Cameron Electric Vehicles aiming to help Barbados go green!

Another Cameron electric-bicycle tour coming to Barbados in October

Barbados and being environmentally green

submitted by: Cameron EV Electric Vehicles

It was grand to see the media treatment regarding Arbor Day.

A Nation News newspaper article on Sep 23, 2010 featuring a tree planting at the Accra Beach Hotel & Spa caught my reading. The article stated that the Accra Beach Hotel & Spa is a ‘certified green hotel’. Investigation of this ‘green hotel certification’ revealed the Accra Beach Hotel & Spa is registered with ‘Green Globe’ for membership and certification. Well done to the Accra Beach Hotel Green Team.

With ten (10) resorts, hotels and guesthouses in Barbados having Green Globe Accreditation it is evident tourists are concerned about the environment.

With the testing of electric power-assisted bicycles (e-bikes) by CameronEV-Electric Vehicles in Barbados, (with three (3) e-bikes and over 2,000 km traveled over the past year) the lack of environmental awareness in Barbados is evident in most places we traveled.

Having Green Globe Certification should be more than something one does for the tourist trade; it should involve residents, businesses and government, as well as tourists. If tourists are insisting on environmentally aware hotels and resorts, then residents, businesses and governments of the host countries should be participating as well.

For a start about learning about recycling in Barbados visit http://www.gogreenbarbados.com.

The concept of Barbados obtaining Green Globe Accreditation is worth considering, since there is concern that Barbados is becoming a city-state with urbanization (Nation News-Save Scotland District article, Sep 23, 2010). Perhaps the government of Barbados should consider hosting an international environmental-friendly-concerns & alternate-energy conference. Barbados has the means to lead the way with its’ solar, wind and water energy sources.

A goal for Cameron Industries (Barbados), of which CameronEV-Electric Vehicles & CameronAE- Alternate Energy will be part, would be to obtain the first Green Global accreditation for a business (wholesale/retail) and transportation (mass transportation, rental) in Barbados.

This Green Global accreditation can commence once the business registration process in Barbados is complete and the Ministry of Transportation & Works and the Vehicle Licensing Authority realise the electric power-assisted bicycles (e-bikes) are not motorcycles with engines but are electric power- assisted bicycles with a motor similar to that found in your washing machine.

Cameron Industries (Barbados) wants to investigate expanding into electronic parts recycling in addition to CameronEV-Electric Vehicles & CameronAE-Alternate Energy in Barbados and the rest of the Caribbean during our return in October 2010.

We’re coming to Barbados in October. Stop us and have a talk!

We are easy to see on the road as we ride the e- bikes, we operate out of Rockley for the most part.

Previous BFP articles on electric bicycles

April 25, 2010: Electric Bicycle test in Barbados: Cost of traveling 176kms: US$1

November 5, 2009: Barbados Electric Bicycle Experience – Great, until Sugar Hill

Cameron e-bikes

1946 Raymond LaBrosse St Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Tel: 1-613-830-4455 Website: www.cameronev.com

Email: sales@cameronev.com

Skype: CameronEV   Twitter: cameronev

17 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Energy, Environment, Technology

17 responses to “Cameron Electric Vehicles aiming to help Barbados go green!

  1. Jason Stanley

    Great if the Import Duty is waived…
    What would the price be then?
    What about Road Tax and Insurance?
    Same as Motorcycle 0r Bicycle?
    ie. $180 or $25 per year RT………….?

  2. HomeGrown

    I like the idea but BL&P kills me, how can this be feasible here with our electric rates?

  3. Exactly!!

    Electricity charges are horrendous.

    And the pollution involved comes out of our Spring Garden generating plant
    instead of out of the individual exhaust system.

    These electric bikes are not green.

    They may be quiet..yes, but as long as they charge-up via fossil-fuel-generated electricity
    the pollution buck is being passed to BL&Power.

    For them to be truly green
    they’d have to charge via wind-power, sun-power or wave-power

  4. HomeGrown

    I agree exactly, just tried of saying the same thing over and over, google: greenwashing. Just because someone says their product is environmentally friendly it isn’t necessarily the case.

