Daily Archives: January 20, 2014

We need to embrace airline loyalty programmes to fill almost a million empty hotel rooms

American-Airlines-Dallas-Barbados

“One of the reasons why I am so passionate about airline loyalty programmes is because existing marketing initiatives in the USA simply have not worked.”

Barbados is losing ground in our second largest tourist market

Adrian Loveridge, tourism expert

Adrian Loveridge, tourism expert

The merger of American Airlines and US Airways has now pushed the combined frequent flyer membership above the 100 million mark.

Put another way, that’s almost 33 per cent of the world’s third most populous country, the United States.

In any market it would be difficult to persistently ignore a huge segment of our second largest source of long stay visitors, but that is what Barbados has done. It defies belief, especially during times of economic challenges when holiday budgets can be among the first to suffer. It may also partially explain why some of our Caribbean neighbours have overtaken us in American long-stay visitors.

Sadly, the loss of the American Airlines direct service out of New York will further restrict the potential, previously having lost Dallas/Fort Worth and San Juan, plus Philadelphia with US Airways.

But with the miles now totally interchangeable between the two carriers, we still have daily service from Miami and currently once a week from Charlotte. Whether the re-organisation will result in a downsizing of the North Carolina hub and curtailment of this flight remains to be seen.

Route changes have yet to be announced, so ‘we’ are not fully aware of any new opportunities that it may present, but that should not stop us from exploiting what already exists.

One of the reasons why I am so passionate about airline loyalty programmes is because existing marketing initiatives in the USA simply have not worked. There has been no overall long stay visitor arrival increase from this market for six years, so surely it’s long overdue that alternative strategies are at least tried.  Continue reading

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10 Comments

Filed under Aviation, Barbados, Barbados Tourism

Barbados Labour Party organising protests against government

A train called CIVIL UNREST

A train called CIVIL UNREST

“Dear Barbados Free Press,

You should have been at the BLP meeting at St. George Secondary School. The Nation is soft selling the talk about marching in the streets. More nuff than talk is happening when former cabinet ministers telling people to organise marches.”

Received from an anonymous reader

‘Unrest’ word spoken again

Crime is already rising in proportion to the closed businesses and potholed roads. The Royal Barbados Police Force and the Defense forces recently increased crowd control training and joint practices.

The government hears it coming. Law enforcement and defense hear it coming. Private security patrol companies hear it coming.

Now you listen… Hear that train in the distance? It’s not so faint anymore, you can really hear it now. It’s coming…

Marching ‘may be only way’

Some prominent members of the Barbados Labour Party have come out in support of civil protest against the Government, despite recommendations to the contrary from the trade union movement.

During one of the party’s The People’s Assembly meetings at St George Secondary School last night, various speakers said taking to the streets in protest might be the only way for Barbadians to get their message across to the Freundel Stuart administration.

One such speaker was former Cabinet minister Anthony Wood, who said the imposition of university fees and the planned layoff of thousands of public servants were reason enough.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Politics

Drugs, the Drug Trade and Us

HMCS Ottawa Barbados Drugs

Special to BFP by Phillip Alexander

Following on the almost billion dollar drug bust found a few years ago in the hull of a yacht bound for Spain outfitted in T&T, the six hundred million dollars worth of cocaine intercepted at Monos down the islands for which a handful of small fries are spending life in prison, and the soft drink that killed a foreign national ‘accidentally’ in the branded bottle of a Company now in the international spotlight once again as another of its brands are found to contain seven hundred and thirty pounds of narcotics, I turn my attention to the drug trade in Trinidad & Tobago.

At a local car dealership in San Juan a shipping container was opened and millions of dollars worth of drugs literally fell out onto the floor. A container full of chicken was opened on the port and found to contain again millions of dollars worth of drugs for which no one has been arrested, and, on the heels of both of those discoveries I ask, why has it not become mandatory that all shipping containers be unstuffed on the port?

A surgeon in east Trinidad has removed drugs from the stomach of a drug mule without reporting the matter to the police, and from what can be gleaned from the sanitized media stories, both surgeon and mule are still free to continue plying their trade. What is to become of this?  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Police, Politics, Trinidad and Tobago