Category Archives: Immigration

Islamic Supremacist lectures Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands

In 2011, Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands attended a concert in the capitol, The Hague. A Muslim (some stories say he was the conductor, others dispute this) proceeds to give the Queen a lecture on the “beauty” of Islam. The entire orchestra got up and walked out. Staff of the music hall escorted the man off-stage and after questioning, out of the building. Some stories state that the concert continued after the theatre was checked for bombs.

Thanks to an old friend for sending this.

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Filed under Human Rights, Immigration, Religion

40 years ago Barbados teenager Marcia Rollins went to England to become a nurse

Black Caribbean nurses made a huge difference in England’s National Health Service

Marcia Rollins is from Barbados. She always wanted to be a nurse but opportunities were limited on the island so when the UK needed new recruits she joined thousands of other Caribbean people and left for the ‘mother country’.

“It was always my dream to be a nurse. England was seen as the mother country and there were opportunities in England moreso than here in Barbados to do nursing.

I was terrified but full of hope for the future…

My plans were to go there and study nursing and get back to Barbados as fast as I could.”

Marcia was just 19 when she arrived in England and intended to return to Barbados soon after her training finished. She actually ended up spending 40 years in the NHS making a unique and valuable contribution as a Registered Nurse and gaining a diploma in health care. She retired in 2008 and moved back to Barbados.

“It was always my dream to be a nurse. England was seen as the mother country and there were opportunities in England moreso than here in Barbados to do nursing.

I was terrified by full of hope for the future…

My plans were to go there and study nursing and get back to Barbados as fast as I could.

You had things that weren’t very nice – Get back to the Jungle. Take your black hands off me. Things like that were said to you. To be quite honest, I didn’t let things like that bother me…”

Then I had a family… two small children and going back to Barbados was a far dream. I have no regrets. I consider England to be a University of Life.”

Read the entire story at Black Union Jack

Also from the same era, see BFP’s Bajan Ralph Straker passes in the UK – One of thousands recruited from the Caribbean by London Transport in the 1950s

 

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Immigration, Race

Why weren’t charges laid in attack upon Barbados Immigration Officer?

walter maloney Barbados

We might be wrong here, folks. We HOPE that we are wrong.

BUT… we have two people telling us that a foreigner punched out a Bajan Immigration officer at the airport …. and that management backed away and laid no charges. The Immigration officer is still on sick leave but no charges were laid.

WTF?

Yes. Exactly.

President of the National Union of Public Workers Walter Maloney confirmed much of the story at a symposium at Workplace Violence Awareness Day.

So what is the story? Let’s hear it!

above: Walter “lots of excuses” Maloney; President of the National Union of Public Punching Bags.

Go figure… Immigration officer attacked 

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Filed under Barbados, Blogging, Business, Environment, Ethics, Freedom Of Information, Grenada, Immigration

Visa waiver for El Salvador a foolish decision by Barbados Government

 

El Salvador Barbados

“In El Salvador, Sanchez found an environment where gang culture was thriving. Just two years earlier, the Chapultepec Peace Accords had ended more than a decade of civil war, but the country remained violent. The homicide rate stood at 139 per 100,000 in 1995 — far higher than any country in the world today. El Salvador’s public institutions were hobbled and its families broken up by both war and migration.”

… Huffington Post: How the U.S. sparked a refugee crisis on the Border

What possible benefit is there to Barbados?

Riddle me this…

  • Barbados has just signed a visa waiver agreement with El Salvador. El Salvadorian citizens can now come to Barbados without a visa and without the pre-approval process that part of the visa application.
  • El Salvador is one of the most violent countries in Central America – struggling to recover from decades of civil war, death squads, revenge and criminal gangs.
  • There is a documented steady flow of illegal migrants / refugees / child soldiers from El Salvador to the USA and other countries in the region. People are desperate to leave El Salvador, and any cursory google search shows why.
  • Due to government corruption, societal violence and hostile policies against business, El Salvador has the lowest level of foreign investment in any Central American country. Homicides, kidnappings and extortions increased over 30% in 2009.

So what are we gaining? Does the upside justify the risk?

Welcome to the rule of the Bajan political class… Shut up. Sit down and don’t ask any of these damning and inconvenient questions!

Further Reading

August 12, 2014: The Deadly, Invisible Borders Inside El Salvador

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Filed under Barbados, Immigration

Barbados Finance Minister says redundant public employees should work for Trinidad & Tobago government

“We’re encouraging people to look for opportunities beyond Barbados and there are Caribbean territories that require that skilled labour. A lot of skilled labour from Barbados come here (to T&T). They go back and forth, and we are encouraging them to look for those opportunities.”

