Why Democracy in Egypt will be a disaster for women and human rights in general

Egyptian people demand democracy – and female genital mutilation

It is a mistake to think that changing any country’s system of government to “democracy” automatically results in gains in human rights and freedoms. Democracy only reflects the values and the will of the majority. In the case of Egypt, democracy will reflect Islamic values: not the values that we in Western societies often wrongly attribute to democracy.

Bajan (and Western) democracy is a reflection of our values, laws and history. Egypt’s democracy will be something else: and that “something else” is what the civilized world should greatly fear.

In Barbados, our democracy – the will of the people – reflects our country’s Western/Christian values and historical traditions. Oh, we can argue over all kinds of issues and change our laws as our society and current values develop, but our legislators are generally held in check by our Constitution and a set of laws, traditions and values that go way back to the Magna Carta. And whether you like it or not, all of that historically rests upon a tradition of Judeo/Christian religious values.

Egyptian people demand democracy – and stoning for adultery

As we saw a few months ago when a young Bajan from the Barbados Al-Falah Muslim School argued for Islamic Sharia laws, beheading, chopping off of hands, and compulsory veils for women – Islamic values as found in the Koran are quite different from current Bajan and Western values. (One of the Al-Falah Muslim School students in the above photo argued for beheading.)

If Barbados was a majority Muslim country, we could expect to see those barbaric Islamic values, laws and punishments implemented in our country.

Egyptian democracy will be much like Afghan democracy. The people will choose their leaders, and those leaders will make decisions about which hands to chop off and when.

Don’t think so?

Consider the latest Egyptian poll:

59%: Say democracy is preferable to any other form of government.
95%: Say it’s good that Islam plays a large role in politics
85%: Say Islam’s influence on politics is good
82%: Believe adulterers should be stoned
84%: Believe apostates from Islam should face the death penalty
77%: Believe thieves should be flogged or have their hands cut off

Poll shows Egyptians in favor of democracy and stoning for adultery

18 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Politics, Religion

18 responses to “Why Democracy in Egypt will be a disaster for women and human rights in general

  1. Hi BPF:

    Muslims will likely be living in Barbados for the foreseeable future, and their population growth rate is expected to exceed that of Barbadian Christians. Therefore, while they can, knowledgeable Christians should try to engage them in discussion, with the hope that they can recognize the difference between the teachings of the Qur’an and the contrary traditions of Islam.

    Not all Muslims will be convinced by this method. However, those seeking Truth should find it. My hope is that they will influence those Muslims who stubbornly embrace irresponsible Islamic traditions, despite being aware that such traditions violate the explicit teachings of the Qur’an.

    Regards.

  2. Violet, the Qur'an? More like blood red.

    Qur’an 5:38 prescribes amputation.

    Three accurate and respected English translations:

    YUSUFALI: As to the thief, Male or female, cut off his or her hands: a punishment by way of example, from Allah, for their crime: and Allah is Exalted in power.

    PICKTHAL: As for the thief, both male and female, cut off their hands. It is the reward of their own deeds, an exemplary punishment from Allah. Allah is Mighty, Wise.

    SHAKIR: And (as for) the man who steals and the woman who steals, cut off their hands as a punishment for what they have earned, an exemplary punishment from Allah; and Allah is Mighty, Wise.

  3. Green Monkey

    Fear Extreme Islamists in the Arab World? Blame Washington
    by Jeff Cohen

    In the last year of his life, Martin Luther King Jr. questioned U.S. military interventions against progressive movements in the Third World by invoking a JFK quote: “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.”

    Were he alive to witness the last three decades of U.S. foreign policy, King might update that quote by noting: “Those who make secular revolution impossible will make extreme Islamist revolution inevitable.”

    For decades beginning during the Cold War, U.S. policy in the Islamic world has been aimed at suppressing secular reformist and leftist movements. Beginning with the CIA-engineered coup against a secular democratic reform government in Iran in 1953 (it was about oil), Washington has propped up dictators, coaching these regimes in the black arts of torture and mayhem against secular liberals and the left.

    In these dictatorships, often the only places where people had freedom to meet and organize were mosques — and out of these mosques sometimes grew extreme Islamist movements. The Shah’s torture state in Iran was brilliant at cleansing and murdering the left – a process that helped the rise of the Khomeini movement and ultimately Iran’s Islamic Republic.

    Growing out of what M.L. King called Washington’s “irrational, obsessive anti-communism,” U.S. foreign policy also backed extreme Islamists over secular movements or government that were either Soviet-allied or feared to be.

    In Afghanistan, beginning before the Soviet invasion and evolving into the biggest CIA covert operation of the 1980s, the U.S. armed and trained native mujahedeen fighters — some of whom went on to form the Taliban. To aid the mujahedeen, the U.S. recruited and brought to Afghanistan religious fanatics from the Arab world — some of whom went on to form Al Qaeda. (Like these Washington geniuses, Israeli intelligence — in a divide-and-conquer scheme aimed at combating secular leftist Palestinians — covertly funded Islamist militants in the occupied territories who we now know as Hamas.)

    Most of this is not obscure history.

    Except in U.S. mainstream media.

    One of the mantras on U.S. television news all day Friday was: Be fearful of the democratic uprisings against U.S. allies in Egypt (and Tunisia and elsewhere). After all, we were told by Fox News and CNN and Chris Matthews on MSNBC, it could end up as bad as when “our ally” in Iran was overthrown and the extremists came to power in 1979.

