major disruption to flights appeared to be equally great for this winter. Unbelievably, the LIAT board and senior management had authorised this disastrous scenario to coincide with the Christmas holidays and the start of the international tourism high season in the Caribbean.

Having just avoided that mismanagement disaster in December, LIAT executives have been faced in mid January with the imminent grounding of six company planes by the aircraft leasing company.  Lease payments are reportedly tens of millions of dollars in arrears and a collapse in flight operations has only been avoided by delaying payroll for LIAT’s long suffering employees.

Ongoing disarray at LIAT     Continue reading

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REDjet and the silence of Caribbean Airways Ltd.

 

Merger of REDjet and Caribbean Airways Ltd. a viable solution!

by Leonard St. Hill

A mysterious silence surrounds the existence of Caribbean Airways Ltd. as the national airline of Barbados duly licensed but without planes to perform its function, while REDjet an airline duly incorporated in Barbados with planes to operate a national service is a first denied and delayed a licence to do so, and then deprived of financial support to complete the deficiency of Caribbean Airways Ltd. by merger or other lawful means to avert bankruptcy proceedings.

Receivership should not be regarded as inevitable liquidation proceedings; it should be for REDjet an opportunity for creative redemption where imagination is not lacking.

By a merger between Caribbean Airways Ltd. and REDjet as the national airline of Barbados with operating capital secured by diverting subsidies from foreign airlines now paid for airlift to Barbados hotels, the viability of the combination should be assured.

There can be no net loss attributable to the operation of a national airline of a country whose economy is almost totally dependent on tourism for its viability and whose owner is the ultimate beneficiary of income from nominated airfares i.e. fares lawfully fixed by the government of the national airline.

REDjet is entitled to the same guarantees even not “in extremes” that are assured Four Seasons and CLICO. It has prospects for generating a CARICOM AIRWAYS SYSTEM in collaboration with LIAT and Carribean Airlines Ltd. for a short, medium and long range operations, serviceable by existing aircraft of the partnership.

Leonard St. Hill
St. James, Barbados

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DISASTER! American Airlines Dallas to Barbados flights end August 19, 2012

American Airlines’ last remaining direct flight from Dallas-Fort Worth to Bridgetown is toast as of August 19, 2012.

Barbados Tourism Authority has yet to notify tourism industry partners

The Barbados Tourism Authority has again failed to notify tourism industry partners that another major airline cancelled a route to Barbados. Maybe the BTA is ashamed – and so they should be.

The Dallas-Barbados flight was announced with great fanfare in December 2010. The YouTube video above shows the inaugural flight. There was such hope. In BFP’s article at the time Tourism Matters – Non-stop Dallas to Barbados, Adrian Loveridge excitedly said…

“The new non-stop direct service from Dallas to Barbados, slated to start on the 16th December this year offers tremendous growth potential for our tourism industry. Not only will it tempt the estimated 6.5 million people that live in the greater Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington area, the fourth largest metropolitan population in the United States, but it offers some incredible connecting city opportunities.”

So much for that.  The initial excitement soon ebbed and collapsed entirely when the flight schedule imploded in April 2012. (See  BFP’s Dallas – Barbados dream collapses)

There is no valid excuse for this failure: Dallas-Fort Worth is 8th busiest airport in the world only 4 hours by jet from Grantley Adams and we can’t fill one airplane a week. Give me a break! Somebody should be fired… probably many people.

Sadly, it appears that our Barbados Tourism Authority proved themselves totally incapable of maintaining one tiny Boeing 737 a week to Bim from the EIGHTH BUSIEST AIRPORT IN THE WORLD located only four hours away!

Shouldn’t Bajans expect some positive results for our $100 million dollars a year expenditure by The Barbados Tourism Authority?

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US Court hits Grenada government airport revenues

A lesson for Barbados and Al Barrack?

Grenada owed money to a bank in Taiwan and didn’t pay – so the bank sued in the USA and now all US airline revenues that would have been paid to Grenada’s airport are being paid into an escrow account in the USA. As a result, the airport is in deep financial trouble and the Grenadian government looks pathetic on the world stage. If the situation isn’t rectified PDQ, the travel and tour sellers will soon start to wonder if their clients will get stuck in the middle someday. When that thought starts to form, the travel industry will start to recommend other destinations until confidence returns. It might be happening already because we discovered the story through ETN Travel News.

There is a lesson here somewhere about what can happen when governments decide to not pay lawful debts. Globalism is more than a word, you know. Increasingly, creditors are successful seizing assets in other countries when stonewalled by governments and courts in the Caribbean and elsewhere.

For the last day and a bit we featured Why Al Barrack will never win against the Barbados Government: The Fix is In! at the top of the blog – telling the story of how the Barbados won’t pay a man even when faced with an order from the Barbados court.

One of our readers, millertheanunnaki, commented…

“I am willing to bet that if Barrack were to sell the debt to an overseas factor through a “big” British or American firm of lawyers this matter would be settled within weeks. If not a judgment to seize Government’s properties in London or New York would certainly be enforced unlike what prevails locally.”

