Category Archives: Technology

A real Barbadian international business success story: Automotive Art promotes training in Barbados to attract new USA business!

Automotive Art Barbados training

Need an automotive paint system in the USA? Come to Barbados for training… in January.

Our own Bajan automotive paint supplier is leveraging their Barbados training centre to sell product throughout the USA. I love it!

by Robert

Please pardon me while I reminisce for a bit…

A long time ago my father advised that if I wanted to become a professional pilot as he was, I should first become a certified aircraft mechanic. (Certain folks will cringe at the word “mechanic” and want the word changed to “technician” or “maintenance engineer” depending if they live in America or Europe. Noted, but I’m old school and will continue to say “mechanic”. I also hold DC-3 & 727 type-ratings – master certifying mechanic and command pilot -, so put that in your tonic and gin too.)

My father knew that pilots come and go according to the ups and downs of the airline industry, and that a medical down-check can leave a professional pilot begging in the streets. He wanted me to have a valuable skill to fall back on, and I’m grateful I listened to him. My career as a professional pilot lasted only 7 years, and I made little money compared with my 20 years crawling on my back underneath aircraft with rivet gun or wrench in hand.

My father also told me that there was nothing quicker and easier than a new coat of paint to increase the value of a used aircraft, boat or car.

Young men should pay careful attention to that statement because it is true: There is nothing quicker and easier than a new coat of paint to increase the value of a used aircraft, boat or car.   Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Business, Technology, Uncategorized

TED Talk: The kill decision shouldn’t belong to a robot

Technology always brings unforeseen social changes

In Barbados we have zero transparency, zero accountability and the ruling political elites can do pretty well what they want. Author Daniel Suarez’s TED presentation predicts that as autonomous weapons become cheaper and more lethal, smaller governments and developing societies will have an advantage over larger, more developed societies. It seems far fetched to imagine Barbados wielding autonomous weapons and drones – but maybe not. Suarez also talks about private interests using the same weapons. Considering the Columbian and Mexican crime cartels, that’s not such an impossibility either.

The above YouTube video is brought to you by those friendly folks at Samsung. That’s right, the same folks that make your phone also make and deploy automatic killer machine guns for a very reasonable US$200,000 each. Just set ’em and forget ’em…

“This raises the very real possibility of anonymous war. This could tilt the geopolitical balance on its head, make it very difficult for a nation to turn its firepower against an attacker, and that could shift the balance in the 21st century away from defense and toward offense. It could make military action a viable option not just for small nations, but criminal organizations, private enterprise, even powerful individuals. It could create a landscape of rival warlords undermining rule of law and civil society. Now if responsibility and transparency are two of the cornerstones of representative government, autonomous robotic weapons could undermine both.

Now you might be thinking that citizens of high-tech nations would have the advantage in any robotic war, that citizens of those nations would be less vulnerable, particularly against developing nations. But I think the truth is the exact opposite. I think citizens of high-tech societies are more vulnerable to robotic weapons, and the reason can be summed up in one word: data. Data powers high-tech societies. Cell phone geolocation, telecom metadata, social media, email, text, financial transaction data, transportation data, it’s a wealth of real-time data on the movements and social interactions of people. In short, we are more visible to machines than any people in history, and this perfectly suits the targeting needs of autonomous weapons.”

Watch Daniel Suarez’s entire TED Talk here.

Thanks to an old friend for the suggestion.

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Filed under Barbados, Science, Technology

Bitcoin Barbados connection

bitcoin_barbadosThe massive half-billion dollar theft of Bitcoins from Mt. Gox took a new twist today as allegations surfaced that Mt. Gox CEO Mark Karpeles lied about the alleged theft.

For me, I’ll put my little wealth in gold, silver, artificially low Chinese currency, land and tools. If everything else fails, tools can keep you fed and happy.

There’s nothing like a new 90 degree drill and a few good clecos to make me happy.

Bitcoin? Ya takes ya chances…

The recent success of Bitcoin, a decentralized cryptographic currency, has raised new research questions on the opportunities and risks of virtual currencies. A handful of research papers have appeared in multiple disciplines, spanning a range of outlets, including top security conferences, legal journals, and reports of international financial organizations. This workshop aims to bring together interested scholars who study virtual currencies, Bitcoin in particular, and their supporting ecosystems from a technical or socio-economic perspective.”

