Category Archives: Slavery

Barbados 1780 rum made by slaves fetches highest price ever

harwood rum barbados

Queen Elizabeth’s cousin sells 12 bottles from secret stash for US$127,555.65

In 1780 on the island of Barbados, unknown slaves without names distilled and barreled rum for their master: Edward Lascelles, the first Earl of Harewood. The rum was shipped to jolly old England in barrels where it was bottled and tucked away in a cellar at the family mansion… where it sat for 231 years before being discovered. Wuhloss! It wouldn’t have lasted a week ’bout my home!

Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, the Earl (later promoted to Viscount Lascelles) owned some 22 plantations and 2,947 slaves in the Caribbean – including Lascelles House near Holetown.

All these years later his descendant, David Lascelles, 8th Earl of Harewood, is the first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II and great-grandson of King George V.

Mount Gay Rum owns the Barbados estate.

What did the 8th Earl of Harewood do with all that money from the sale of slave rum? Good for him… he gave the money back to the Caribbean people – to the Geraldine Connor Foundation.

Good for the Queen’s cousin!

But he only gave back the money from 12 bottles of rum.

We still waiting for the money from the sale of the family mansion: bought an paid for with the blood and tears of thousands of slaves.

Robert.

Further Information about this event:

Harewood House Auction and the Rum Ambassador

 

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Filed under Barbados, History, Human Rights, Slavery

Castrated black African slave for sale. Best offer sought for fast sale!

Saudi-slavery

(click photo for large)

1 – Black skin. Tall 172 sm. Weight 60 kilos.
2 – Castrated (excellent for working with a family) you can check him with a doctor our yourself if you have experience in the matter.
3 – [His] health is quite undamaged and has no imperfections.
4 – Age 26 years.
5 – Religion muslim and [he is] obedient and will not disobey you except in what displeases God. Please, the matter is very serious and is not a joke.

The trans-Atlantic slave trade ended a few years back. The Muslim slave trade continues because it is authorised and instructed in the Koran.

Class… discuss.

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Filed under Human Rights, Slavery

“Better to be poor and in control of my own life”

A few wonderful pieces from our old friend Ian Bourne at The Bajan Reporter.

That man has a nose for news and a belly for a story. A pity he’s not in charge of CBC’s news department…

“Your Condo does not impress me much!”

Money dictates the quality of life that you live, and without money you cannot survive: that in itself is a true statement. Unfortunately, a lot of times we make less money -even though we might do the same quality, and quantity of work as a man in the workplace.

This then leads you to perhaps marry for stability, to ensure that you will live comfortably. Money does not make you happy, so don’t ever throw in the towel and settle with a man just because he is financially stable. Great if you find, and love someone who is wealthy and you two have decided to make a life together. However, succumbing to fear and marrying for money while you stare at your dwindling bank account is not the answer.

Read the entire article at The Bajan Reporter: Your Condo does not impress me much!

Dido elizabeth belle

Belle – Illegitimate mixed race daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral

Based on a true story, Belle follows the story of an Dido Elizebeth Belle, the illegitimate mixed race daughter of Royal Navy Admiral Sir John Lindsay and a Jamaican slave woman known only as Belle. Raised by her aristocratic great-uncle Lord Mansfield and his wife, Belle’s lineage affords her certain privileges, yet the color of her skin prevents her from fully participating in the traditions of her social standing.

“Dido Elizabeth Belle was born around 1761. She was baptised in 1766 at St. George’s Church, Bloomsbury. Her father, John Lindsay, nephew of the Earl of Mansfield, was at the time a Royal Navy captain on HMS Trent, a warship based in the West Indies that took part in the capture of Havana from the Spanish in 1762. It has previously been suggested that her mother was an enslaved African on board one of the Spanish ships captured during this battle, but the dates are inconsistent and there is no reason why any of the Spanish ships (which were immobilised in the inner habour) would have had women on board when they were delivered up on the formal surrender of the fortress. Dido’s baptism record, however, shows that she was born while Lindsay was in the West Indies and that her mother’s name was Maria Belle.”

Thanks to Ian Bourne for pointing us to a new movie about this fascinating bit of Caribbean history.

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Jamaica, Race, Slavery

Chinese government calls Senator Trevor Carmichael “a renowned business lawyer”

china-barbados-flag-sm

Why yes, of course.

No doubt about it.