There are certain government assets that can’t be seized overseas (Embassies, airplanes etc.) but the idea of seizing airline fees is a shocker. Can you imagine what would happen if some court in New York or London ordered airlines to pay all Grantley Adams airport fees to the court over the Al Barrack debt? How about port fees for cruise ships too?

Wuhloss! That would put the mongoose in with the chickens! If that happened you can bet the government would settle with Al Barrack right away – and that just shows how bankrupt our government is: both financially and morally.

Statement from St. George’s Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation

ST. GEORGE’S, Grenada – The St. George’s Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation is working with other government departments, particularly the Attorney General’s Chambers and the Ministry of Finance, to arrive at a solution to the current financial difficulties being experienced by the Grenada Airports Authority (GAA).

This situation arose as result of the EXIM Bank of Taiwan obtaining judgment against the government of Grenada for outstanding loans in a suit filed in the United States. The Taiwanese have made a claim for all monies owing to the government of Grenada and its agencies to be paid against the loan. Consequently, a request was made to airlines operating on the Grenada route to pay monies owed to the Grenada Airports Authority to the Taiwanese. Continue reading

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Ethics, Grenada, Offshore Investments

Delta Air Lines cancels Atlanta – Barbados flights.

“Barbados flight wasn’t performing well”

Delta Air Lines announced today that it has cancelled the seasonal Atlanta-Barbados flight service due to economic conditions.

This follows Delta’s 2007 cancellation of year-round service as we reported at the time in our story Delta Discontinuing Flights To Barbados, Antigua, Trinidad, Turks & Caicos – Low Demand

This latest airline withdrawal doesn’t mean that the Barbados Tourism Authority failed, or that our tourism product isn’t attractive. It is yet another illustration that times are tough and are getting worse everywhere. As I write this the markets are tanking with the largest single day drop since – since – since a few days ago.

My friends: don’t listen to the pronouncements, excuses and reassurance from the government mouth pieces. This is going to get worse. Much worse.

There are some things you can do help yourself, your family and your friends to make it through the financial storms ahead…

  1. Shun debt.
  2. Work harder than you ever have before. Do a good job for your employer and let them make someone else redundant.
  3. Look after your friends and family as best as you can. You might need their help next.

Perhaps our readers can contribute some other suggestions and advice.

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Jamaican Prime Minister alleges dirty tricks in Barbados airline war

PM Golding says Barbados “held up” Caribbean Airlines aircraft in “aggressive action”

The REDjet saga continues with the Jamaican Prime Minister accusing Barbados of harassing a Caribbean Airlines aircraft at Grantley Adams International Airport.

“What I’m told took place two days ago when a Caribbean Airlines plane was held up, I don’t want to use the word detained, in Barbados and the suspicion is that it is an aggressive action, and I hope it is not, because that is not the way we in Caricom should resolve our issues.”

PM Golding to The Gleaner: Red Jet Row Heightens

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REDjet gives up on Trinidad & Tobago – Jamaica route

Barbados – Jamaica flights also postponed for two months

by BFP with contributions from a special friend

REDjet announced today that the airline will not pursue plans to fly between Jamaica and Trinidad, and that the Barbados – Jamaica route is postponed for two months.

The story behind the story…

Some observers wonder how long REDjet can continue, and whether the forces aligned against the new Caribbean airline will be successful in squeezing the financial life from the upstart before it really gets off the ground. There is a story behind the story but nobody is really telling it because REDjet officials have been keeping their silence in the hope that they will be able to work things out with the various Caribbean governments.

Says a special friend to Barbados Free Press: “If it doesn’t work out and REDjet ultimately fails, the fireworks will really start. Robbie Burns is a consummate diarist. It won’t be pretty.”

Further Reading

BFP May 13, 2011 – REDjet Update: Political problems with Trinidad and Jamaica

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REDjet Update: Political problems with Trinidad and Jamaica

“A few weeks ago we at Barbados Free Press criticized REDjet for launching without having all the paperwork in place with Trinidad and Tobago.

We take it all back.”

Caribbean Airlines files complaints with Jamaica and T&T

REDjet: “Political delays beyond our control”

The launch of any new business is a formidable task, but when you’re talking launching a new airline into a politically charged world of protected competitors… now you’re talking trouble!

And so it is with REDjet as the governments of Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago seem to be doing everything they can to block the new upstart from Barbados.

A few weeks ago we at Barbados Free Press criticized REDjet for launching without having all the paperwork in place with Trinidad and Tobago.

We take it all back.

We take it back because we now see what the game was and is: to keep REDjet waiting forever until they give up. That’s what the governments of T&T and Jamaica would like to see happen and they are working hard to protect other airlines from those Bajan upstarts.

We’re guessing but it looks to us that after being blocked for over a year in various attempts to move forward, the REDjet team came to the conclusion that the issue had to go before the public. REDjet had to launch to force its way into the market or else they would never launch.

We’re behind REDjet 100% because the simple truth is this: if REDjet fails, the big losers will be the ordinary people of the Caribbean who, for the first time, will be able to fly to other islands without having to sell their first born children.

Further Reading

Barbados Today: REDjet still awaits T&T green light

Caribbean 360: REDjet says CAL protection blocking Jamaica flights

Go-Jamaica: JCAA tight-lipped about Redjet’s delay

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Jamaica, Politics, Trinidad and Tobago