Category Archives: Immigration

Islamic Supremacist lectures Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands

In 2011, Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands attended a concert in the capitol, The Hague. A Muslim (some stories say he was the conductor, others dispute this) proceeds to give the Queen a lecture on the “beauty” of Islam. The entire orchestra got up and walked out. Staff of the music hall escorted the man off-stage and after questioning, out of the building. Some stories state that the concert continued after the theatre was checked for bombs.

Thanks to an old friend for sending this.

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Filed under Human Rights, Immigration, Religion

40 years ago Barbados teenager Marcia Rollins went to England to become a nurse

Black Caribbean nurses made a huge difference in England’s National Health Service

Marcia Rollins is from Barbados. She always wanted to be a nurse but opportunities were limited on the island so when the UK needed new recruits she joined thousands of other Caribbean people and left for the ‘mother country’.

“It was always my dream to be a nurse. England was seen as the mother country and there were opportunities in England moreso than here in Barbados to do nursing.

I was terrified but full of hope for the future…

My plans were to go there and study nursing and get back to Barbados as fast as I could.”

Marcia was just 19 when she arrived in England and intended to return to Barbados soon after her training finished. She actually ended up spending 40 years in the NHS making a unique and valuable contribution as a Registered Nurse and gaining a diploma in health care. She retired in 2008 and moved back to Barbados.

“It was always my dream to be a nurse. England was seen as the mother country and there were opportunities in England moreso than here in Barbados to do nursing.

I was terrified by full of hope for the future…

My plans were to go there and study nursing and get back to Barbados as fast as I could.

You had things that weren’t very nice – Get back to the Jungle. Take your black hands off me. Things like that were said to you. To be quite honest, I didn’t let things like that bother me…”

Then I had a family… two small children and going back to Barbados was a far dream. I have no regrets. I consider England to be a University of Life.”

Read the entire story at Black Union Jack

Also from the same era, see BFP’s Bajan Ralph Straker passes in the UK – One of thousands recruited from the Caribbean by London Transport in the 1950s

 

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Immigration, Race

Why weren’t charges laid in attack upon Barbados Immigration Officer?

walter maloney Barbados

We might be wrong here, folks. We HOPE that we are wrong.

BUT… we have two people telling us that a foreigner punched out a Bajan Immigration officer at the airport …. and that management backed away and laid no charges. The Immigration officer is still on sick leave but no charges were laid.

WTF?

Yes. Exactly.

President of the National Union of Public Workers Walter Maloney confirmed much of the story at a symposium at Workplace Violence Awareness Day.

So what is the story? Let’s hear it!

above: Walter “lots of excuses” Maloney; President of the National Union of Public Punching Bags.

Go figure… Immigration officer attacked 

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Filed under Barbados, Blogging, Business, Environment, Ethics, Freedom Of Information, Grenada, Immigration

Visa waiver for El Salvador a foolish decision by Barbados Government

 

El Salvador Barbados

“In El Salvador, Sanchez found an environment where gang culture was thriving. Just two years earlier, the Chapultepec Peace Accords had ended more than a decade of civil war, but the country remained violent. The homicide rate stood at 139 per 100,000 in 1995 — far higher than any country in the world today. El Salvador’s public institutions were hobbled and its families broken up by both war and migration.”

… Huffington Post: How the U.S. sparked a refugee crisis on the Border

What possible benefit is there to Barbados?

Riddle me this…

  • Barbados has just signed a visa waiver agreement with El Salvador. El Salvadorian citizens can now come to Barbados without a visa and without the pre-approval process that part of the visa application.
  • El Salvador is one of the most violent countries in Central America – struggling to recover from decades of civil war, death squads, revenge and criminal gangs.
  • There is a documented steady flow of illegal migrants / refugees / child soldiers from El Salvador to the USA and other countries in the region. People are desperate to leave El Salvador, and any cursory google search shows why.
  • Due to government corruption, societal violence and hostile policies against business, El Salvador has the lowest level of foreign investment in any Central American country. Homicides, kidnappings and extortions increased over 30% in 2009.