    Such talk comes easy in U.S. media where Egyptian victims of rape and torture in Mubarak’s jails are never seen. Where it’s rarely emphasized that weapons of repression used against Egyptian demonstrators are paid for by U.S. taxpayers. Where Mubarak is almost always called “president” and almost never “dictator” (unlike the elected president of Venezuela).

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeff-cohen/fear-extreme-islamists-in_b_815783.html

  4. The man wiv no name!!

    always maintained they should NEVER have been invited to live in Bim in the first place. my advice having been ignored, the ‘caan bear tuh face reality’ Bajans will now pay the price!

  5. bajan to the bone

    to man with no name… these ppl happily came to our shoress but others were brought here in shackless .. weren;t they.Whose to say that they way of life is wrong but all the excessive drinkingg andd partying and the so called wukking up culture was the right culture to bring to bim.Donot forget, this land belonged to ppl such as the arawaks and caribs before but yet htye were forced off their land.Also pls note that alot of the indians/muslims who are in bim are second and third generation barbadians,similar to most of the blacks around here, so who is to say that they shouldnot be around here but yet the whites and blacks should be around here. Do you know that they are many converted blacks in bim as well who corverted not out of fear but they read andd their hearts said it is the right thing to do.Are you syaing they should be kicked out of bim to? The people of egypt want a democracy and it is their way of living,who are we to say that their way of lif eis wrong and ours is right?Look at all the western countries, do you think because their ways maybe wrong that the governments of iran or sya saudi shud invade and change their governments too..Think logical for once

  6. 148

    Let me get this straight. The majority of Egyptians want Islam to play a rule in the running of the ir country, and you want to dictate upon them how you want the country to be run?????

  7. Rohan Frederick

    I’ve always said anyone who leave their country of birth, and go to live in another man’s country should abide by that country’s rules. One should not try to bring their previous country’s rule to try and govern another man country. If you want to live like that stay where you were born in the first place. No one is stopping you from practicing your own religion, but don’t try to change my society to suite or please you! That’s my opinion, and I am a foreigner living in Barbados.

  8. The man wiv no name!!

    I agree with Rohan n, ‘Bajan to the bone’, ur just talking *hite as usual, no more than i expect from a Bajan!

  9. surprise surprise

    i was waiting for bfp to bring out some propaganda articles using the events in egypt to peddle their usual anti-islamic agenda. and they have not disapointed. so predictable. i bet if you go and read some right wing bigoted sites you will see where bfp lifted these articles from.

    get it into your stupid heads bfp.

    muslims have been in barbados for close to 100 years and we plan to go nowhere. i am a third generation muslim and more barbadian than some of your partners who were born in the us!!!!!

  10. The man wiv no name!!

    ‘surprise, surprise’, u may b, for now, till u decide to ‘turn’ , but the question is, ‘who invited u here’?!!

  11. The man wiv no name!!

    I would never tek a ride pun de neck of a snake!!

  12. bajan to the bone

    @man wiv no name… they came freely unlike our forefathers and mothers who came in shackles…And to Rohan ,you fail to realise that alot the ppl were born in these countries and are 3rd generation as well… what shit r u on with about bringing their customs form their countries.When will you get it in ur thick head that just because they look like indians doe snot mean that they are born in india or asia,its like saying all black ppl are born in africa.The main concern for the ppl around the world is that this can lead to consequences for the jewssssss…..true jew loving bfp?

  13. Hi Violet:

    The only document that no one can find offence is a blank page. You have declared your conclusion and then presented verses out of their context as supporting evidence. Anyone can cause confusion by doing that. For example, this is God’s instruction as recorded in the Bible:

    “Do not spare them; put to death men and women, children and infants, cattle and sheep, camels and donkeys.’” (1 Samuel 15:3b).

    Am I, or anyone living today supposed to carry out this instruction? Was the instruction justified when it was declared? What was the offense that merited such a punishment? Was it a one-time event or a perpetual instruction.

    Do you see how irresponsible it is to simply quote verses outside of their context?

    Regards,
    Grenville

  14. surprise surprise

    how many times do i have to tell this idiot that noone invited me. i was born here. get it into your thick skull. nobody invited my father or mother either. they were both born here. my grandfather came here because he wanted to. no frigging body aint invite he!

    are you going to go back to africa or europe or wherever your ancestors came from? because not one person on this rock can claim indigenous heritage.

  15. maat

    @Green Monkey

    Hear hear and I wish more people here here, would hear hear.

    Peace

  16. The man wiv no name!!

    ‘surprise, surprise’, i can c that ur a ****head who simply doesn’t get the point, n, as a Muslim n, regrettably a Bajan, why should i b surprised! d point is, *rat, dat i would prefer to be invited to live where i do, if it wasn’t the ancestral home of my people, instead of barging my way in whether the natives wanted me there or not. I expect u to be too much of a ****-head to onstan dah! i was INVITED to live where i do, at the moment! i would PREFER that my people hadn’t been transported to Bim in shackles. what excuse do u and ur people have for FORCING your unwelcome presence on Barbadians!

  17. Extinguisher

    To:-
    The man wiv no name!!

    “Forcing” as what u may call it.So why do many countless barbadians “force” themselves on others when they go overseas for, is it not for greener pastures.It’s because of “us and our people” many barbadians were able to raise and send school their children , and make a better life for themselves, when our ancestors first came to these shores 60 or more years ago.And yes I’m a second generation bajan , and as “bajan to the bone” pointed out , just because we look indian doesn’t mean we all come from india or pakistan.Get that thru ur thick head!!!

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