Attention UWI Cave Hill philosophy majors: Your country needs you!

 

Now this is funny, but probably not to half the folks at Cave Hill.

Not because they won’t get the joke, but because they will…

The only thing that can stop this asteroid is your Liberal Arts Degree

By now you’re probably wondering what this is all about, why FBI agents pulled you out of your barista job, threw you on a helicopter, and brought you to NASA headquarters. There’s no time, so I’ll shoot it to you straight. You’ve seen the news reports. What hit New York wasn’t some debris from an old satellite. There’s an asteroid the size of Montana heading toward Earth and if it hits us, the planet is over. But we’ve got one last-ditch plan. We need a team to land on the surface of the asteroid, drill a nuclear warhead one mile into its core, and get out before it explodes. And you’re just the liberal arts major we need to lead that team…

… continue reading The only thing that can stop this asteroid is your Liberal Arts Degree by Mike Lacher

 

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15 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Education

15 responses to “Attention UWI Cave Hill philosophy majors: Your country needs you!

  1. robert ross

    In a conversation with a UWI Philosophy major not too long ago, I asked her about Wittgenstein. She knew the name but could tell me nothing more. So yes, maybe find something else for them.

  2. Kevin Layne

    I love it how the scientist types love to think that what they do is ever so important and anyone who does not follow their vocation is somehow irrelevant. Reminds me of Sheldon on “The Big Bang Theory”.

  3. Mark Fenty

    @”Robert Ross”
    Robert with all due respect sir; what is so special about Wittgenstein within the context of philosophy? I took “Introduction to Philosophy”,
    and “Philosophy of Ethics,” many years ago, and I still haven’t the slightest idea who is Wittgenstein. Perhaps, I’m simple minded, and missing something here; can you enlightening me as to who is Wittgenstein within the framework of philosophy sir? Finally question Robert, why should is really matters, whether or not she knows Wittgenstein? I just don’t get it.

  4. Mark Fenty

    @”Robert Ross”
    Robert with all due respect sir; what is so special about Wittgenstein within the context of philosophy? I took “Introduction to Philosophy”,
    and “Philosophy of Ethics,” many years ago and I still haven’t the slightest idea who is Wittgenstein. Perhaps, I’m simple minded, and missing something here; can you enlightening me as to who is Wittgenstein within the framework of philosophy sir? Finally question Robert, why should it really matter, whether or not she knows Wittgenstein? I just don’t get it.

  5. Expert Plumber

    @ Robert Ross: How can any true student of philosophy not know the full story of Wittgenstein?

    Bertrand Russell described him as “the most perfect example I have ever known of genius as traditionally conceived, passionate, profound, intense, and dominating”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_Wittgenstein

    I understand the author of this article.

    Philosophy has its place, but we must eat and the toilets must flush!

  6. Mark Fenty

    When one talk about philosophy it is important that one distinguishes which period one is referring to. In Ancient Philosophy one hears about the Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. In Contemporary Philosophy one hears about the Empiricists, like Locke, Hume, and Berkeley, or the Rationalists like Kant, Hegel, Descartes, and Karl Jasper etc.

  7. robert ross

    @ Mark Fenty

    Having nothing to do, I came back to this and saw your blogs. You simply can’t divide up philosophical periods in the way you suggest though I can see that for an elementary course you might have to do that….that is to say the ‘guided tour’ approach – which you also get in Jurisprudence courses. The argument nominalism/realism goes back to Plato and Aristotle but is all still being debated in one form or another. I don’t think you’d call the people you mention exponents of ‘contemporary’ philosophy. For that I guess you’d start with Russell and then Ayer, Ryle, Waismann, Wisdom and, of course, Wittgenstein. IF you want to follow up Wittgenstein, there’s a nice book by a fellow called Ray Monk simply called ‘Ludwig Wittgenstein’. Wittgenstein’s best known books are the ‘Tractatus Logico Philosophicus’ and the ‘Philosophical Investigations’. The basic idea is that words (and so also concepts) are neither one-to-one (with one meaning atomically) nor a free for all – but that everything depends on the language game you’re playing.

  8. robert ross

    @ Expert Plumber

    And that came from someone, his pupil, who debunked him!