… from the website of International Financial Cryptography and Data Security AssociationThey sure got that one wrong!

While Media Chased Nakamoto, Crypto-Geeks in Barbados Marveled at his Creation

While the hunt for Satoshi Nakamoto morphed into a media circus last week, a community of cryptocurrency experts from which the bitcoin founder likely sprang was tucked away in sunny Barbados discussing the present and future of his remarkable invention.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Business & Banking, Economy, Technology

Afra Raymond loses ‘afraraymond.com’ domain name

afra raymond CMMB

Yup. It looks like our old friend Afra Raymond lost his domain name ‘afraraymond.com’. Enquiries to that website are now directed to a website that is definitely not our Afra Raymond.

Meanwhile, Afra continues to send out posts and emails directing folks to AfraRaymond.com

Oops!

If you want to read Afra’s articles (and they really are worth your time) you can still go directly to his website at WordPress…

http://afraraymond.wordpress.com

Have a read of Afra’s latest about the efforts to shut down his bold exposure of the truth about Invader’s Bay, CLICO and all manner of government corruption.

“There are several lessons one can draw from this exchange – the sheer hostility to the truth which is now becoming a disturbing ‘new normal‘ in our society;

… the invisible hand of the bureaucracy in devising large-scale developments, stated to be for the benefit of citizens, without citizen inputs; the inescapable reality that these obstructive forces operate across and within all our political administrations.”

Afra Raymond: The Uff Bluff

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Filed under Technology

What we really need in Barbados is more innovation, more inventions… and more vibrations

Guilty… I couldn’t help it!

🙂

Cliverton

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Filed under Culture & Race Issues, Technology

Mini Moke returns – but Barbados misses Caribbean distributorship

Mini Moke new old

The Moke: Old and New

The Moke is in production again – this time in China – and the new version remains true to the concept launched by Austin way back in 1964. The car was originally a military version of the famous Austin Mini and is loved by tourists all over the world’s tropical zones. This time it will also have an electric version.

The new manufacturers have just awarded Caribbean Distributorship to a company in the British Virgin Islands: Tola Moke Limited.

The motto on the distributor’s website is “A fleet of Mokes for an army of tourists”

Optimistic yes, but we need some optimism around this place!

Good luck to Bruce Wong of Tola Moke. We hope he sells a bunch ’bout this rock, and we’re really anticipating the electric version.

Tola Moke: Introducing the new Moke!

Wikipedia: Mini Moke

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Filed under Barbados, Technology

E-readers a great idea for Bajan schools, but money isn’t the only problem

Barbados School Textbooks

Dear BFP,

There is a move afoot to equip all secondary school students with E-readers. This is a great idea because this technology actually cuts costs over the long run when compared with physical textbooks and provides the latest learning materials.

That’s the upside. The downside is that E-Readers are more fragile than textbooks, and are more likely to be stolen. We’re not even talking about the problems with procuring and supporting the technology.

I can’t think of one educational procurement programme that has actually turned out well with the current administration and I don’t see why we should have faith that this one will be any better. I hope we have some rules in place before we spend millions on these devices with no controls about bidding and conflicts of interest etc.

(name withheld upon request)

E-readers for all

A move is now on to provide all 23,000-plus secondary school children in Barbados with e-readers.

The initiative, which is being led by the heads of the island’s 22 secondary schools, is designed to eliminate the headaches of issuing each child with nearly two dozen textbooks annually, and eliminate the tens of thousands each institution spends of book replenishment each year.

One of the education administrators who expressed delight at the progress made on the project so far noted they were aiming to have the e-readers in students hands not later than September 2014, “but sooner than that if all goes according to plan.”

One principal explained that while the evolving of the Textbook Revolving Loan Scheme into an e-reader based programme started with principals who clearly understood the benefits such a shift would bring, they all recognised that before it becomes a reality the Ministry of Education would have to be brought on board as a major player.

In the meanwhile though, the principals explained that given the continued dramatic fall in the prices of e-readers versus the escalating cost of traditional textbook, the change would significantly enhance the mechanism for supplying students with reading material…

…continue reading this article at Barbados Today

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Filed under Barbados, Education, Technology