Category Archives: Slavery

Barbados Minister of International Business Donville Inniss: Swiss Bank Account for your online porn business?

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Revealed for the first time: Donville Inniss Swiss Money Connection

An interesting article in yesterday’s Nation Newspaper where Donville Inniss, our Minister of International Business, announced that Barbados is fully on board with the US and international efforts to have an automatic exchange of tax information between countries.

Some folks would say that Barbados is caving to the USA’s extortion, but others would say this is the future and welcome to it.

Of course, some folks would also question where the customers are going to come from if keeping money in Barbados is the same as having a bank account in Chicago or London. Why should anyone do their banking in Bim if there is no advantage?

“. . . My ministry has written to the secretary general of the OECD in Paris indicating that Barbados has formally committed to signing on to the automatic exchange of tax information,” Inniss said. “This is important because as a government there is somewhat of a paradigm shift in taking a position that Barbados needs to be a player, and to be seen as a major player in this international financial services sector where it matters most.”

… Nation News Bowing to Global Pressure

Barbados Sex Trafficking

What about all Donville’s porn profits?

This concern with international tax treaties is a newish thing for Pornville, er, Donville.

You see, not so many years ago, Barbados Free Press caught out Donville Inniss in the act of profiteering from online pornography.

“One of the saddest things I’ve ever seen is Orgasm.com’s pregnant woman porn section. How does Donville Inniss feel about these desperate young girls – making money for him like this?” 

Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Ethics, Political Corruption, Politics & Corruption, Slavery

On Emancipation Day we party while millions are still held as slaves in China, North Korea, Africa and throughout the Muslim world

What king of place is this?

Modern Slave Stories…

Mende Nazer

Simon Deng

The signs of Modern Slavery

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Slavery

After years of denial, Bajan Reporter Ian Bourne finally admits that Islam and the Koran makes Western society “more dangerous, less tolerant, less civilised and less free”

It has been four years since Ian Bourne fell into his own trap and posted a cartoon of Jesus giving the finger, but then wouldn’t post a cartoon of Mohammed giving the finger… and then Bourne took down the Jesus cartoon so he wouldn’t be seen as a hypocrite for insulting Jesus but not Mohammed.

For years Bourne criticised BFP for asking questions about how the Koran and Islam mandate killing of unbelievers and former Muslims, about the lesser status of women in Islam, about how the Koran says it takes four women to equal one man witness, about how Muslims should hate Jews, about how the Koran and Islam instruct slavery, rape and submission of non-Muslims.

And now Bajan Reporter publishes Pat Condell’s latest video Nothing to do with Islam.

Could it be that Ian has had an epiphany?

If so… good for Ian.

If not… pass me another Banks beer baby!

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Religion, Slavery

Sheri Veronica – As school children in Barbados we were taught to hate Jamaicans

Sheri Veronica Barbados

“Respect Jamaicans”

by Sheri Veronica

THE TRUTH IS, we were taught to hate JAMAICANS.  As a little girl in primary school, our teacher taught us that Barbados was the jewel of the Caribbean.  We were taught that any mad/crazy slave or any slave who could not take instructions, were shipped off to Jamaica.  This was the mandate, I supposed in my little head (or was that taught to me also), of every Caribbean island.  Send the mad and **aggressive slaves to Jamaica.  Then as time passed and you start to see clearer, meet people and question things, you soon realize that the insurgent slaves were the brave ones.  They were the men and women who could not be broken…

… continue with a good read at Sheri Veronica’s blog

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Filed under Africa, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Jamaica, Race, Slavery, Sugar

Reader asks for assistance in planning a Barbados Red Legs tour

Barbados Red Legs

Dear Barbados Free Press

I will be coming to Barbados in February, 2015. I’ve always wanted to visit as I have an interest in the Red Leg people and the history of the Irish who were sent to Barbados by Oliver Cromwell.  I hope to take back a tour group with me in 2016 to show them the island with particular emphasis on its Irish history. I’m wondering if there are any locations that I could visit that might have some connection with this history and with the descendants of the Red Legs.

(Name withheld by editor)

AN ESTIMATED 50,000 “white slaves” were transported from Ireland to Barbados between 1652 and 1657. Having succeeded in recruiting Irish men to die in the services of France, Spain, Poland and Italy, Cromwell turned his attention to others – men and women press-ganged by soldiers, taken to Cork and shipped to Bristol where they were sold as slaves and transported to Barbados.

