Monthly Archives: January 2014

Peter Binose: Harlequin shows ignorance of Flood Plain disasters – or they are not being forthright

Ricky Small cries for his dear wife Joselle, who was taken by the raging waters at Buccament Bay Resort.

Ricky Small cries for his dear wife Joselle, who was taken by the raging waters at Buccament Bay Resort.

How often does a ‘Hundred Year Event’ happen?

by Peter Binose

According to Harlequin’s Solicitors, it only happens once in a hundred years.

They said that the World Bank are sending a report in which Christmas floods will be described as a hundred year flood.

Obviously Harlequin do not know what a ‘100 year flood’ actually means.

We need to be aware of a 1 in 100 year event does not mean the probabilities will only happen once in every hundred years. It actually means that it is an event that will happen once in every 100 big cloud bursts or storms. If you had a hundred of those in a day, there are probabilities that such flooding will occur. If it happens in a week, then once a week, if it happens in a year once a year etc. In fact what it means there is a 1% probability of it happening. See here.

There is approximately a 63.4% chance of one or more 100-year floods occurring in any 100-year period.

That means folks, 63 floods in a hundred years, more than one every two years.

“That Buccament Bay Resort is built in a flood plain is a physical fact. There can be no debate.”

Flood years for Buccament   Continue reading

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949 Comments

Filed under Consumer Issues, Disaster

Bloggers can make a difference – Sandals now serving Bajan rum… but value delivery eludes our tourism industry

“Value-for-money is probably the most discussed subject amongst our cherished guests. Many simply cannot understand why a piece of locally available fish cannot be cooked, garnished and served in moderate surroundings for around BDS$25-30.”

Killing the messenger – or listening!

Adrian Loveridge, tourism expert

Adrian Loveridge, tourism expert

The blogs can of course be a double edged sword. The anonymity allows, if the contributor wishes, comments to be made without risk of targeted personal attacks and political labeling, while still being able to express an opinion whether constructive or not.

Sadly, if you chose not to hide behind the veil of ‘anonymous’ it holds the risk of the messenger being castigated, rather than evaluating any merit in the message itself.

For those of us who hold democracy dear and have personally experienced alternative regimes, it goes with the territory and if it helps maintain responsible freedom of speech then personally I have no problem.

A recent blogger, writing under the name of ‘Fisheye’ put forward 16 points to improve our tourism offerings.

Online Immigration Forms… Why not?

To me, one suggestion especially stood out and that was to allow our visitors to complete the required immigration form online.

Bearing in mind the rapid trend in online transactions, whether for banking, bill payment, shopping, airline or hotel check-in, car rental registration or whatever, it seems a very simple but effective way to capture important marketing information.

It may also speed up the collection of this information to allow the Barbados Statistical Service (BSS) to make it publicly available in a timelier manner. It can often take the BSS ages to post arrival information on their website and even then, months like August 2013 are not available at all.

Compounding the difficulty in accessing up-to-date information is the fact that the Ministry of Tourism does not currently have a functioning website.

Other ‘Fisheye’ suggestions included the issuing of local driver’s licenses at the Barbados Tourism Authority’s (BTA) airport office and ensuring widespread availability of lower priced SIM cards to save our visitors from expensive roaming charges. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism

Survey says Barbados top spot for eloping Brits!

Barbados wedding elope

Okay… how do we turn this information into more visitors?

Barbados is the preferred spot for eloping (24 per cent)”

Our thanks for the photo to Sue Morris and SoulMates Barbados wedding services

4 Comments

Filed under Barbados

Bajan Roots: Looking for historical information about the Byram family in Barbados

history-of-barbados-hilary-beckles.jpg

Dear Barbados Free Press,

I would like to learn about the history or origin of the Surname BYRAM in Barbados.

My ancestor, Nicholas Byram was born in Kent, England about 1610. He was in Barbados sometime during the period 1620 – 1635.

I have found in Facebook two persons with the surname Byram who have family roots in Barbados but one, a lifeguard named Selena Byram, worked at a beach in Barbados and was killed by a shark. The other person’s grandparents lived in Barbados but had no knowledge of the history of their Byram surname.

Jerry Byram

2 Comments

Filed under Barbados, History, Slavery

Nation News ‘Dear Christine’ advises woman to commit paternity fraud

paternity fraud barbados

“it will not be in your best interest, >>> for you to bring this matter to the fore at this stage.”

A married woman is preggers and doesn’t know if her husband or some bloke at the office is the father. “Dear Christine” in The Nation advises the woman to keep her yob shut because it is not in her best interest to tell her husband.

It’s called PATERNITY FRAUD and women do it to men all the time. Once the man starts paying for the child it is usually too late to reverse the responsibility even if the man was tricked into believing it was his child.

Paternity Fraud has been called ‘The Perfect Crime

Do you love your wife? Good. Is she having a baby? Good.

At the first opportunity make sure you quietly take a DNA swab when no one is looking and send it away for testing to see if the child is really yours. Better to know right away for a whole lot of reasons.

Just do it.

Further Reading

Wikipedia: Paternity Fraud

Daily Mail: Another paternity fraud victim reveals how he was deceived.

PaternityFraud.com

31 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights

Gunmen ambush patrolling Barbados police – one officer slightly shot

Barbados Murder Gun Revolver 3

“One officer slightly shot” sounds a bit strange, but it’s just about what the police and papers are saying happened on Tuesday night. The story only deserves four sentences in the Nation and Barbados Today because that is all the information released by the police.

Think about that folks: Gunmen saw patrolling police officers, then started shooting in an ambush. If that doesn’t sound like Kingston, Jamaica I don’t know what does.

But the police and the news media are playing down the incident, I suppose because the injured officer was only ‘slightly’ shot.

Strange times ’bout this place. Sometimes I swear somebody stole my country and put this new one under my feet. It looks like the same old place, but it isn’t.

A police detective was “slightly injured” when gunmen opened fire on a group of officers last night.

Police public relations officer Inspector David Welch says members of the Criminal Investigations Department were on patrol in Chapman Lane, the City around 11 pm when unknown assailants shot at them several times before running away.

He said police returned fire.

The incident is being investigated.

… from Barbados Today Men Shoot at Police

25 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Police

Peter Binose: Politicians, political bullies and other cowards

Racist_Ralph_Gonsalves

Rubbish Caribbean Politicians and Marxist Pretenders!

by Peter Binose

Politicians who are haters, political bullies and distributors of malice and spite are always cowards.

They like to pick on small sections of society, little groups and little people. They know that little and disorganised people can be no threat to them so they are able to administer hatred, spite and malice without it affecting very much their support during the election process.

And in any case they can always re-buy them with a few trinkets at a later date, even on the very morning of an election.

Now I actually believe that the current leadership and the people who they insult and treat with absolute scorn and disdain fall into those very categories. What we can be sure of is that all our silences in the face of assault are acts of complicity. Its the very kind of acceptance that brought about the slavery of our forefathers.

Politicians who think with their epidermis or their genitalia, or their ruling class ancestry or clan and family, entitle them to be our masters – are the problem we should not tolerate.

One does not banish this spectre of bad behaviour by invoking it ourselves. If we would not vote against someone on the grounds of ‘race’ or ‘gender’ alone, then by the exact same token we would not cast a vote in their favour for the identical reason.

Yet see how this obvious question makes fairly intelligent Vincentian people say the most alarmingly stupid things and act in the most ignorant ways. If we are willing to accept scum behaviour from scum politicians perhaps we deserve to be ground under the boot of these political bullies. Continue reading

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Filed under Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Politics & Corruption