So what are we gaining? Does the upside justify the risk?

Welcome to the rule of the Bajan political class… Shut up. Sit down and don’t ask any of these damning and inconvenient questions!

Further Reading

August 12, 2014: The Deadly, Invisible Borders Inside El Salvador

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Filed under Barbados, Immigration

Barbados Finance Minister says redundant public employees should work for Trinidad & Tobago government

“We’re encouraging people to look for opportunities beyond Barbados and there are Caribbean territories that require that skilled labour. A lot of skilled labour from Barbados come here (to T&T). They go back and forth, and we are encouraging them to look for those opportunities.”

Barbados Finance Minister Christopher Sinckler speaking to T&T bankers

Leroy Parris and good friend Finance Minister Chris Sinckler share champagne

Leroy Parris and good friend Finance Minister Chris Sinckler share champagne – file photo

We’ve seen the cycle repeated for a long, long time. Barbados has way more people than this little rock can accommodate in space, resources and economy – so anytime in our history when there is a pull-back in the economy (as there is now), thousands of Bajans leave for better circumstances.

That happened when the Panama Canal was being carved from the jungle at the cost of 500 dead Bajans per mile, and it happened in the 1950’s and 1960’s when the lure of working in the UK took thousands of our best and brightest people away – most never to return.

Who leaves Barbados during these migrations?       Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Disaster, Economy, History, Immigration, Island Life, Trinidad and Tobago

Murder of former Barbados Immigration Chief Kenrick Hutson now six years cold

Barbados Murder Gun Revolver 3

Six years ago on December 28, 2007, retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, aged 74, was murdered at the front of his home on a Friday evening as his wife and daughter were inside.

The killer’s trail has long grown cold and the police question how a man who retired 14 years previously could have been an assassin’s target over something that happened while he was either on the police force or head of Immigration.

It doesn’t seem square though – a 74 year old long retired man doesn’t get shot down as he reads the newspaper on the verandah with family and neighbours right there.

The murder of a former Chief Immigration Officer raises all kinds of concerns and questions. Obviously a man of Hutson’s experience and service would have made some enemies in a post where he was in charge of Immigration processing, investigations, charges and deportations. But Hutson was retired, and presumably would have little input or influence into current immigration matters.

IF his murder is associated with his service as Chief Immigration Officer, it would seem that it was either revenge for some past action – or to prevent Hutson from testifying or revealing information about something he knew.

Somebody knows something. There was a reason for this murder.

After two years of intense investigation, the murder of retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, still remains a mystery to Police Investigators. Kenrick Hutson was a family man, a father of three children and husband of Coreen for over 44 years. He had a reputation of being a true gentleman among his peers and was well liked in his community and club circles.

Friends and relatives can think of no incident during his tenure as a Police Officer and Chief Immigration Officer that can be attributed as being a motive for his murder, 14 years into his retirement. However, on Friday December 28th 2007, at 6.50 pm Kenrick Hutson was murdered at his home located on Butlers Avenue, Spooners Hill, St. Michael.

Investigations indicate that the assailant walked from the direction of Codrington Hill, turned left into Butlers Avenue and proceeded to the Hutson residence. At the time of the incident, Mr. Hutson aged 74 was sitting on his verandah reading the daily newspapers, when the assailant entered the yard through the open front gate, climbed the steps leading to the verandah and shot Mr. Hutson several times about the body. The assailant then existed through the front gate and was seen running along Butlers Avenue towards Codrington Hill.

The assailant was identified as having a slim build, and dark complexion. He was wearing a whitish shirt, dark coloured pants and a cap with the peak facing front.

Crime Stoppers: March 17, 2010

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Immigration, Police

Journalist looks for help on Barbados Death Boat story

Barbados Death Boat.jpg

“I would like to send to my family in Bassada (a town in western Senegal) a sum of money. Please excuse me and goodbye. This is the end of my life in this big Moroccan sea,”

… victim Diao Souncar Dieme wrote his goodbyes.