Just so long as we don’t mention that China has the world’s largest organisation of slave camps.

Shhhhh!  Nevermind that awful news if they are going to give us money and gifts!

“Even more gruesome and largely ignored are the mobile execution vans that harvest prisoners organs on the way to planes to be shipped and sold on the black market to the highest bidder.”

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Barbados military head thanks Ambassador from world’s largest slave camp operation

china-barbados-flag-sm

Ambassador Xu Hong Meets with Chief of Staff of the Barbados Defence Force

(From Chinese Embassy in Barbados

2013/08/16

On August 14, Chinese Ambassador Xu Hong met with Colonel Quintyne, Chief of Staff of the Barbados Defence Force (BDF). They exchanged views on how to deepen bilateral relations with a focus on cooperation between Chinese People’s Liberation Army and Barbados Defence Force.

Colonel Quintyne extended his gratitude to the Chinese side for the technical support and personnel training provided to the BDF. He pointed out that in recent years, the military cooperation between Barbados and China developed smoothly with fruitful progress. He hoped to strengthen the cooperation and exchange between the two militaries thus deepening the friendship between Barbados and China.

Ambassador Xu spoke highly of the effort made by the BDF to promote bilateral military cooperation. He expressed the willingness to work together with Barbadian side to further widening the scope of military cooperation with the aim of raising bilateral relations to a new level.

And now for the counter story…

Slave Labour Camps “Vital Part of Chinese Economy” – Should Barbados Take Gifts From Communist China?

Barbados silent about China kidnapping, forcing abortions, sterilizations on 7000 women

China’s New Slave Empire: Africa

China’s Olympic Soccer Balls Made By Slave Labour – But Barbados Doesn’t Care

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Filed under Barbados, China, Human Rights, Slavery

KFC Barbados and Ian Bourne’s Bajan Reporter: the subjects of BFP’s 5,000th post

This is it folks – Post number Five Thousand

Maybe we should have done up something special to reflect back on five thousand posts in almost seven years, over 110,000 comments by readers, over 13 million visitors and that one special day when 44,087 people stopped by Barbados Free Press and read about how our corrupt Prime Minister Owen Arthur got caught depositing a $75,000 campaign donation cheque into his personal bank account.

Instead, we thought we’d thank KFC for setting up free WiFi in seven of their thirteen restaurants because it is all the free and unprotected WiFi hotspots around this rock that have allowed us to do what we do for so many years. Without free WiFi we couldn’t bring Barbados Free Press to the people.

And we thank Ian Bourne and Bajan Reporter for bringing those KFC WiFi spots to our attention.

Back in 1837 William Cullen Bryant wrote the following as he sought to defend the rights of abolitionists to free speech. His words are as true today as they were then:

“The right to discuss freely and openly, by speech, by the pen, by the press, all political questions, and to examine and animadvert (speak out) upon all political institutions, is a right so clear and certain, so interwoven with our other liberties, so necessary, in fact to their existence, that without it we must fall at once into depression or anarchy. To say that he who holds unpopular opinions must hold them at the peril of his life, and that, if he expresses them in public, he has only himself to blame if they who disagree with him should rise and put him to death, is to strike at all rights, all liberties, all protection of the laws, and to justify and extenuate all crimes.”

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Filed under Barbados, Blogging, Freedom Of The Press, History, Human Rights, Slavery

On this day of emancipation, we pray for millions still held as slaves in China, North Korea, Africa and throughout the Muslim world

“What kind of place is this?”

Stories…

Mende Nazer

Shin Dong-hyuk

Simon Deng

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Filed under History, Human Rights, Slavery

Oprah Winfrey to interview Rihanna in Barbados. Which Barbados will Oprah portray?

Which agendas are at work? What will the end product be?

A friend of mine was once interviewed by a television reporter about a problem in the community. When he saw the broadcast he was both astonished and angry because the message he communicated had been corrupted and spoiled by an editor, he believes deliberately, to make him less convincing and less credible with the audience. The tv station didn’t just leave out parts of his answers, they inserted his answer from one question to appear as if he was answering another question. The whole interview, the whole news report, became an agenda-driven lie and was my friend’s first-hand education in television fakery.

That was an extreme example of the power of editing visual images to mislead, but it reminds us that everything we see on television is carefully crafted, and selectively pieced together to suit a purpose, and at best only conveys the journalist’s perspective on the subject. When we see something on television we can easily allow ourselves to think that we’ve seen the truth, when we’ve only seen little pieces selected by someone else.

