Category Archives: Slavery

How Bridgetown built the economic foundation of the British Empire – only to be discarded when the profits were gone.

Barbados_Slave_License2.jpg

Slavery Reparations have never interested me because I know that whatever we receive will never be enough for the victims class, and that anything we do receive will be stolen by the political class. No reparations will ever touch my hand. No amount of reparations will provide a steady flow of clean water from my pipes or establish a modern sustainable economy.

Britain could pay us 10 billion pounds and not one new hospital bed or surgery will appear at that slum we call the Queen Elizabeth Hospital – or anywhere else. A trillion pounds will not erase the arrogance of government employees towards citizens, nor will it cure the ‘Island Time’ syndrome that makes foreign business investors run like mad from the Caribbean once they get over the rum, sun and sand.

Barbados is incapable of receiving and delivering reparations honestly and effectively for the general good.

Whose fault is that? I’m not sure, but I do know that at one time Barbados was the driving economic force and secure military base that built and maintained the British Empire.

Whatever Tristram Hunt has written in his new book Ten Cities that Made an Empire, he’s probably 50% correct and 50% nonsense. After all this time, who can say?

But I look forward to the read.

Cliverton

Ten Cities that Made an Empire by Tristram Hunt, review: ‘enthralling and compelling’

A fascinating account of 10 cities that were shaped by, and helped shape, British rule

Bridgetown, Barbados has always held a particular appeal for the British. The legacy of empire is all too apparent, and is, indeed, exploited for tourists. The series of historical attractions based on Plantation House present, as Tristram Hunt writes, “a sepia version of the colonial past”. Nostalgia for cricket, rum cocktails and the old plantation lifestyle trumps the blood-drenched history of slavery on the island. Bridgetown is a modern city, but the colonial memory continues to reverberate.  Continue reading

5 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Human Rights, Slavery

Barbados Red Legs flag – A symbol of cultural affirmation

Barbados Red Legs Flag

Barbados Red-Legs can now boast their own cultural flag

“I know as an outsider, no symbology can be foisted onto another culture;

yet my humble offering might spark the imagination of someone who is from there, and inspire some movement toward cultural affirmation.”

contributed by Three-fold Now

The Red Legs are a cultural community in the Caribbean island of Barbados. They are descendants of Irish and Scottish indentured servants—some forcibly enslaved by Cromwell—and remain as “poor whites” in what is otherwise a predominantly Afro-Caribbean nation. The performer Rihanna claims some family ties to this Irish-Barbadian lineage.  Continue reading

30 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Slavery

Barbados government sells Four Seasons to investors from slave nation Qatar

slavery-barbados.jpg

Qatar is a slave-nation in the 21st Century

Barbados Today is reporting that the government is selling the abandoned Barbados Four Seasons hotel project to a Qatar-based investment group.

Qatar, of course, is dependent upon slave labour to keep its economy and building boom rolling along. The Qatar slavery horror stories are legion. There is no question, no argument against, no misunderstanding. Qatar is a slave state in the 21st Century. (However, being a Muslim nation, Qatar knows that contemporary slavery is both sanctioned and ordered by the Koran, along with abductions and forced-conversions to Islam.)

So let there be no misunderstanding about this either: The descendants of Bajan slaves are happy to do business with modern day slavers.

Money trumps human rights on this rock, and we’ll do anything to get more.

Slavery reparations for Bajans? What a joke. Will Qatar slaves come after Barbados some day for reparations? As we’ve said here from the beginning: Spend any reparations payments to free current slaves.

There are more slaves today than at any other time in history; yet Barbados is about to shake hands with Qatar slave owners.

42 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Slavery

Qatar FIFA World Cup built upon slavery

“Qatar is a slave state in the 21st Century…”

“I am trapped here. The main office will not give me back my passport…”

“How many people are going to have to die so that this World Cup can take place?”

The Guardian: Qatar’s World Cup Slaves

“The evidence uncovered by the Guardian is clear proof of the use of systematic forced labour in Qatar. In fact, these working conditions and the astonishing number of deaths of vulnerable workers go beyond forced labour to the slavery of old where human beings were treated as objects.

There is no longer a risk that the World Cup might be built on forced labour. It is already happening.”