  5. A couple of things…..
    I agree rates for current from BL&P are indeed higher than a lot of other countries look at how the power is generated.
    Barbados with wind-power, sun-power & wave-power, I know the resources are there and yes I have charged in Barbados with wind-power & sun-power at the Barbados Ecolodge in Mellowes, St. Joseph. We are working on having the ‘green’ capability easier to obtain.
    Will current be cheaper using wind-power, sun-power & wave-power as a source? I doubt it. Mind you the import excise tax is ‘0%’ for bringing in solar or wind power generation systems to Barbados, I hope people know that.
    The e-bikes are more environmentally friendly than any gas-powered vehicle with a remarkably smaller carbon footprint.
    They are one of the options to be available hopefully in the near future for use in Barbados.

  6. Green Monkey

    I have a question re. the issue of charging batteries from BL&P power, maybe some reader could answer.

    1)Is there significantly less load on the BL&P system in the overnight hours (say between 9pm and 6am) as opposed to day time and early evening working hours?

    2)During the off-peak hours are the BL&P generators still running and burning roughly the same amount of fuel oil as they are during the peak daytime hours. (I seem to remember reading somewhere that, for system stability reasons, generators have to be kept running continuously even though they might be capable of producing more electricity than the demand would justify.)

    While we wait in eager anticipation of green energy generation from wind, solar etc., if both 1 & 2 above are correct, then it could still be a net benefit to use the e bikes if they would mostly be charged in the overnight hours when electrical demand from other sources is down but the BL&P generators are running anyway.

  7. 133

    The wheel on the meter outside your house
    will still be spinning at whatever rate,
    regardless of what load Spring Garden is under, or not.

  8. HomeGrown

    Mr. CameronEV-Electric Vehicles says he charged his bike here: Barbados Ecolodge in Mellowes, St. Joseph. We are working on having the ‘green’ capability easier to obtain.

    Really now how feasible is this? My electric bill is $90.00/mo– the only major appliance that I have running is a refrigerator.

    Mr. CameronEV-Electric Vehicles says: Mind you the import excise tax is ‘0%’ for bringing in solar or wind power generation systems to Barbados, I hope people know that.

    How many working class Bajans can afford the upfront costs of a PV or wind generator system with a longterm payback? Regardless of the duty exemption. In Barbados we all know that even duty exempt items are still expensive. And I believe that even if they could afford a system to generate their own power they would dedicate it to household utilities before a scooter.

  9. This is one answer to the posted questions from ‘Green Monkey’;

    Wonderful Questions

    Is it worth a utility i.e.: BL&P, (& as I am in Ottawa, ON, Canada for a good portion of the year at the moment Ontario Hydro & Ottawa Hydro) moving to a usage-time-of-day pay scheme as there is less load on the current/power generation system?

    The equipment used to generate the current is installed at some initial cost which is finite.
    Maintenance is dependant on infrastructure and labour costs.
    Shareholders that invested on a power utility expect a return on investment so there must be a specific level of return.
    Actual current/power generation is dependant on the cost of the energy resource employed, when has the cost of sun-power increased the manner ‘oil’ has.
    The utilities must maintain a level of return for investors which can be consistent. The cost of producing the current/power is a factor with the manner current/power is generated with ‘oil’ type resources. It is important to remember the equipment installed has a limit, I have never heard of Barbados having to endure ‘brownouts’ during peak periods ie: business hours and early evenings. I have in Ottawa been advised to lower usage as there could be a ‘brownout’.
    The cost of producing current/power is dependant on the cost of the resource at the moment it is bought; it has little to do with the time-of-day.
    Load Balancing of the generators is more of a factor where utilities would enjoy having a steady stream of users 24/7.

    Would still be a net benefit to use the e-bikes if they would mostly be charged in the overnight hours?

    Here in Ottawa, ON, Canada we do have a rudimentary usage-time-of-day pay scheme. With charging the e-bike batteries it is cheaper by about 3 cents CDN per battery set to charge over-night, double that for cost in Barbados BBD. Be advised charging an e-bike with an over-night charger is very similar to charging a laptop, it takes time and little current/power.