Oprah is coming to Barbados to interview Rihanna – or perhaps she’s already been. You can bet that Oprah’s staff have already decided the big messages of the show – and Rihanna hasn’t even opened her mouth yet. The preview above gives a clue that Oprah’s intent is to feature some of Barbados ‘where it all began’ for Rihanna. I guess that means the audience won’t just be seeing the Platinum Coast. (Come on up to Grape Hall, Oprah, and we’ll put on some grill fish that can’t be beat.)

No doubt the Barbados Tourism Authority is involved somehow, and if they aren’t already they should be working overtime to make sure that Oprah and her staff get the best of the best service and support we can manage. Is the government springing for staff rooms at the Hilton? We own the place, don’t we?

Subjects that interest Oprah Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Celebrities, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Rihanna, Slavery

Sanna Allsopp’s latest documentary: Built to Last

This trailer is for the upcoming documentary film, “Built To Last.” It follows the stories of the amazing men and women competing in a range of Olympic, Paralympic and non-Olympic sports in the Caribbean. The documentary features well known and up and coming Caribbean athletes in a range of sports and asks ‘What is it about this region that produces so many incredible sportsmen and women?’ The story takes us across seven different Caribbean islands to look for the answer.

“We do very well at power events, very well at events that require a lot of strength and a lot of speed. And it would go right back to where we came from as a people. Those are the people that actually were warriors, they were fighters…”

… from the Sanna Allsopp / StudioCaribe documentary Built To Last.

StudioCaribe on Facebook

IMDb: Sanna Allsopp entry (Hey, Sanna… you need an update at IMDb)

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Filed under Barbados, Race, Slavery, Sports

Bajan-Brit author Andrea Stuart: Britain still in denial about British slavery

UPDATED: August 10, 2012 – Andrea Stuart’s book now listed for sale

To be the descendant of Barbadian slaves and white British sugar plantation owners is an extraordinary legacy, for it means that one side of your family once owned the other. But that is the strange inheritance that Andrea Stuart discovered when she began to investigate her family history…

Read a new account in Mail Online and purchase Sugar in the Blood: A family’s story of Slavery and Empire

“I think that in Britain there’s still a degree of denial or an unwillingness to really confront the back story of British slavery and so on. So there’s a sense of it being something that happened sometime a long time ago in some far away place, rather than realizing that the British colonies were, at that point, Britain, that they were British territories and the connection between the colonies and Britain is incredibly intimate. Not something that happened far away and a long time ago, but something that happened in Britain in the world of British life and something that still has repercussion today, and I think that’s the thing that, as a culture, Britain hasn’t quite come to terms with.” Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Slavery, Sugar

One British tourist’s view of Barbados history

Should Barbados look to Germany and the Holocaust camps for guidance?

by John Slapp

I have visited Barbados many times over the past years and each visit is preceded by excitement at the prospect of reacquainting myself with friends made in previous years and the beauty of the island.

This excitement is, however, tempered by the knowledge that Barbados has denied and neglected its history, both architectural and human, in favour of the “Luxury Dollar”.

Architecture

Walking around Bridgetown one is struck by the number of neglected historical buildings left to rot and decay. Just one example of many is the Eye Hospital. There are many more. They are treated no better than the eyesores of empty hotels along the Boardwalk.

The Garrison area is one shining light, however Needhams Point, with its guns rusting in the sea, is now a part of the Hilton, for goodness sake! An example of the Dollar being more important than Heritage. It also seems that the Gun Collection in St Ann’s Fort is a national secret if direction signs are anything to go by.

Driving around the island one comes across many old sugar mills and boiling houses. Maybe I am at fault but I have yet to see one restored to give visitors an idea of what they were like. A few days of cane crushing at Morgan Lewis is commendable but hardly inspiring.

I could go on and on, but I think that you get the point.