  9. Mark Fenty

    Robert, many have argued that Jane Rousseau has defined the contemporary period of philosophy, but that’s open for debate won’t you say? Remember now, there are Ancient, Mediaeval, and contemporary philosophers, and I would hardly consider Hume, Berkeley, and Locke mediaeval philosophers.

  10. Mark Fenty

    @Robert Ross
    Robert, I appreciate your effort in directing me to Wittgenstein’s book; I’m always willing to learn something new. But to be quite frank, I’ve ask some of my friends in the pedagogic arena on this side of the world, about
    Wittgenstein’s contribution to philosophy. And they informed me in no uncertain terms, that Wittgenstein hasn’t really impacted philosophy the way some on your side of the world thinks he has done. For example, Socrates is know in the western world as the father of philosophy, and Rene Descartes is known as the contemporary face of philosophy, because he has brought a new orthodoxy, or a paradigm shift to philosophy.In the hall of academia on this side of the world no one talks about Wittgenstein, as a matter of fact, a great many people haven’t even heard of him on the other side of these waters. Trust me Robert, I consider myself an insatiable reader. And as much reading I have done thus far, I’ve never one came across Wittgenstein’s name in any of the books that I have read, nor saw any references made about him, or his writing to be quite frank.

  11. Mark Fenty

    Wittgenstein may have been a genius in his own right, but in America, not much it taught about in the world of academics. Your guess is good as mind as to why they didn’t value his philosophy in this part of the world.

  12. Mark Fenty

    Wittgenstein may have been a genius in his own right, but in America, not much is taught about in the world of academic. Your guess is good as mind as to why they didn’t value his philosophy in this part of the world.

  13. Mark Fenty

    Robert in addition to the philosophy few courses that I have had the opportunity to have taken many years ago. I also read many books by
    some of the more prominent philosophers who have impacted philosophy in profound ways. And even though I have an immeasurable respect for the work Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, who are thought of as the foundation of western philosophy; I nonetheless can relate intellectually to Rousseau’s philosophy because it strikes a deeper core in the human conscience in my opinion.
    Now, Let me say this much Robert, I hardly consider “Philosophy of Ethics” an elementary course as you suggested. Because as you well know, philosophy is divided into five branches of studies: Metaphysics, Epistemology, Ethics, Aesthetics, and logic. And it is an understatement or rather disingenuous in my estimation, to suggest unequivocally that Philosophy of Ethics is somehow mediocre in the wide ocean of philosophy.
    I quite agree with you nonetheless,that philosophy is susceptible to an infinite number of interpretations. I’m also confident that those who have had the opportunity to accustom themselves to this discipline; would nonetheless agree with your perspective. But, I also know that you would agree with me when I say that, if we vivisect “time” according to its prescribed periods, Ancient, Medieval, and modern, that we can also ascribe it to the philosophers within these three prescribed periods.

  14. Mark Fenty

    Robert in addition to the few philosophy courses that I have had the opportunity, to have taken many years ago. I also read many books by some of the more prominent philosophers who have impacted philosophy in
    profound ways. And even though I have an immeasurable respect for the work Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, who are thought of as the foundation of western philosophy; I nonetheless can relate intellectually to Rousseau’s philosophy because strikes a deeper core in the human conscience in my opinion.
    Now, Let me say this much Robert, I hardly consider “Philosophy of Ethics” an elementary course as you have suggested. Because as you well know, philosophy is divided into five branches of studies: Metaphysics, Epistemology, Ethics, Aesthetics, and logic. And it is an understatement or rather disingenuous in my estimation, to suggest unequivocally that Philosophy of Ethics is somehow mediocre in the wide ocean of philosophy.
    I quite agree with you that philosophy is susceptible to an infinite number of interpretations. I’m also confident that those who have had the opportunity to accustom themselves to this discipline; would nonetheless agree with your perspective. But, I also know that you would agree with me when I say that, if we vivisect “time” according to its prescribed periods, Ancient, Medieval, and modern, that we can also ascribe it to the philosophers within these three prescribed periods.

  15. Mark Fenty

    Robert I beg your pardon sir, I’ve made a sight grammatical error in the first paragraph, but I nonetheless hope you understand what I’m endeavoring to convey here. I guess, I could only attribute these recent grammatical errors
    to a declining cognition.