In May of 2006 Bajan fisherfolk discovered a rusted steel-hulled yacht drifting to the east of Barbados. A grisly sight awaited them when they boarded, for the boat was a floating coffin carrying the mummified remains of 11 poor souls – all that was left of the 52 passengers who started the journey from Senegal to the Cape Verde Islands.

Bajans took the boat to shore, buried the bodies and held an inquest in 2009. Somewhere along the way European authorities arrested two people, but we never heard the result of the charges or anything more about the sad events.

Now, Spanish journalist Juan Manuel Pardellas is coming to Barbados on the last step of his mission to tell the story of the 52 people who perished on the death boat. Mr. Pardellas has already been to Senegal and met the families and he’d like to meet and talk with anyone in Barbados who can bring the final pieces of his story to completion…

Dear Barbados Free Press and readers,

 I will visit your island from 27th July to 6th August. I am a Spanish journalist and would like to meet with anyone who can help me to gather all possible information about the story of the 11 Senegalese boys found dead in the yacht in 2006. I have travelled to Senegal and met all the families. and Barbados is the last step in my work. Perhaps you can help me and let me meet some people of your beautiful island who worked hard to know the truth.

God bless you,

Juan Manuel Pardellas

Email: pardellasweb@gmail.com
Website: http://www.canarias3puntocero.com

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Immigration

Shanique Myrie inquiry – Barbados environmental officer part of Immigration scam?

Barbados_Immigration_illegal

Questions about Barbados Environmental Officer Daniel Forde

by One Who Knows

The story is still developing but from the reports in the local news, questions are being asked about the role of Daniel Forde “a senior government environmental officer” in the Shanique Myrie fiasco.

Jamaican Myrie was denied entry into Barbados and held in Immigration custody. She has alleged mistreatment by Bajan authorities, including being “finger raped” during a search for drugs.

Bajan Pamela Clarke testified that neighbour Daniel Forde asked her to be available when his friend Myrie arrived from Jamaica in case Mryrie couldn’t get hold of Forde. But while Clarke agreed to this she did not know that Myrie was providing her name and address as the person who invited her to Barbados and where she would be staying.

Myrie lied to Immigration officers, saying that she had been talking to Pamela Clarke on the internet for two months. That was not true as they had never spoken or emailed.

Barbados drug search

Although Bajan government official Daniel Forde had something to do with Shanique Myrie traveling to Barbados, it seems Forde and Myrie did not want the Immigration officials to know that.

Why Not?

Testimony says that Myrie lied to Immigration Officials about her relationship with Pamela Clarke, and so far it testimony says that Myrie didn’t offer Forde’s name as her real host.

So Myrie was not truthful with Immigration and Forde was in on that plan to not be truthful. That is what it looks like so far.

Why weren’t Forde and Myrie straight with Immigration officials? Is this about human trafficking and Forde, a Barbados government official, is involved? Is this about Myrie is his little squeeze on the side that Forde didn’t want someone else to know about? Or is it something altogether innocent, mistakes made because somebody assumed something and said the wrong thing?

There’s more questions than answers right now, but if it shapes up that Forde was part of some plan to not tell the truth to Immigration, then Bajans should be asking themselves if Forde should keep that nice cushy government job of his.

The inquiry continues…

BFP’s readers can head over to Barbados Today as that news source has published many articles about Shanique Myrie. Check out Never knew Myrie.

We’re going to reprint the whole article here because you know how it is folks – if we don’t sure enough the original article will change or disappear a common happening with the Bajan news media. Readers should first head over to Barbados Today as they deserve your click please.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Immigration, Jamaica

Barbados citizenship still a whimsical process where luck and who you know count more than law

by a Bajan Citizen

I am a dual citizen (my parents were both Bajan born and raised) and have been trying to register my daughter as a dual citizen in order to make it easier for her to go to University in Barbados, a desire she has had since a small child. I started the process in 2008 – I continue to go to Immigration every few months and they keep putting me off.

