How Chinese activist artist Ai Weiwei exposed shoddy Chinese construction that killed thousands of students

File under ‘Give more Bajan construction jobs to Chinese companies’

Ai Weiwei

Named by ArtReview as the most powerful artist in the world, Ai Weiwei is China’s most celebrated contemporary artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic. In April 2011, when Ai disappeared into police custody for three months, he quickly became China’s most famous missing person. First-time director Alison Klayman gained unprecedented access to the charismatic artist, as well as his family and others close to him, while working as a journalist in Beijing. In the years she filmed, government authorities shut down Ai’s blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention–while Time magazine named him a runner-up for 2011’s Person of the Year. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Sundance 2012, her compelling documentary portrait is the inside story of a passionate dissident for the digital age who inspires global audiences and blurs the boundaries of art and politics.

Thanks to an old friend for pointing us to this video

2 Comments

Filed under Building Collapse, China, Consumer Issues, Human Rights

2 responses to “How Chinese activist artist Ai Weiwei exposed shoddy Chinese construction that killed thousands of students

  1. robert ross

    The story confirms what we want to believe – that there is value in blogging. The results may be uncertain, misty, elusive; yet if the ‘message’ is sufficiently coherent and honourable in intention, and in that sense ‘true’, then what a wonderful vehicle for change it can be.

  2. robert ross

    @ BFP

    Don’t you agree…if you get my drift? Silence is not always ‘golden’.