Monthly Archives: May 2011

Fraud Cover-up alleged at Barbados Public Workers Cooperative Credit Union

To Members of the Press:

The Annual General Meeting of Barbados Public Workers Cooperative Credit Union will be held on June 18th 2011 and will be a watershed as a large number of fed up and concerned members will be there to let their voices be heard.

The major issues are:

  • Two cases of fraud which are being covered up by the Management, Board and Supervisory Committee. These fraud cases were not reported to the external auditors or to the regulator as required by section 215 of the Cooperatives Societies Act. Indeed the CEO and Management did not follow the procedures set out in their own anti-fraud policy — which should have seen the Internal Auditor immediately alerted and the necessary investigations conducted. Two staff members have lost their jobs so far and dozens of members whose cards were created by one particular individual are at risk. While these two staff members are no longer with the organisation, there is evidence that they did not act alone. The members are therefore concerned about any involvement by others including supervisory and management staff. Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Business & Banking, Consumer Issues, Corruption, Crime & Law

Customers waiting six weeks for Multi-Choice TV installations: No antennas available

UPDATED: June 7, 2011

“The Government keeps on and on about purchasing locally.  Surely, Barbados has the technical know how to make antennas.”

Further to my letter last week, I have today ‘phoned MCTV to check on progress, after 5 weeks!

I was informed that the Miami shippers had notified the 16th June, for delivery in Barbados  ? or, leaving Miami ? I wasn’t informed.

Once again I had to do the chasing.

I believe MCTV are a Government controlled body. Why is it they cannot purchase locally ?  The Government keeps on and on about purchasing locally.  Surely, Barbados has the technical know how to make antennas.

Original story published May 31, 2011…

submitted by reader “S”

I am not sure if anyone knows but I have been informed by MCTV, when I paid for my proposed TV package, on the 3rd May, that I would have to wait 4 – 6 weeks, because the Company didn’t have any aerials.  Phoning today, chasing progress, nothing received on Island.

Why is it that I have to do the chasing, is it beyond MCTV’s responsibility that they couldn’t ‘phone me to advise on progress – they have my money?

Can no one on this Island produce the aerials?  Shouldn’t a Company look into the Island and not abroad?


Filed under Barbados, Consumer Issues

Barbados Bar Association President: Police beat confessions from suspects

Will Commissioner Dottin dare to say it isn’t so?

The allegation by Bar Association President Andrew Pilgrim that some Barbados police officers beat confessions from suspects is no surprise in that folks know how things are done ’bout hey when it comes to confessions. What is surprising is that Mr. Pilgrim has thrown down the gauntlet publicly and announced what everyone knows.

The judges must know what is going on – that suspects in detention always seem to “confess” when certain police officers are doing the “interviewing”. It is a wonder that the Barbados judges haven’t almost refused to convict upon confessions, or at least disregarded confessions when considering their verdict. Maybe the judges rationalize that the accused is a career criminal or that the police lack the resources and skills to do a proper investigation.

Mr. Pilgrim is an outspoken lawyer who knows what he is up against, but it is refreshing to see someone with a high profile position refuse to keep silent when is comes to our third-rate police force. The Royal Barbados Police Force doesn’t have to be third-rate, but it will remain so until the politicians decide that policing and citizen safety are priorities, and back it up with the funding to hire, train and retain the quality of police officers that Barbados deserves. Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Ethics, Human Rights

Public Procurement: Can we ever clean up the corruption?

This article forms part of the Private Sector/Civil Society publication ‘Public Procurement Special’ in the Trinidad & Tobago Review and is published here with the permission of one of the authors. The lessons for Barbados are there if we care to look.

Consider some of the quotes from the article…

“The largest State projects were being executed outside of any normal system of accountability.”

“Some of the features of these fiascos are –

  • Huge cost over-runs on virtually every project.
  • Unfinished projects which virtually no one can make sense of…
  • A gross burden on our Treasury going forward – The continuing delay in completing the accounts for these State Enterprises shows how difficult it is to work out exactly what the State owes and to whom.”

The authors are talking about Trinidad and Tobago but it sure sounds like Bridgetown to me. Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Ethics, Political Corruption, Trinidad and Tobago

Barbados Advocate Editorial: Islam, Rastafarianism are “extremist religions”

Bob Marley: Extremist - just like Muslim suicide bombers!

Also: Intolerant, arguing Christians are just like mass-murdering Al Qaeda

Dear BFP and fellow readers,

Have you read the Barbados Advocate ‘editorial’ called “Tolerance the path to peace” ???

What pap. What rubbish. Aside from the pure idiocy of some of the stated “facts” and conclusions, I’d just like to know what the author was smoking and where they got it – because it must be excellent herb!

submitted by “Big Cutter”

Further Reading

BFP will reprint the entire Barbados Advocate editorial here because you know how that paper changes history – but you should still go to the paper’s website to read the full article because it’s only fair. (link above) Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Religion

Patrick R. Hoyos: Poor Barbados justice system frightens away foreign investors

“Where is the justice?”

Editor’s comment: This article by Patrick Hoyos brilliantly explains what is probably one of the most destructive forces in our society and economy – the inability of our justice system (for a variety of reasons) to deliver justice. Bajans have long known that our highly politicized and under-funded justice system cannot be relied upon, and that “Rule of Law” in Barbados means that those in positions of power can change or ignore the rules and the law without accountability.

The big problem for the elites is that with the advent of the internet, Barbados lost the power to control information. Thus, foreign investors and people who might be thinking about doing business in Barbados now know that business disputes typically take decades to resolve before the Barbados courts. Smart money runs from doing business in such a jurisdiction.

Increasingly international investors and companies are happy to have their money flow through Barbados to other jurisdictions – but invest or do business here? Leave the money here? Now that’s something else.

We’ve reprinted Patrick’s article here in full, lest someone pressure him to remove it from his own website, but we ask you to read the full article at The Broad Street Journal. If you live, do business or invest in Barbados, you’ll soon find yourself visiting The Broad Street Journal on a daily basis and eagerly anticipating the next article.

A bridge too far

By Patrick R. Hoyos    Published May 24, 2011

It is now three months since I wrote in this space about The Tribunal That Won’t Deliver its Judgment.

Three months since I noted that, despite having to wait three years after winning their case in court to have hearings before the Severance Payments Tribunal to determine the “quantum of severance,” and nearly a year since those hearings had ended, no judgement had yet been delivered.

Three months since I pointed out the frustration felt by all of the plaintiffs that justice for them seemed only to exist on paper but could not find its way into coin of the realm.

Three months since I pointed out that one of the plaintiffs had died without receiving his settlement.

I asked then, “Where is the justice?” Continue reading


Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Offshore Investments

Barbados Light and Power delivering RUBBISH electricity

Do we have any power quality standards at all?

Has anyone noticed the electrical RUBBISH coming out of the AC outlet in the wall… or is it just me?

My APS battery backup on the floor is constantly going tick-tock as it compensates for fluctuations in local electricity supply.

Several times a day the supply is so bad/under-current/’noisy’ the computer shuts down!

I looked into the software that communicates with the APS unit on the floor to discover the recorded history:

OVER-Voltage-  NEVER!
Under-Voltage: 35 times.
Electrical ‘noise’ – 193 times.

What a marvelous supply history you have, Barbados Light & Power!

by “P”,

photo of harmful current courtesy of Enetics, used for illustrative purposes only. Not a BL&P chart.



Filed under Barbados, Consumer Issues, Energy