In 2010, after discovering that they lost the original application, I successfully resubmitted the information and still do not have any idea of a resolution. I was told at first that all was fine, but whispers are in the air that now it seems that there are some changes coming to the laws that may affect this. I was also told that there are thousands of “Citizenship by Registration” cases that this will affect – and all of these pending applications are in limbo.

It seems to be a dirty little secret that Government is holding – maybe a party issue that will be raised in the next election? The people have a right to know! And for me, the laws of 2008 are what my particular application should be judged against. Why hold onto applications while you decided if you are going to change the law?

Barbados Free Press, please post this issue so that others like me can have some idea of what is going on – maybe a reader has some insight. My Bajan bloodline is one that my daughter and I respect with pride. It represents a legacy of my ancestors is one that I hope will not end with me (though she does plan to move back one day to have her first child to refresh our Bajan roots-by-law).

Immigration Reform: Another aborted DLP promise

Back in October 2009, then Prime Minister David Thompson placed before Parliament and the nation a paper “A Comprehensive Review of Immigration Policy and Proposals for Legislative Reform”. Thompson revealed that many immigration cases hadn’t been touched in 12 years and that the whole process was “whimsical” and dependent not upon law or rules, but upon the discretion of government employees.

Prime Minister Thompson said that the issue was “urgent”.

And in typical government fashion on this rock that was the last that was heard of that.

We must not forget though that the chaos of our immigration system was built by the Barbados Labour Party under Owen Arthur. The DLP merely carried on the fine tradition started by King Arthur.

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Filed under Barbados, Immigration

Barbados Bar Association President says “FREE RAUL GARCIA – he’s Bajan!”

Barbados has been holding Raul Garcia in prison illegally for the last two years. So say our courts and the United Nations.

Prime Minister Freundel Stuart lied about releasing Mr. Garcia just so he would stop his hunger strike that was gathering worldwide attention. Nobody seems to care that this nation founded by the descendants of slaves doesn’t care about human rights.

Now the President of the Barbados Bar Association says enough is enough: Raul Garcia is Bajan. He’s been here longer than many of our citizens, he’s made himself useful, developed his talent for painting and can probably not only support himself, but help to build this country.

LET HIM GO.

Ian Bourne tracked down Barbados Bar Association President Andrew Pilgrim (photo above courtesy of The Nation) and reports what Mr. Pilgrim has to say about this ongoing human rights violation by Prime Minister Stuart and Barbados.

It’s called journalism. Too bad that the old-stream Bajan news media is so incompetent that citizens have to hear the news from a local blogger. Sad, really.

The Bajan Reporter: President of the Barbados Bar Association sees special Unit for Raul Garcia as Tax Inefficient – Let the former Convict live and work here!

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Immigration

When Barbadians emigrated to Guyana…

Some Bajans choose to forget our shared roots and history…

The period between 1863 and 1886 was the most intense period of Barbadian emigration to Guyana, but even as late as the 1920s and 1930s there were still Barbadians leaving for Guyana.  The majority of Barbadians who migrated to Guyana were cane-cutters.  The then British Guiana was a safety valve for a densely populated island such as Barbados that had limited job prospects for the mass of working class people, and little available and affordable land for the development of an independent peasantry.  The genealogies of Guyanese and Barbadians are so intertwined that it is not uncommon to learn of Guyanese who have grandparents from Barbados, and vice versa.  There are deep families ties in which, in one family, half of the children could be born in Guyana and the other half in Barbados.  My own extended family embodied this split national profile.  The familial ties are enduring, but the vicissitudes of development have been more favorable to Barbados, while the fortunes of Guyana have rendered the country less attractive by comparison in the contemporary period…

From the excellent Sunday Stabroek story Mudheads in Barbados: A Lived Experience

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Filed under Barbados, History, Immigration

Immigration debate rages on

Where does compassion stop and idiocy begin?

Two BFP regulars are squaring off in the comments section. Mark L Fenty Sr. is calling for some sensitivity for our Caribbean brothers and sisters “visiting” Barbados. Another reader, “Observer” has had enough of illegal immigration.