Human

Barbados has a history. Much as we all wish it had been otherwise the fact remains that slavery, both white and black, is a major part of this history. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues, History, Human Rights, Slavery

Barbados history destined to remain unknown without real action

Building tourism upon the dark history of slavery… slavery that inspired rebellion and a soaring quest for freedoms and rights.

by Passin Thru

For the last few days the local Bajan news media has been full of stories about the Oistins Charter. Our illustrious government says the country will be establishing itself as a heritage travel destination and our Prime Minister (what’s ‘is name again?) emerged from the martini lunches at the Hilton to do some photo ops. (See Barbados Today here and here)

Heritage tourism is a good idea – maybe a great idea – as studies show that tourists need more than sun, sand, sex and rum to get excited about a destination. But while some of us move to recreate and enhance our Bajan brand with history and heritage travel, others were busy destroying the architecture of one of our oldest structures.

According to Karl Watson on his Facebook page, the oldest existing building in Bridgetown was built around 1650 – and last week the new owners decided to “renovate” it by filling in some of the roofline with concrete. This happened at the same time that the government was saying wonderful things about heritage tourism.

Herein is the lesson about “saying” and “doing”: wonderful pronouncements from our Prime Minister and other elected representatives are not reality.

Words are not laws or enforced standards. Words are not deeds. Saying words, however inspired, is not taking action. Promising to do this or protect that does not make it so.

That is the problem with Barbados and that is the problem with the wider Caribbean: we citizens are told what the government plans or says it plans, but we never follow up to see what the government really does or accomplishes. In the old days we accepted the falsehoods in exchange for tinned beef, biscuits and a smash of rum or whisky. Now we trade our acceptance of obvious falsehoods for what?

What do we gain by nodding and repeating in a zombie-like fashion “Oh Yes! We will be a heritage travel destination!”

Who can hold the government accountable or judge performance when the most basic of financial expenditures remain secret because our politicians deliberately failed to pass a Freedom of Information law?

The Oistins Charter is the latest government fashion!

The Charter of Barbados was signed at the Mermaid Tavern, Oistins, on 11th January 1652 and ratified by the Assembly on 17th January 1652. It predates the US Declaration of Independence but contains an Article much treasured in the US…

As entered in the Charter of Barbados:-

3. That no taxes, customs, imports, loans or excise shall be laid, nor levy made on any the inhabitants of this island, without their consent in a General Assembly.

In the US Declaration of Independence this clause reads:-

There shall be no taxation without representation.

Barbados can be a world-class heritage tourism destination: but only if we stop destroying the physical evidence of our history. Perhaps fifty years ago Bajans – black, whitish and in between – made a decision to let the physical reminders of slavery rot and vanish. Walls, plantation houses, public buildings and books were offered as sacrifices to the concept that if we destroyed the relics we could forget or change history.

What a travesty! How wrong we were… and here we are today being force to “recreate” buildings and places like the Mermaid Tavern where the Charter of Barbados was signed.

Bajans must watch our representatives carefully to see that they really mean what they say. We should not accept any excuses. The truth is: I don’t believe Prime Minister Stuart. I don’t believe he and his government mean what he said, nor that the government will do what he said he would.

And that is probably the saddest thing of all.

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, History, Slavery

Babies explain why Chinese-made products are so cheap.

Colour photo (look closely) of a normal day in Shanxi, China

The Statistics

Babies born with Spina bifida, anencephaly and other neural tube defects – for every 1,000 live births…

USA:  .75 for every 1,000 live births

China, Shanxi: 14 for every 1,000 live births

That’s 18.7 times more neural tube malformed babies born in Shanxi than in the USA. (ie: partial brain, spinal cord on the outside etc.)

The Photos

For unbelievable photos of living conditions and pollution in China, check out China Hush Amazing Pictures, Pollution in China.

I just can’t bring myself to post the photos of the children online. If you must, go to Google and search for photos of “shanxi china pollution birth defects”. It doesn’t much matter whether the “SafeSearch” is on or off: Send the children out of the room first.

The Story

Time: How Chinese Babies Pay the Price for Chinese Pollution

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Filed under China, Economy, Environment, Human Rights, Slavery

Iran to hang Christian ‘convert’ for apostasy – Barbados supports Iranian human rights violations

There is no freedom of religion or thought under Islam

When asked to “repent” by the judges, Youcef stated, “Repent means to return. What should I return to? To the blasphemy that I had before my faith in Christ?” The judges replied , “To the religion of your ancestors, Islam.” To which he replied, “I cannot.”

… Pastor Yousef Nadarkhani to the Muslim court

Iran can always count on the support of Barbados at the United Nations

“After all its public support over the years for Iran’s evil acts, how can Barbados now criticize the Islamic despots for more of the same?”

