Monthly Archives: February 2014

Shocker: Frozen Taiwan Mahi-Mahi sold as fresh Barbados dolphin!

UPDATED: Importer to Barbados is… (drum roll please)…

Yinnex Co.
Taiwan 3 shipments total Has verified third-party data
2 shipments match west indies
…Stowed In A Refrigerated Set At The Of 25 Also Morgans Fish House Inc. 7 Gibbons Industrial Park, Barbados West Indies

Attn: Mr. Jonathan Morgan (link here)

Barbados Fish Market Mahi Mahi

We used to have to explain Bajan Dolphin to visitors. “It isn’t flipper but a fish known elsewhere as mahi mahi”.

Now even Bajans may need some explanations. As this recent photo taken at the Bridgetown Fishing Complex shows, your “fresh Bajan Dolphin” may well be defrosted Taiwanese Mahi Mahi!

How can this be? The answer is that it is easier and cheaper to import fish from the other side of the world, rather than to pay local fisher folk fair value.

Wary Bajan Fish Eater

Barbados Taiwan Dolphin (click photo for large)

Thanks to an old friend!

And from another old friend, we received this:

Yinnex Co. 17TH FL, 129 FU HSING SOUTH ROAD, SECTION 1 TAIPEI,TAIWAN S/O:1111

Advertisements

24 Comments

Filed under Agriculture, Barbados, Consumer Issues

Daughters of the Niger Delta “The oil has spoiled everything for us…”

BFP has been invited to see this documentary on Saturday March 8th. We’ll let you know what we think. Here is a description from the film’s website:

Daughters of the Niger Delta
Documentary (55:30 min)

Daughters of the Niger Delta is an intimate film portrait of three everyday heroines who manage to make ends meet against all odds. As their personal stories unfold, we come to see that the widely ignored environmental pollution in their backyard is not the only human rights issue affecting their lives.

The Stories

The film radically differs from the usual media reports about oil outputs, conflict, and kidnapping. It gives a taste of everyday life in the Niger Delta through the eyes of three ordinary women: Hannah, Naomi & Rebecca. Their struggle to survive in the delta’s beautiful but pollution-marred wetlands confronts us with the human impact of corporate irresponsibility, gender injustice, and failing government service delivery.

The stories of Hannah, Naomi, and Rebecca are sobering as well as uplifting. They shed light on day-to-day injustices that we rarely hear about in the news. But they also highlight women’s strength and resilience. Despite the hardship affecting their lives, the filmed women are determined to give their children a better future. Women may be the best captains to navigate the Niger Delta out of its troubled waters – if only they were given the chance.

Women’s Voices

It’s time to listen to women’s voices. Their priorities are relevant not only for the Niger Delta, but also for other parts of Nigeria that currently are marred by violence and social unrest. Women’s experiences can enrich the policy discourse – if only we are willing to listen.

Film website: Daughters of the Niger Delta

Comments Off on Daughters of the Niger Delta “The oil has spoiled everything for us…”

Filed under Africa, Disaster, Environment, Human Rights

Discredited Barbados Police can’t shake the tourist rape case that won’t go away.

Barbados rape dna police

Tourist Rape Victims continue to press for justice – for them and  for the wrongly accused!

Rape victims Dr. Rachel Turner (left) and Diane Davies (right) continue their quest to have the Royal Barbados Police Force re-open their rape cases. The two women were violently attacked in October 2010 while visiting Barbados, and then spent the next two years trying to free the man who was falsely arrested for the crime. Derrick Crawford spent two years in jail before the charges were dropped, despite the protests by the victims that he was not the man. True to form, our professional police force never took DNA samples from the victims, and the innocent man, Derrick Crawford, says most credibly that the police beat his confession out of him. You know, just like usual as people on this rock know.

The Commissioner of Police at the time was Darwin Dottin. BFP had been calling for Dottin’s sacking for years but it was not until June of 2013 that Bajans were finally rid of the man who led the Royal Barbados Police Force into a steep decline in professionalism and public support. Last June, the victims cheered Dottin’s removal…

Mrs Davies told the BBC she was “absolutely delighted” that Commissioner Dottin was no longer in charge.

“He supported the police investigation and turned on us,” said Mrs Davies.

She called on whoever replaces Commissioner Dottin to “reopen the case and find the man who attacked us”.

… from the BBC’s Barbados Rapes: Police Chief Removed

Now the victims are back in the news, having written to Prime Minister Freundel Stuart after Acting Commissioner Tyrone Griffith also refused to re-open the case.

