More unemployment coming to Barbados hotel and tourism sector

“Government will eventually have to decide what it wants – Tax the industry out of existence or put in place the reforms discussed over decades that clearly have made a significant difference for a solitary player.

Or, apply the reforms uniformly to alleviate the current national imbalance.”

Hotel layoffs the natural result of Government failure to keep promises

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

It is now a full six months since companies trading under the Sandals Resorts brand were granted unilateral extraordinary concessions never before seen in the long history of our tourism industry. Despite repeated assurances given to the tourism sector, once again implementation is sadly lacking and as we enter the long eight summer months the industry is left floundering to second guess pricing and marketing strategies that will help it survive yet another year.

Criticism is leveled again at some hoteliers for not passively submitting to the prices dictated by tour operators, which ultimately has led to further airlift losses from a market that is especially attractive in terms of average duration of stay. But pray tell me, how can any Government official expect a single accommodation provider to agree fixed contract rates up to eighteen months ahead of arrival date when they have no overall idea on what those rates are based on?

It really has to reflect the height of lunacy when the remarks are uttered by someone who holds the ultimate power together with his cabinet colleagues to return the industry to viability. Until this is done the chance of competing with many other Caribbean destinations at the same level remains only a distant dream.

Surely by now our policymakers understand the basics of how the travel business is structured and the timing required to put programmes in place.

As pointed out many times before, Barbados is an incredibly tour operator dependent destination with many of the larger players being vertically integrated. Regardless of whether aircraft are leased or purchased, ultimately the cost of acquisition and operation has to be factored into the retail holiday offering. Long haul planes like the Airbus 330 have a list price of between US$216-239 million, so the thought of not devising proper utilisation, months if not years ahead cannot be an overly speculative or vague option. Therefore, as one of the major elements, if the operator cannot reduce the airline seat cost they have to look for savings in other ways to offer a competitive package.

Government will eventually have to decide what it wants – Tax the industry out of existence or put in place the reforms discussed over decades that clearly have made a significant difference for a solitary player. Or, apply the reforms uniformly to alleviate the current national imbalance.

More unemployment on the way

If there is more deliberation and delay by the administration with any yet to be evaluated fiscal benefits from a late Easter, hoteliers and other direct tourism services will go into a cost saving mode. This inevitably leads to further unemployment and all the consequences that brings. Compound this likely scenario with the thousands of job losses in the public service and it is difficult to believe that more business failures over the next few months are avoidable.

The release of arrival figures to the public seem to get later and later each month and up until this column was submitted, some markets were still to be correlated. However, all the indications are that March 2014 will be down over the same period last year, marking a decline in 22 of 23 consecutive months!

1 Comment

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Economy

One response to “More unemployment coming to Barbados hotel and tourism sector

  1. Party Animal

    The only two Industries that could have helped Barbados to survive is the Sugar and Hotel Industries, and both Parties have done their best to destroy both.
    I can see, we all have to look forward to sucking salt in the future.