Daily Archives: May 9, 2014

Political, religious, race-based agendas and fears are destroying our historical records

Successive Barbados governments have been talking for at least twenty years about the need to protect our historical places, buildings and written history with laws and actions – and then offering that heritage as part of our tourism.

Yup, they have been talking about it for years. Talk. Talk. Talk. Talk – and not much else. Matter a fact, successive governments have chosen a fast buck or neglect every time over spending money to preserve and restore.

So this week was no different when Tourism Minister Richard Sealy said all the right words in front of first conference of Caribbean National Trusts and Preservation Societies. And words are about all that will be done until the next conference.

“Where’s the plan, Minister? Where’s the budget? Where’s the money put aside in your government’s budget for historical preservation?”

Words are all the DLP and BLP governments offer.

Here is an article we first published back in 2010, where our old friend Jim Lynch explains one of the reasons that we never seem to act to preserve our heritage, only talk. Maybe Mr. Sealy might read it…

Barbados Free Press

Our old friend and retired “Twotter” pilot Jim Lynch loves to preserve Barbados history and is a treasure-trove of information and advice for those seeking to learn about their Caribbean ancestry. He has published some very special books that will occupy you for weeks if you get one in your hands. Two years ago we covered his work in our article Old Barbados Newspapers Are A Treasure Of History.

Today Jim stopped by BFP and left the following comment that we think is worth a few minutes of your time.

Thanks, Jim! (I think the photo is about 25 years old, but you haven’t aged a bit, have you?) 🙂

I have been commended – and abused – in the past for saying what others think but refuse to put into words.

In Barbados, as in other Caribbean islands (and indeed in other parts of the world), records are destroyed…

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, History

Typical: 1/ Wall off the coast. 2/ Provide no parking for beach-goers. 3/ Advertise the beach to tourists.

Barbados Beach Problems (click photo for large)

Tear down these walls!

It’s a good thing there is no truth in advertising, for instead of showing the usual photos of bikini clad lovelies frolicking on the Bajan sand between blue sea and green foliage, we’d have to show a wall of concrete condos blocking the sun and the view – with nary a path for people to find their way to the beach.

Parking? You mek sport! Why would our esteemed leaders ever give a care to provide parking spots near the very beaches upon which this island’s economy depends?

Fools they are, and fools we are for letting them continue to sell every last piece of land with not a thought about what happens when large stretches of beach are inaccessible except to the few elites who can afford to live right there.

Unfinished concrete skeletons dot the coast. TEAR DOWN THESE WALLS and let the people access the beach!

Beach Bummer

IT IS fast becoming one of the most popular beaches in Barbados, especially among visitors, but there is a snag.

The beach, located along the busy highway at The Garden, St James, has no parking space. As a result, visitors park their vehicles along Storehouse Gap, just opposite the road leading to the beach, resulting in the two-lane road being restricted to one lane for traffic going in both directions…

Read it all in The Nation

(and thanks to The Nation for the photo)

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Economy, Environment, Real Estate

Trinidad Joint Select Committee of Parliament pulls a dirty trick – provides only 10 days notice for submissions

Afra Raymond

Trinidad anti-corruption activist Afra Raymond

Submitted by BFP reader Yummie Bear

Oh sure… the f**king Trini parliamentarians are pretending to have a major inquiry into the administration and operations of the Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago.

What can they do to limit the debate, disenfranchise citizens and make sure that informed persons are unable to present a proper submission to the committee? Easy… give only ten days notice to the deadline for submissions!

F**cking politicians. F**king corrupt b**tards!

Read Afra Raymond’s new column. He doesn’t call ’em like I do – he’s a lot more polite, but he’d probably like to use the words that I do.

ONE LOVE!

Yummie Bear

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Filed under Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Politics & Corruption, Trinidad and Tobago