Youcef Nadarkhani was born to Muslim parents in Iran, but he never practiced or adopted the Muslim faith. At 19 years old he became a Christian, and later he became a Christian pastor.

That makes him apostate under Islam, and subject to death according to the Koran. Pastor Nadarkhani might well be already executed by the time you read this, or the Iranian barbarians might have ‘annulled’ the sentence due to worldwide pressure in this one case.

The annulment of one death sentence doesn’t change reality though, and the reality is this…

This persecution and trampling of human rights happens all the time in Muslim majority countries around the world. Whether killed by the state or by wild mobs of Muslims – Christians and other infidels are murdered daily by Muslims seeking to impose their ideology, social values and legal system upon the world.

Where is the outcry from so-called ‘moderate’ Muslims over the ongoing murders of non-Muslims to impose Islam? Where was the outcry from vast numbers of ‘moderate’ Muslims when Christian schoolgirls were beheaded as Ramadan trophies in Indonesia and more recently in the Philippines? When hundreds of Christians were hacked to death in Nigeria? Where is the horror of ‘moderate’ Muslims that 100,000 Copt Christians have fled Egypt since “Egyptian Spring”?

Where is the outrage when Muslim mobs burn Christian churches, Buddhist temples and Jewish synagogues throughout the world and Muslim governments deny freedom of religion?

Where is the diplomatic and community outrage in Barbados?

Barbados has a shameful voting record at the United Nations when it comes to human rights. We actually make a habit of siding with evil at the UN. We don’t want to offend any country that might toss a few coins our way.

Barbados loves Iran and we don’t care if they hang 15 year old girls for having sex outside of marriage, hang teenagers for gay sex, or imprison, torture and kill non-Muslims for their religion or stone women to death for adultery. We “abstained” from a UN vote citing Iran for human rights abuses, torture, discrimination and violence against women and then voted to protect Iran from UN sanctions.

After all its public support over the years for Iran’s evil acts, how can Barbados now criticize the Islamic despots for more of the same?

Further Reading

Present Truth Ministries: Full Story of Youcef Nadarkhani

Washington Post: Christian Pastor Yousef Nadarkhani faces potential execution

BFP – November 25, 2010: Shame on Barbados: abstains from UN Vote allowing execution for being Gay or Lesbian

BFP – December 23, 2006: Gutless Barbados “Abstains” From UN Vote Citing Iran For Human Rights Abuses, Torture, Discrimination and Violence Against Women – AND THEN VOTES TO PROTECT IRAN!

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Religion, Slavery

Saudi Court orders woman lashed: for driving

Muslim men expect no further trouble from this woman.

Saudi Muslim males experts at keeping women in their place

It’s not enough that Saudi men cut off their daughters’ genitals so they cannot enjoy sex. It’s not enough that women are forced to wear bags over their heads to prevent rape. It’s not enough that women have to have permission from a male family member to venture outside the home.

In Saudi Arabia, rape victims are punished and a woman’s word in court is only worth half of a man’s word. It’s not enough that daughters are by law given less than sons at the time of an estate settlement. It’s not enough that women are denied health care for lack of female medical staff. Let a woman die rather than have a male doctor touch her, that’s the Saudi way.

Those Saudi women must be kept in their place, and one of the ways that Saudi Muslim men do that is to prohibit women from driving. Can’t have women going anywhere they like, when they like, you know. That’s way too radical!

The Saudi laws are all based upon the Koran – and who are we mere infidels to be telling the Saudis how they should treat their women?

Besides… we need the oil so we don’t want to insult them by suggesting that they are doing anything wrong.

And when it comes to what young Barbadian Muslim women are taught in the Al-Falah Islamic School, well, who are we to complain about that either?

Saudi woman to be lashed for driving car

A Saudi woman has been sentenced to to 10 lashes for challenging a ban on women driving. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Religion, Slavery

Cherokee Nation says descendants of Cherokee nigger slaves unworthy of citizenship

Why use the “N” word? Because the Cherokee slave owners did.

The Cherokee Nation, the second largest Indian tribe in the United States, has banished almost 3,000 black Americans from citizenship.

These people are descendants of black slaves owned by the Cherokee when the tribe was forced to move to Oklahoma in the mid 1800s. This is not just a symbolic gesture – tenth generation black Cherokees are being denied voting rights and payments from government agreements and treaties.