… see BFP’s article Irish Times: Most Barbados Red Legs have bad or no teeth.

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, History, Slavery

Jodie Kidd stages Yarico: “The shame of slavery in the Caribbean”

Jodie John Kidd Barbados

“The story has its origins, however, in around 1650, when traveller Richard Ligon met a female Amerindian slave in Barbados and returned to England to write A True and Exact History of the Island of Barbados, telling of “poor Yarico” who “for her love, lost her liberty”.

It’s a musical. Don’t know what to think about it because I haven’t seen it, but I lost my liberty for love one time. Lost a house too.

Somehow, I don’t think that’s what they are talking about in Yarico.

Jodie’s quotes in the Guardian are interesting because they totally ignore the issue of white historical privilege in Barbados.

Yes… we’re free, but the old boys still control the money and the economy… and where they don’t, the new black political elites are gaining fast. The ordinary man, especially the light skinned mixed-race man, has not progressed in Bim since about 1960. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

Robert, BFP

“When I was at school in Barbados I did learn about the history of the island, but there was not much sense of a racial problem when I was growing up because it is such a modern island and has people from all over the world coming in and out all the time,” she said. “More than any other of the islands in the Caribbean, it has always been super popular. So when it came to racial conflict, I didn’t really get to see any one incident of it as I grew up.”

Jodie Kidd quoted in the Guardian article, Jodie Kidd brings story of love and slavery to the London stage

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A Bit of Barbados History: 1855 letter to W.W. Somerville, 69th Regiment of Foot in Barbados

barbados letter 1855 front  (click photo for large)

by Cliverton

There was a time on this rock when governments, both colonial and post-independence, did everything they could to erase every vestige of our origins. It was almost as if some people thought we could progress only if we forgot about the past. What foolishness!

Our government left gorgeous plantation houses and noble public buildings to rot – forgetting (or maybe not forgetting) just who built these structures: slaves and the children of slaves. Not satisfied with destroying historical buildings, they also let the humidity, salt air and rot take care of books, letters and historical objects. The destruction was so long term and widespread that it simply must have been deliberate.

It is true to say that much of Barbados history has faded away irrecoverably – gone forever.

So it is that when I see a tangible bit of Bajan history I get excited, because I know that with a little bit of work on the internet I will discover so much more about this piece of soil where my navel string is buried.

Today’s discovery is offered by Scotia Philately – a letter to Medical Doctor W. W. Somerville of the 69th Regiment in Barbados, West Indies postmarked September 2, 1855 at Plymouth and stamped received in Barbados on September 21, 1855. That’s nineteen days from England to Barbados, a distance of 3504 nautical miles for an average speed of 7.5 knots postal stamp to postal stamp. Meaning that the Royal Mail sailing vessel probably averaged over 10 knots on the journey. Clippers (fast sailing vessels on the mail and opium runs) could easily make 13 or 14 knots and maintain that speed in all but the worst weather.

Who was Doctor Somerville and why was the 69th Regiment of Foot in Barbados? (or “Barbadoes” as it was then called.)
Continue reading

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How Bridgetown built the economic foundation of the British Empire – only to be discarded when the profits were gone.

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Slavery Reparations have never interested me because I know that whatever we receive will never be enough for the victims class, and that anything we do receive will be stolen by the political class. No reparations will ever touch my hand. No amount of reparations will provide a steady flow of clean water from my pipes or establish a modern sustainable economy.

Britain could pay us 10 billion pounds and not one new hospital bed or surgery will appear at that slum we call the Queen Elizabeth Hospital – or anywhere else. A trillion pounds will not erase the arrogance of government employees towards citizens, nor will it cure the ‘Island Time’ syndrome that makes foreign business investors run like mad from the Caribbean once they get over the rum, sun and sand.

Barbados is incapable of receiving and delivering reparations honestly and effectively for the general good.

Whose fault is that? I’m not sure, but I do know that at one time Barbados was the driving economic force and secure military base that built and maintained the British Empire.

Whatever Tristram Hunt has written in his new book Ten Cities that Made an Empire, he’s probably 50% correct and 50% nonsense. After all this time, who can say?

But I look forward to the read.