Observer praises the DLP government’s recent decision to restrict health care, saying “Thank God that there was a change of Government else our social services would have been under further strain to cope.”

We’ve taken editor’s license to clean up some of the spelling and missed words that happen in the heat of debate and we’ve added the titles and subtitles too. If we’ve changed any meanings, I’m sure our friends Mark and Observer will let us know.

“DING!!! Round Two. FIGHT!!!…”

Illegal immigration problem caused by a failure to police the system.

by Mark L. Fenty Sr.

To those people who believe that Barbados isn’t going to reach a state of economic decline to the point where thousands of Barbadians are going to be flooding the more prosperous islands of the Caribbean: think again. This I believe is going to be directly attributed to the antiquated tourist industry that Barbados relies on so heavily for its foreign exchange, coupled with our insensitivity toward our fellow Caribbean nationals who reside in Barbados in an illegal status. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, CARICOM, Human Rights, Immigration

Reconnecting: Looking for Jack Smith (Wilson)

Privacy vs Helping Family: Where do we draw the line?

Every so often we receive requests to help locate long lost family members. Mostly they concern past generations and folks long gone to be with the Lord and that’s an easy decision. But sometimes the people could still be around and then what should we do?

Here’s the case of grandson seeking a grandfather he’s never met. Maybe the grandfather wants his privacy, maybe not. Maybe he’d love to hear from his grandson or maybe not. Maybe the grandfather is already passed.

Last Friday we had an all things Japan day just to think about those poor folks in the middle of the earthquake and nuclear disaster. Families, children, parents gone in an instant with no chance to see each other again however briefly this side of life. Part of the day was a Japanese-made movie called “Departures” that won an Oscar for Best Foreign Film a couple of years ago.

After seeing Departures and thinking about family, I’ll take a chance and post this in the hopes that one of our two million visitors a year might be able to help. If anyone disagrees, let us know please. Otherwise let’s see if we can help out a man looking for his Bajan grandfather…

Dear Friends at Barbados Free Press,

My name is Ozzie Smith, from the U.S., Boston, Massachusetts, and I am emailing you in hopes that you can assist me and family.

The attached photo is a pic of my grandfather, whom I have never met, neither seen a pic of him until this past weekend (April 9th & 10th). Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, History, Immigration, USA

One more step towards Barbadian citizenship

Jane Shattuck-Hoyos is all excited!

We just noticed that our Yank-in-Bim friend received her Reside and Work status some six months after applying for citizenship and the girl is happy. You often hear reports of people waiting ten or twelve years for citizenship or even residence permits, so maybe things are looking up with Immigration’s efficiency.

“I’m glad citizenship isn’t easy. I’m glad it’s not a given. If everyone who wanted it was granted it, there’d be 10 million citizens of this paradise.

I am honored. (Hm, with my new status, will I have to start spelling this honoured?)”

Head on over to Planet Barbados and read Jane’s Almost a Bajan

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Filed under Barbados, Immigration

Barbados Health Care denied to visitors: Justified? Racist? Two readers have their say…

In the past week the Caribbean has been abuzz with stories and opinion pieces about the Barbados government’s decision to deny free health care to visitors – with the exception of real emergencies, of course.

Two of our readers chime in with their five and an half pennies. First up: Kammie Holder…

Barbados Health Care in The Amputation Capital of the World!

by Kammie Holder

When in Ghana a couple months ago I cannot remember seeing obese persons. What I did see were plenty of markets selling vegetables and not a brand name fast food restaurant in sight.  In Barbados our lifestyle coupled with our “progress” has led us to the enviable position of being the amputation capital of the world and the country in the Caribbean with a highest population of obese persons. Those are my observations and if the stats prove me wrong it won’t be by much. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Health, Human Rights, Immigration

Welcome home Richard!

Barbadian loses deportation appeal in USA

“Richard Carrington petitions for review of a decision of the Board of Immigration Appeals (“BIA”), which dismissed his appeal from an Immigration Judge’s (“IJ”) final removal order. For the reasons below, we will deny the petition for review.” Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Immigration

Jamaican women welcome in Barbados if they submit to a finger up their vagina?