Aidan McQuade, director of Anti-Slavery International

 

1 Comment

Filed under Human Rights, Slavery

Chinese government continues persecution of Christians, Barbados continues begging for Chinese handouts

April 28, 2014 - Chinese government destroys 6-year old Sanjiang Church. Fifty percent of China's slaves are religious prisoners.

April 28, 2014 – Chinese government destroys 6-year old Sanjiang Church. Fifty percent of China’s slaves are religious prisoners.

Trading Bajan silence on Christian persecution for cash

Remind me… What was that verse about the ‘love of money’ ?

We Bajans are so selective in our outrage. Worse than Americans really – for if the Americans ban products from Cuba while still doing business with China, the largest single human rights violator in the world, at least the US Government criticizes China’s government for slave camps and other violations of human rights, even as the US continues to do business.

Bajans, however, remain silent about China’s ongoing human rights violations.

How can it be that Barbados – a country founded upon slavery, whips, rape, kidnapping and all manner of human misery – remains silent about China, a country that still maintains the largest slave camp system in the world? How can our government say nothing about the Chinese government kidnapping pregnant women and forcing abortions as government officials hold down screaming mothers? How can we say nothing about China destroying hundreds of Christian churches and imprisoning millions because of their religious beliefs?

The answer is this: The Chinese government purchases Bajan silence in exchange for gifts of cash, travel and material goods. It is in the economic interests of our Government and of certain businesses and individual Bajans to forget about China’s slave camps, religious persecution, forced abortion and infanticide.

And so we remain silent, and even embrace Barbados China friendship.

Further Reading

Telegraph: China accused of anti-Christian campaign as church demolition begins

Telegraph: Christians form human shield around church in China

Daily Mail: Woman finds letter from Chinese slave

NY Times: China’s forced labor

4 Comments

Filed under Barbados, China, Human Rights, Slavery

Infanticide by Barbados slave mothers – an expression of resistance?

slavery-barbados.jpg

It is truly disturbing to think that Bajan mothers murdered their own newborns as an act of rebellion to deny human slave assets to their captors and owners.

We know that as the Atlantic slave trade and supplies of new slaves dried up due to the efforts of abolitionists, plantation owners in the Caribbean and USA placed the emphasis on breeding new stock. The record is clear that some plantation owners thought it their right to impregnate their slaves with white blood for ‘better product’.

It is difficult to think that captive human beings were treated as property to this extent, but that was the reality of the day. The master had all rights, the female slave had none.

As you read the following article, just remember this…

There are more slaves held in captivity today than at any other time in history.

The obvious response to slave infanticide is to conceptualize it as an act of desperation, a sad act, or an act of altruism, in the sense that it was intended to save enslaved children from a life of hard labor, degradation, and physical, sexual, and mental abuse.

But what if slave infanticide, in all its horror, was an expression of resistance? To conceptualize it this way places agency back in the hands of the slave women who killed their children, because it assumes that their decision was actively, discursively antagonistic and insurrectionary.

… from Infanticide as Slave Resistance: Evidence from Barbados

4 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Slavery

Anti-gay laws undermine CARICOM’s slavery reparations demands

Execution Blacks Gays Lesbians Slavery

Homosexuals executed in Iran, Blacks lynched in USA

Human Rights are Human Rights: whether denied upon skin colour or sexual orientation

by Sean Macleish
Caribbean Alliance for Equality

Prime Minister, Ralph Gonsalves, the current chair of CARICOM (Caribbean Community Secretariat) along with other Caribbean leaders who are continuing to cultivate and place a high discount rate on the lives of their lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) citizens are helping to mortgage the region’s future with atrophy, by retarding the growth of their nations in exchange for power by majority rule. Social inclusion, equality and open diversity foster environments where everyone can bring their best to the table and feel valued without incurring the costs associated with repression.

In 2014, 12 of the 15 CARICOM member states still criminalize homosexuality.

Suriname is one of the remaining member states that has legalized homosexuality since 1869. Social economics has many costs and the archaic philosophy of legalized oppression is counterproductive to investing in a nation’s greatest asset; it’s people. In February, referring to the costs of homophobia, President of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim stated, “Institutionalized discrimination is bad for people and societies. Widespread discrimination is also bad for economies. There is clear evidence that when societies enact laws that prevent productive people from fully participating in the workforce, economies suffer.”  Continue reading

9 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Slavery