Cliverton

Ten Cities that Made an Empire by Tristram Hunt, review: ‘enthralling and compelling’

A fascinating account of 10 cities that were shaped by, and helped shape, British rule

Bridgetown, Barbados has always held a particular appeal for the British. The legacy of empire is all too apparent, and is, indeed, exploited for tourists. The series of historical attractions based on Plantation House present, as Tristram Hunt writes, “a sepia version of the colonial past”. Nostalgia for cricket, rum cocktails and the old plantation lifestyle trumps the blood-drenched history of slavery on the island. Bridgetown is a modern city, but the colonial memory continues to reverberate.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Human Rights, Slavery

Barbados Red Legs flag – A symbol of cultural affirmation

Barbados Red Legs Flag

Barbados Red-Legs can now boast their own cultural flag

“I know as an outsider, no symbology can be foisted onto another culture;

yet my humble offering might spark the imagination of someone who is from there, and inspire some movement toward cultural affirmation.”

contributed by Three-fold Now

The Red Legs are a cultural community in the Caribbean island of Barbados. They are descendants of Irish and Scottish indentured servants—some forcibly enslaved by Cromwell—and remain as “poor whites” in what is otherwise a predominantly Afro-Caribbean nation. The performer Rihanna claims some family ties to this Irish-Barbadian lineage.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Slavery

Barbados government sells Four Seasons to investors from slave nation Qatar

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Qatar is a slave-nation in the 21st Century

Barbados Today is reporting that the government is selling the abandoned Barbados Four Seasons hotel project to a Qatar-based investment group.

Qatar, of course, is dependent upon slave labour to keep its economy and building boom rolling along. The Qatar slavery horror stories are legion. There is no question, no argument against, no misunderstanding. Qatar is a slave state in the 21st Century. (However, being a Muslim nation, Qatar knows that contemporary slavery is both sanctioned and ordered by the Koran, along with abductions and forced-conversions to Islam.)

So let there be no misunderstanding about this either: The descendants of Bajan slaves are happy to do business with modern day slavers.

Money trumps human rights on this rock, and we’ll do anything to get more.

Slavery reparations for Bajans? What a joke. Will Qatar slaves come after Barbados some day for reparations? As we’ve said here from the beginning: Spend any reparations payments to free current slaves.

There are more slaves today than at any other time in history; yet Barbados is about to shake hands with Qatar slave owners.

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Qatar FIFA World Cup built upon slavery

“Qatar is a slave state in the 21st Century…”

“I am trapped here. The main office will not give me back my passport…”

“How many people are going to have to die so that this World Cup can take place?”

The Guardian: Qatar’s World Cup Slaves

“The evidence uncovered by the Guardian is clear proof of the use of systematic forced labour in Qatar. In fact, these working conditions and the astonishing number of deaths of vulnerable workers go beyond forced labour to the slavery of old where human beings were treated as objects.

There is no longer a risk that the World Cup might be built on forced labour. It is already happening.”

Aidan McQuade, director of Anti-Slavery International

 

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Chinese government continues persecution of Christians, Barbados continues begging for Chinese handouts

April 28, 2014 - Chinese government destroys 6-year old Sanjiang Church. Fifty percent of China's slaves are religious prisoners.

April 28, 2014 – Chinese government destroys 6-year old Sanjiang Church. Fifty percent of China’s slaves are religious prisoners.

Trading Bajan silence on Christian persecution for cash

Remind me… What was that verse about the ‘love of money’ ?

We Bajans are so selective in our outrage. Worse than Americans really – for if the Americans ban products from Cuba while still doing business with China, the largest single human rights violator in the world, at least the US Government criticizes China’s government for slave camps and other violations of human rights, even as the US continues to do business.

Bajans, however, remain silent about China’s ongoing human rights violations.

How can it be that Barbados – a country founded upon slavery, whips, rape, kidnapping and all manner of human misery – remains silent about China, a country that still maintains the largest slave camp system in the world? How can our government say nothing about the Chinese government kidnapping pregnant women and forcing abortions as government officials hold down screaming mothers? How can we say nothing about China destroying hundreds of Christian churches and imprisoning millions because of their religious beliefs?

The answer is this: The Chinese government purchases Bajan silence in exchange for gifts of cash, travel and material goods. It is in the economic interests of our Government and of certain businesses and individual Bajans to forget about China’s slave camps, religious persecution, forced abortion and infanticide.

And so we remain silent, and even embrace Barbados China friendship.