How long will it take on politicians and police to learn that these days, you can’t make difficult or embarrassing happenings go away by ignoring them!

The internet is here. This story won’t go away on it’s own. It will keep coming back because the real rapist remains free and the victims want justice.

TopGear is coming. Watcha gonna do, Commissioner?   Continue reading

11 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Crime & Law, Human Rights, Police

Sandals 9 month closure another blow to Barbados economy and employment

Adrian Loveridge, tourism expert

Adrian Loveridge, tourism expert

So entirely contrary to all the heady rhetoric that the introduction of Sandals brand will drive additional airlift: in fact the exact opposite will happen from their closure on 1st April for major renovations.

At least until the re-opening slated for December 2014.

Quoting their own projected occupancy of an average of 85 per cent with a typical stay of 7 nights and two persons per room, that’s almost 500 lost airline seats per week or a mind boggling 16,000 plus by the end of this year.

Will this further destabilise the remaining carriers that continue to service Barbados and lead to yet more airlines cutting routes or reducing capacity? Tour operators, already unable to match demand with the high cost of doing business here, are considering switching flights to other destinations where they can glean a profit.

Once again citizens are left speculating whether our Government was aware and factored in the almost nine months closure with hundreds of hospitality employees being thrown on the unemployment pile, before granting unilateral extraordinary concessions to the Sandals group.

Perhaps they calculated the NIS and income tax contributions collected from local construction workers hired for refurbishment would more than make up for this. Because clearly, the state is not going to collect other taxes like VAT and import duties from Sandals as they have all been waived.  Most materials used will also be imported, so a substantial percentage of the estimated US$65 million project will simply re-export foreign exchange (FX).

Several other issues also have to be considered: The lost revenue to our Direct Tourism Services with included package components like golf green fees, catamaran, diving etc., let alone secondary spending that 16,000 plus extra visitors would have generated on submarine excursions, taxis, car rental attractions, activities and shopping. The list goes on and on. Continue reading

19 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Disaster, Economy

Adrian Loveridge looks at government spin on the disaster of Barbados Tourism

Sandals isn’t paying VAT to Barbados

Government has a 10 point Tourism plan? Really?

In four years the Government of Barbados hasn’t paid VAT refunds to Loveridge’s Peach and Quiet Hotel.

“Water is up by 62%. Electricity up by 70%…

What government in their right mind increases land taxes by 50% in a recession? Tell me!”

On the incredible tax and other concessions given to Sandals…

“Put it in simple terms. For my hotel to buy a 750ml bottle of Johnnie Walker Scotch would cost me sixty US dollars. Sandals are able to pay ten dollars.”

“Unilateral concessions to Sandals immediately destabilized the other 120 hotels on the islands, not to mention the condos, villas, apartments and guest houses. Completely destabilized the industry.”

36 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Disaster, Economy

Gardasil HPV vaccine controversy continues

“Orchestrated Campaign of Intimidation” or a lively debate?

Katie Couric gets hammered for daring to challenge big business.

Mercola.com: Gardasil and the Public Flogging of Katie Couric

BFP’s thanks to Larry

9 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Health

Letter to Trinidad & Tobago’s Registrar General – about fraudulent mortgages and fictitious deeds

Trinidad mortgage fraud

How did the Republic Bank let a mortgage under these circumstances?

Editor’s note: We received a copy of this email from an unverified person. Take everything with some salt, folks – but let’s have a look…

Dear Registrar,

I am writing to you in hopes that you can launch an investigation regarding the fraudulent mortgages and deeds that are registered in your data base.

The first is a deed of ascent, executed on 26Apr2006, by Carolyn Joefield with a deed # de200601162018.  It was verified on 05Aug 2010.

The second is a deed of conveyance executed on 24Jul2007, by Dexter James with a deed # de200703243051.  It was verified on 11Jan2008.

The last one is deed of conveyance executed 30Jan2009, by Evered Edwards with a deed # de200900680520.  Unfortunately, I do not have the date that this was verified for you.

“It is my belief that the following institutions willingly and knowingly used fictitious property descriptions and deeds of ascent and conveyance to acquire loans and steal property, my property included.”

It seems the 3 deeds mentioned above form part of an invisible estate that does not exist in reality, only on paper.  My question to the Registrar is, how did a Nyron Josefield, not Joefield, acquire a mortgage with Republic Bank using deed # 200601152018 on 19Oct2006?  The records clearly show that the deed that was used was only verified on 05Aug2010.  Continue reading

5 Comments

Filed under Crime & Law, Offshore Investments, Real Estate, Trinidad and Tobago