A Reuters newspaper article outlines the racist move by the Cherokee Nation, but it does not mention this one very important fact when it comes to who has Cherokee blood and who does not have Cherokee blood…

There was a time when the rule was this: If a Cherokee man married an outsider, their children were considered full blood Cherokee, but if a Cherokee woman married an outsider, their children were not Cherokee.

Cherokee Nation… your racism, your sexism, is disgusting.

The Cherokee Nation wants sympathy from the world for their indigenous status? If I said what I feel, my Auntie Moses wouldn’t speak to me for a month.

Cliverton

Cherokee Indians: We are free to oust blacks

OKLAHOMA CITY — The nation’s second-largest Indian tribe said on Tuesday that it would not be dictated to by the U.S. government over its move to banish 2,800 African Americans from its citizenship rolls.

“The Cherokee Nation will not be governed by the BIA,” Joe Crittenden, the tribe’s acting principal chief, said in a statement responding to the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Crittenden, who leads the tribe until a new principal chief is elected, went on to complain about unnamed congressmen meddling in the tribe’s self-governance.

The reaction follows a letter the tribe received on Monday from BIA Assistant Secretary Larry Echo Hawk, who warned that the results of the September 24 Cherokee election for principal chief will not be recognized by the U.S. government if the ousted members, known to some as “Cherokee Freedmen,” are not allowed to vote.

The dispute stems from the fact that some wealthy Cherokee owned black slaves who worked on their plantations in the South. By the 1830s, most of the tribe was forced to relocate to present-day Oklahoma, and many took their slaves with them. The so-called Freedmen are descendants of those slaves.

After the Civil War, in which the Cherokee fought for the South, a treaty was signed in 1866 guaranteeing tribal citizenship for the freed slaves.
The U.S. government said that the 1866 treaty between the Cherokee tribe and the U.S. government guaranteed that the slaves were tribal citizens, whether or not they had a Cherokee blood relation.

The African Americans lost their citizenship last month when the Cherokee Supreme Court voted to support the right of tribal members to change the tribe’s constitution on citizenship matters.

… read the full article at MSNBC here

Cherokee Nation justifies racism here.

* About the photo… it’s a photo of the Cherokee Nation website modified by BFP for political commentary and satire. We added “* Descendants of former Cherokee Nigger slaves not welcome.”

Barbados Free Press wishes to clearly state that the Cherokee Nation website doesn’t say that. WE SAID IT because we want to make political commentary and we believe the people who run the Cherokee Nation website are racist.

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Human Rights, Slavery

Barbados Human Trafficking: Conflict of Interest in Government?

Will Health Minister Donville Inniss work against his own, and his friends’ financial interests?

Once again Barbados has been placed on the Tier 2 Watch List of the US State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons Report. That’s one rating from the bottom and puts Barbados on a peer with countries like Angola, Bangladesh, Chad and Syria.

Countries rated higher than Barbados include Pakistan, Sierra Leone and our neighbour Trinidad and Tobago. Although there are valid arguments that the US State Department’s rating process is flawed, when you read the report it is apparent that Barbados takes a very casual approach to trafficking in persons.

“We’re wondering if our country’s failure to address human trafficking is because one of our senior government ministers is closely aligned with, and profits from, the pornography industry.”

Linked: Human Trafficking, Prostitution, Porn Industry

The ties between human trafficking, prostitution and the pornography industry are well documented, so it is not out of line to say that the Barbados Government Minister in question has a conflict of interest. One of our own community leaders even documented the link between human trafficking and the porn film industry.

When Health Minister Donville Inniss votes against human trafficking, he votes against his own financial interests in profiting from the pornography industry.

There is also the matter of the Health Minister’s business associates, clients and friends in the pornography industry. If Minister Inniss votes against human trafficking, he’s voting against his associates and friends – and in a real way taking money from their pockets.

And let us not forget that some of the funding for Mr. Inniss’s election campaign came from his own profits from working with the pornography industry. What we don’t know is how much the DLP election campaign received from Mr. Inniss’s friends and porn business associates. Did they help out their old friend in his bid to get elected? Of course they did! You’d help out your friend if he or she stood for Parliament, wouldn’t you?

Why did the Barbados Government fail to criminalize all forms of Trafficking in Persons?