Further Reading

Telegraph: China accused of anti-Christian campaign as church demolition begins

Telegraph: Christians form human shield around church in China

Daily Mail: Woman finds letter from Chinese slave

NY Times: China’s forced labor

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Filed under Barbados, China, Human Rights, Slavery

Infanticide by Barbados slave mothers – an expression of resistance?

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It is truly disturbing to think that Bajan mothers murdered their own newborns as an act of rebellion to deny human slave assets to their captors and owners.

We know that as the Atlantic slave trade and supplies of new slaves dried up due to the efforts of abolitionists, plantation owners in the Caribbean and USA placed the emphasis on breeding new stock. The record is clear that some plantation owners thought it their right to impregnate their slaves with white blood for ‘better product’.

It is difficult to think that captive human beings were treated as property to this extent, but that was the reality of the day. The master had all rights, the female slave had none.

As you read the following article, just remember this…

There are more slaves held in captivity today than at any other time in history.

The obvious response to slave infanticide is to conceptualize it as an act of desperation, a sad act, or an act of altruism, in the sense that it was intended to save enslaved children from a life of hard labor, degradation, and physical, sexual, and mental abuse.

But what if slave infanticide, in all its horror, was an expression of resistance? To conceptualize it this way places agency back in the hands of the slave women who killed their children, because it assumes that their decision was actively, discursively antagonistic and insurrectionary.

… from Infanticide as Slave Resistance: Evidence from Barbados

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Anti-gay laws undermine CARICOM’s slavery reparations demands

Execution Blacks Gays Lesbians Slavery

Homosexuals executed in Iran, Blacks lynched in USA

Human Rights are Human Rights: whether denied upon skin colour or sexual orientation

by Sean Macleish
Caribbean Alliance for Equality

Prime Minister, Ralph Gonsalves, the current chair of CARICOM (Caribbean Community Secretariat) along with other Caribbean leaders who are continuing to cultivate and place a high discount rate on the lives of their lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) citizens are helping to mortgage the region’s future with atrophy, by retarding the growth of their nations in exchange for power by majority rule. Social inclusion, equality and open diversity foster environments where everyone can bring their best to the table and feel valued without incurring the costs associated with repression.

In 2014, 12 of the 15 CARICOM member states still criminalize homosexuality.

Suriname is one of the remaining member states that has legalized homosexuality since 1869. Social economics has many costs and the archaic philosophy of legalized oppression is counterproductive to investing in a nation’s greatest asset; it’s people. In February, referring to the costs of homophobia, President of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim stated, “Institutionalized discrimination is bad for people and societies. Widespread discrimination is also bad for economies. There is clear evidence that when societies enact laws that prevent productive people from fully participating in the workforce, economies suffer.”  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Slavery

Barbados China Friendship Association – Happy to not talk about China’s slave camps, forced abortions

Long-time readers of Barbados Free Press will remember that our founding editor Marcus (passed in 2013 and greatly missed) had a special place in his heart for the millions of Christians and others imprisoned as slaves in modern China’s Laogai slave camps. Marcus also wrote about the horrific forced abortions where Chinese mothers are kidnapped off the street, and held down while their babies are ripped from their wombs and killed.

All at the direction of the Chinese Communist government.

“In Communist China, the authorities kidnap pregnant women from the street, hold them down and abort their babies.

That is the government were talking about. The same government that has been showering gifts and financial aid upon Barbados in order to win our votes at the United Nations.

Shiu Yon Zhou knows this first hand. Her story is one you will not forget.”

from BFP’s Mother Jumps From Second Story Window To Escape Forced Abortion By Communist Chinese Government

Difficult to believe? Don’t believe an anonymous blog like BFP! Do some research yourself. Here are a few past BFP articles to get you started…

September 10, 2010: Barbados silent about China kidnapping, forcing late term abortions, sterilizations on 7000 women

November 3, 2009: Barbados students forge special bond with imprisoned Chinese pastor – through footballs made in slave labour camps

November 28, 2008: China’s New Slave Empire: Africa

June 28, 2006: Slave Labour Camps “Vital Part of Chinese Economy” – Should Barbados Take Gifts From Communist China?

Meanwhile… if you’d like to learn Chinese and join the Barbados China Friendship Association, here are the details. Just keep quiet about the slavery and forced abortions, okay?  Continue reading

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Internet pornography kills love, warps young minds and sustains slavery.