Barbados Finance Minister Christopher Sinckler speaking to T&T bankers

Leroy Parris and good friend Finance Minister Chris Sinckler share champagne

Leroy Parris and good friend Finance Minister Chris Sinckler share champagne – file photo

We’ve seen the cycle repeated for a long, long time. Barbados has way more people than this little rock can accommodate in space, resources and economy – so anytime in our history when there is a pull-back in the economy (as there is now), thousands of Bajans leave for better circumstances.

That happened when the Panama Canal was being carved from the jungle at the cost of 500 dead Bajans per mile, and it happened in the 1950’s and 1960’s when the lure of working in the UK took thousands of our best and brightest people away – most never to return.

Who leaves Barbados during these migrations?       Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Disaster, Economy, History, Immigration, Island Life, Trinidad and Tobago

Murder of former Barbados Immigration Chief Kenrick Hutson now six years cold

Barbados Murder Gun Revolver 3

Six years ago on December 28, 2007, retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, aged 74, was murdered at the front of his home on a Friday evening as his wife and daughter were inside.

The killer’s trail has long grown cold and the police question how a man who retired 14 years previously could have been an assassin’s target over something that happened while he was either on the police force or head of Immigration.

It doesn’t seem square though – a 74 year old long retired man doesn’t get shot down as he reads the newspaper on the verandah with family and neighbours right there.

The murder of a former Chief Immigration Officer raises all kinds of concerns and questions. Obviously a man of Hutson’s experience and service would have made some enemies in a post where he was in charge of Immigration processing, investigations, charges and deportations. But Hutson was retired, and presumably would have little input or influence into current immigration matters.

IF his murder is associated with his service as Chief Immigration Officer, it would seem that it was either revenge for some past action – or to prevent Hutson from testifying or revealing information about something he knew.

Somebody knows something. There was a reason for this murder.

After two years of intense investigation, the murder of retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, still remains a mystery to Police Investigators. Kenrick Hutson was a family man, a father of three children and husband of Coreen for over 44 years. He had a reputation of being a true gentleman among his peers and was well liked in his community and club circles.

Friends and relatives can think of no incident during his tenure as a Police Officer and Chief Immigration Officer that can be attributed as being a motive for his murder, 14 years into his retirement. However, on Friday December 28th 2007, at 6.50 pm Kenrick Hutson was murdered at his home located on Butlers Avenue, Spooners Hill, St. Michael.

Investigations indicate that the assailant walked from the direction of Codrington Hill, turned left into Butlers Avenue and proceeded to the Hutson residence. At the time of the incident, Mr. Hutson aged 74 was sitting on his verandah reading the daily newspapers, when the assailant entered the yard through the open front gate, climbed the steps leading to the verandah and shot Mr. Hutson several times about the body. The assailant then existed through the front gate and was seen running along Butlers Avenue towards Codrington Hill.

The assailant was identified as having a slim build, and dark complexion. He was wearing a whitish shirt, dark coloured pants and a cap with the peak facing front.

Crime Stoppers: March 17, 2010

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Immigration, Police

Journalist looks for help on Barbados Death Boat story

Barbados Death Boat.jpg

“I would like to send to my family in Bassada (a town in western Senegal) a sum of money. Please excuse me and goodbye. This is the end of my life in this big Moroccan sea,”

… victim Diao Souncar Dieme wrote his goodbyes.

In May of 2006 Bajan fisherfolk discovered a rusted steel-hulled yacht drifting to the east of Barbados. A grisly sight awaited them when they boarded, for the boat was a floating coffin carrying the mummified remains of 11 poor souls – all that was left of the 52 passengers who started the journey from Senegal to the Cape Verde Islands.

Bajans took the boat to shore, buried the bodies and held an inquest in 2009. Somewhere along the way European authorities arrested two people, but we never heard the result of the charges or anything more about the sad events.

Now, Spanish journalist Juan Manuel Pardellas is coming to Barbados on the last step of his mission to tell the story of the 52 people who perished on the death boat. Mr. Pardellas has already been to Senegal and met the families and he’d like to meet and talk with anyone in Barbados who can bring the final pieces of his story to completion…

Dear Barbados Free Press and readers,

 I will visit your island from 27th July to 6th August. I am a Spanish journalist and would like to meet with anyone who can help me to gather all possible information about the story of the 11 Senegalese boys found dead in the yacht in 2006. I have travelled to Senegal and met all the families. and Barbados is the last step in my work. Perhaps you can help me and let me meet some people of your beautiful island who worked hard to know the truth.

God bless you,

Juan Manuel Pardellas

Email: pardellasweb@gmail.com
Website: http://www.canarias3puntocero.com

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Filed under Barbados, Human Rights, Immigration