Daily Archives: May 4, 2015

Anna Druzhinina murder: Barbados killer appeals 21 year sentence May 5, 2015

Anna Druzhinina Murder

Terrath Persaud should have been hung. It’s what he did to Anna.

On May 5, the Court of Appeals of Barbados (in the new High Court building) will hear the appeal of Teerath Persaud for the length of his sentence for manslaughter of Anna Druzhinina.  It took family friend, Amy Beam two years (and a new Registrar of the Court) to obtain the transcripts from the trials of the two murderers (McCollin and Persaud) of Anna Druzhinina; a popular and loved 16-year-old Russian girl who lived in Barbados and was hanged in her home November 8, 2008.

Appeals are heard by 3 judges, including the Chief Justice.  Court opens at 9AM and is open to the public.  Beam wrote about the murder of her friend, Anna Druzhinina, in 2013, after the manslaughter trial of Teerath Persaud was completed and he was sentenced to 21 years of which he has now served six-and-a-half years.

Counting one year as actually only 9 months for “good behavior,” Persaud could be eligible for release in under 10 years.

BFP published the story written by Dr. Amy L. Beam in 3 parts in 2013:

Barbados murder of Russian teen Anna Druzhinina: Censorship and Travesty of Justice

The Barbados Nation News also published the story which is no longer online, but the cache is still available here: Death’s Load

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Police

LIAT: There’s only two basic choices…

LIAT late

by Iain Edghill

As I see it, there are only 2 choices facing LIAT and its government shareholders. Either it has to be deemed an “essential service” and continue to be subsidized despite the operational inefficiencies inherent in its structure; or, it has to be fully privatized, de-politicized, and forced to be self-sustaining.

Both options are problematic. In these tough economic times, when governments are cash-strapped and are trying to figure out how to stretch their dwindling resources, many constituencies will argue that subsidizing a national airline should be very low on the priority list. Conversely, there are those who will argue, not without just cause, that LIAT is crucial to inter-island communications and commerce.

Has any study ever been done as to exactly how much LIAT contributes to the GDP of CARICOM? That is crucial to the discussion here. What would the economic impact be, in $$ terms, if LIAT were to disappear? Once that figure is empirically established, that could be used as the baseline for government subsidies, a quid-pro-quo, so to speak.

Perhaps the solution is a form of public-private sector partnership, with CARICOM governments providing a baseline subsidy, and the private-sector, with aviation professionals providing the operational expertise in running the airline, as Mr. Lynch correctly suggests, being the other half of the operational and financial equation.

One thing is for sure with regard to LIAT: the status-quo is both financially and operationally unfeasible.

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Filed under Aviation, Barbados Tourism, Barbados Transportation, CARICOM