“The main obstacles to anti-trafficking progress in Barbados were: the new legislation’s failure to criminalize all forms of trafficking in persons; the government’s absence of formal procedures to guide officials in victim identification and assistance; and the absence of a formal mechanism to coordinate government and NGO actions on trafficking issues.”

… from the 2011 Trafficking in Persons Report

Donville Inniss, Democratic Labour Party

Health Minister Inniss and the Democratic Labour Party government have a big conflict of interest and a real stake in the continuing profitability of the pornography industry. Those campaign donations from Mr. Inniss’s friends in the porn business aren’t likely to continue if the DLP gets tough on human trafficking and interferes with the porn profits.

How much money are we talking?

The Orgasm.com website says it has paid out millions of dollars in advertising to online affiliate marketers. That is big money. The Orgasm.com trademark is registered to none other than Fiesta Catering International, Inc. and when you say “Fiesta”, the name of Donville Inniss is right there too.

We hate to tell you this, but it gets worse…

We’re not just talking “soft” porn here folks. As we’ve seen, Mr. Inniss’s Orgasm.com trademark pushes teen porn, pregnant women porn and we hate to tell you this (and I’m really thinking about how to write it here) but some of the Orgasm.com affiliates feature porn sites showing people and animals. I’ll leave it at that, but we’ve made photographs of the computer screen in case Mr. Inniss ever wants to write to WordPress and says we’re not telling the truth.

We are telling the truth about everything and we have the proof, but we’re sure not going to post it here. The Bajan news media won’t touch this even though the information is there in public online. That tells you something about the Bajan news media. Neither will Barbados Underground blog touch the story although they can see the information online too. That tells you something about the Barbados Underground blog too.

Over to you Prime Minister Stuart – as your Health Minister has made it clear by his silence that there is a cover-up in progress. Well, Mr. Inniss can cover up as much as he wants and change things around now, but we have all the computer screen photographs taken over a long period, so he can’t say it’s not so and WordPress isn’t about to take down this article because they can find the proof online just like we did.

Mr. Prime Minister – watcha gonna do ’bout this?

Next article: Following the money: Online porn and money laundering

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Ethics, Human Rights, Political Corruption, Politics & Corruption, Slavery

What would Sarah Ann Gill think about our silence over religious persecution in China?

“They shot tear gas at our group of 20 — some of us completely unarmed, all law-abiding religious citizens.  Wielding their batons, they beat, kicked and prodded the people.  Many police officers and plainclothes agents beat two sisters to the floor (one of the sisters is relatively advanced in age).  They passed out on the spot with foam coming from their mouths and convulsions in their hands and legs.   We demanded that they be sent to the hospital immediately.  The officials wouldn’t listen to us and continued to hit the people with their batons.”

Chinese Christians tell of police raid on an “unauthorized” house church, February 23, 2011, Zaoyang City, Hubei Province, China

Barbados National Hero risked everything to pray at her home.

Every Barbadian knows the name of Sarah Ann Gill, the only female declared as one of our country’s ten national heroes. On this National Heroes Day, we should ask ourselves if we really remember what Sarah Ann Gill did, and why she did it.

In October 1823, a mob of whites burned the Methodist Church in Barbados where Gill was a member. At that time the Methodist Church in England was in the forefront of the movement to ban slavery and that didn’t go over very well with the slave owners in Barbados.

The response of the Mother of Barbados was to open her own home for prayer services. Gill was relentlessly prosecuted by the authorities and threatened with death.

Some sources state that Gill was charged under the Conventicles Act of 1664 which forbade assembly of more than five persons for divine worship unless in a licensed meeting place and led by a licensed preacher. The act had already been repealed but that apparently didn’t stop the authorities.

Gill acquitted herself so well that the same authorities who persecuted her sent soldiers to guard her home when a mob attempted to burn it on October 19, 1824. Gill continued to hold worship services at her home and raised money for a new church.

On June 25th, 1825 The House of Commons in England declared that “ample protection and religious toleration be secured to all” – and Sarah Ann Gill and other religious dissenters secured their right to worship where they saw fit, without needing the blessing of the state.

What would Sarah Ann Gill think of Barbados cuddling up to China today? What would she think of our silence for our Christian brothers and sisters – beaten and jailed in China?

Something to consider as we look out over these fields and hills on National Heroes Day.

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Filed under Barbados, China, History, Human Rights, Religion, Slavery