UPDATED: March 27, 2011 10:14 pm

Barbados Government: “Shanique Myrie is lying. There was no body cavity search”

After three days of investigations, however, McClean told reporters:“There is absolutely no truth to a story carried in a Jamaican newspaper on Thursday, March 24, that a female citizen of that country was body-searched by Immigration officers on arrival at the Grantley Adams International Airport.”

In a prepared statement, she added: “Chief Immigration Officer Ms Erine Griffith has refuted this allegation made in the Jamaica Observer. She has confirmed that her department and Customs ‘have carried out extensive investigations and the claims were baseless’.”

From The Nation story: Finger Rape Claim Untrue

Shanique Myrie: “I am not lying. They are the ones who are lying”

“I am not lying. They humiliated me and searched me like I was an animal. They can carry me back to the Barbados airport and I can show you every room they took me into. I can identify the woman who defiled me. They are the ones who are lying,” she told the Sunday Observer.

Shanique Myrie in the Nation News: Jamaican Myrie plans to sue

UPDATED: March 25, 2011 3:57 am

Barbados Government says Shanique Myrie involved in Human Trafficking

“No record” of vaginal search.

The Barbados government issued a statement late last night about the Myrie incident. Does “no record” mean the vaginal search never happened or does it mean something else? We’ll be watching this story closely, but as we said before…

“Even if Ms. Myrie was suspected and then deported for good reason such as gang affiliation or crimes committed in Jamaica, she deserves to be treated with human dignity.”

That dignity is not only about ensuring that when necessary, cavity searches are performed by qualified personnel under as clean and dignified circumstances as possible, it’s also about a bare foam mattress with no bed linen, no shower etc.

Barbados scored badly in the latest Trafficking in Persons Report, so on one hand it is good to see the authorities paying attention to the problem. On the other hand, as the Trafficking in Persons Report states, one of the big problems with prosecuting the traffickers is that the first reaction by authorities is to immediately deport the witness, in this case Ms. Myrie.

It looks like our leaders need to read that Trafficking in Persons Report again because rather than charging the Bajan male trafficker mentioned by government, they sent the witness back so the trafficker will continue in business.

As the TIP Report says of Barbados:

“Law enforcement and immigration officials continued to summarily deport undocumented foreigners without determining whether they are trafficking victims, the government opened no investigations into possible cases of sex or labor trafficking, and it did not prosecute any trafficking cases during the year. Therefore, Barbados is placed on tier 2 Watch List.”

… from page 73 of the Trafficking in Persons Report 2010 (available at US Dept. of State link here)

Our original story…

Is our title really so provocative if it is the truth?

Jamaican Shanique Myrie (photo above) flew into Barbados on March 14, 2011. Upon arrival, she was strip-searched and then a female Barbados Immigration officer shoved her finger into her vagina twice while continuously spewing venom about Jamaicans, according to Ms. Myrie. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, CARICOM, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Immigration

Violent Muslims beat UK teacher “for teaching other religions to Muslim girls”

Fractured skull, knife wounds for World Religions teacher in East London Girls’ School

The violent Jihad by the world’s most dangerous totalitarian, political and religious ideology continues. After these four adherents to the religion of peace get out of jail the UK might not be able to send them back to where they came from. You see, although it is not stated one way or the other in the newspaper, there is every chance that they were born in the United Kingdom. Our own “Homegrown Terrorists” as they say.

Time to stop immigration from Muslim countries NOW.

Four men launched a horrific attack on a teacher in which they slashed his face and left him with a fractured skull because they did not approve of him teaching religion to Muslim girls.

Akmol Hussein, 26, Sheikh Rashid, 27, Azad Hussain, 25, and Simon Alam, 19, attacked Gary Smith with a Stanley knife, an iron rod and a block of cement.

“The evidence from what was said on the probe points overwhelmingly to a religious motive for this attack.”

Submitted by MUF Manchester United Fan

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Immigration, Religion