Donville Inniss associated website: Pregnant women porn at Orgasm.com

Government Minister Donville Inniss associated website: Pregnant women porn at Orgasm.com …CLICK PHOTO FOR DETAILS AND STORY…

by Grenville Phillips II

by Grenville Phillips II

Pornography is now easily available to all school children who have access to a tablet or a smart phone.  It is facilitated by persons who allow unrestricted access to the Internet in their homes or at the many Wi-Fi hotspots around Barbados.  So let me share a solution; but first, let me describe the problem.

Pornography has two main damaging effects.  The impact for viewers is that that they can primarily view sexual intercourse as a means to satisfy themselves rather than satisfying their partners.  For male viewers, this can lead to a less satisfying sexual experience for her and a boring routine for him.  He will likely develop an uncaring attitude towards her if she does not express a similar delight in his sexual performance as those whom he watches.  His sexual experience should be all about satisfying her, and her sexual experience should be all about satisfying him.

The most damaging impact is on the victims whom the watchers are viewing.  Many women, especially from Asian and eastern European countries, are forced into the sex slave trade, with harsh consequences if they do not show delight when raped (See ‘Half the Sky’ and other research into sex slavery).  As the watchers view these victims, they are supporting and sustaining this slavery.  If people choose not to pay to view pornography on the Internet, then they still support and sustain the sex slave trade by adding to the web sites’ page views, which increases their potential advertising revenues.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Ethics, Government, Human Rights, Politics & Corruption, Slavery

Bajan Roots: Looking for historical information about the Byram family in Barbados

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Dear Barbados Free Press,

I would like to learn about the history or origin of the Surname BYRAM in Barbados.

My ancestor, Nicholas Byram was born in Kent, England about 1610. He was in Barbados sometime during the period 1620 – 1635.

I have found in Facebook two persons with the surname Byram who have family roots in Barbados but one, a lifeguard named Selena Byram, worked at a beach in Barbados and was killed by a shark. The other person’s grandparents lived in Barbados but had no knowledge of the history of their Byram surname.

Jerry Byram

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“Cumba” – the story of one slave woman owned by Captain John Burch, Christ Church. From Africa to Barbados to England

slavery-barbados.jpg

“Mr. Maverick was desirous to have a breed of Negroes, and therefore seeing she would not yield by perswasions to company with a Negro young man he had in his house…”

… from John Josselyn as recounted in Two Voyages to New England, published 1674

One story of millions

by West Side Davie

“Cumba” was her name. She died a slave in Romford, England in April, 1668 – the property of John Burch and his wife Margaret of Hogsty Plantation. (I’m not sure whether Captain John Burch of Barbados is also referred to and is the same as Colonel John Burch of Barbados, but this family history and other websites seem to say it is the same man. I remain open for correction!)

Today, Cumba is remembered as Havering’s first black resident in an excellent article by Professor Ged Martin just published in the Romford Recorder:

It was 350 years ago this year that a fabulously rich couple, John and Margaret Burch, arrived in Romford.

They’d made their money in Barbados, exploiting slave labour to produce the bonanza crop: sugar.

In 1664, they retired to England, buying Romford’s biggest estate, Gidea Hall, then usually called Giddy Hall. The mansion, demolished in 1930, stood just east of Raphael Park.

Madam Burch, as she was fawningly called, brought her personal maidservant from Barbados, the ultimate status symbol.

Cumba was Havering’s first black resident. A slave, a piece of property, Cumba survived the English climate just four years.

But when she died, in April 1668, somebody had the humanity to record her name in the register of Romford’s St Edward’s church. “Cumber, a ffemale Blackamore servant from Guyddy Hall, buried.”

Today, “blackamore” is an offensive term. But in 1668, when “black” was used to ­describe complexion, it was an attempt to identify Cumba with some dignity. The double “ff” ­indicated a capital letter.

… read the entire article Cumba: Havering’s first black resident remembered on the 350th anniversary of her arrival.

We know very little about Cumba, but we still know far more about her than we do about millions of other people who were enslaved with her and since. We know about the times in which she lived, and we also know a little about the socially-condoned cruelty of slave owners. I believe that much of history has been ‘cleansed’, but not all of it. What passed for ‘normal’ and ‘acceptable’ when Cumba lived gives us some idea of her personal circumstances, what she probably saw even if she was not herself subject to all of the abuses. We simply don’t know the details of her life, but we know the times.

So to learn more about Cumba, we will talk of the people around her: the powerful elites of society at the time… Continue reading

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Filed under Africa, Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Human Rights, Race, Slavery