    Charging the battery-sets with wind-power, sun-power & wave-power in Barbados is more possible than doing the same in Canada and a lot of other parts of the world.

  10. Answer to HomeGrown’s comment: ‘And I believe that even if they could afford a system to generate their own power they would dedicate it to household utilities before a scooter.’

    I do agree with the comment.

    I will ask though how much they spend on gas for their automobile though that they could reduce cost-wise & for their carbon-footprint.
    I use the e-bikes consistently in Barbados, going to meetings, going grocery shopping, and the things that I can do myself. I tend not to drive in Barbados at night for a number of reasons.
    I use the e-bikes consistently in Canada from Apr to Oct going to meetings, going grocery shopping, and the things that I can do myself. I tend not to drive at night in Canada for the same reasons I don’t in Barbados, safety first.
    I have tested for the authorities using e-bikes in Winter-Time in January. You do need a snowmobile suit and the e-bikes work great. Interfacing with other traffic i.e.: cars, trucks & busses on the narrower roads is very stressful even with a police escort. I do not recommend riding in the Canadian Winter interfacing with traffic at all.

    Answer to HomeGrown’s question: How many working class Bajans can afford the upfront costs of a PV or wind generator system with a long-term payback?

    I have seen a lot of solar-powered water heating assist systems in Barbados. I suspect the government provides assistance somehow to set solar-powered water heating assist systems in place.

    How many solar-powered water heating assist systems would exist without government assistance?

    PV (solar) systems are expensive. Remember to factor in Building permits, building assessments it adds up.

    Wind generator systems, basic systems are not expensive but getting clearance permits can be. Without a mega wind farm the results are questionable.

    CameronAE has been developing a ‘urban-type’ Wind generator system for a couple of years. The Barbados Ecolodge will be the testing ground hopefully. Now to get the Barbados government and the Canadian National Research Council involved takes more time than the testing.

  11. Note to the last CameronEV comment….
    The Barbados government and the Canadian National Research Council are ‘not involved’ as having them ‘involved’ takes more time than the testing.

  12. HomeGrown

    *I use the e-bikes consistently in Barbados, going to meetings, going grocery shopping, and the things that I can do myself. I tend not to drive in Barbados at night for a number of reasons.*

    I take it you are single…scooters would apply to young, single foreigners, not Bajans, not even me as a single mother. Sorry, but I am not convinced these are applicable here given the current state of affairs.

    As far as the solar systems yes they were subsidized I believe via tax credits.

  13. The demographic profile of people that I have seen, known and researched considering to use or that use e-bikes is quite varied.

    In the case of e-bike use in Barbados I perceive no difference in the variance of the demographic profile from what I have seen in Canada and gathered in my market research from around the world.

    One of the BLP readers (John Da Silva) remarked that electric vehicles could satisfy 95% of people on 95% of their journeys in Barbados. (BLP Posting: Everything worked out fine until the bike couldn’t make it coming up to Sugar Hill. BLP Search Keyword: e-bike) I recognize e-bikes are a subset of electric vehicles and e-bikes are ‘not’ suited to everyone’s use for a variety of reasons. They have suited my use fine as a method of affordable, sustainable transportation and I am not young.

    The testing of e-bikes in Barbados over the past year has revealed a number of things about using e-bikes in Barbados. The positive factors outnumber the negative factors and all the negative factors have been corrected or minimized in the case of state of the condition of some roads or being caught in a downpour of rain and seeing how slippery the roads can become.

    Working with Bajans to be environmentally friendly is for the benefit of everyone on Barbados. Becoming a millionaire dealing with environmental concerns is ‘not’ going to happen. Being able to make a sustainable living and generating employment for others is possible.

    Having Barbados take a lead in environmental matters for the people on the island, in the Caribbean and around the rest of the world can happen and would be nice to see and be part of.

    It is more about providing options more than convincing.

  14. HomeGrown

    That means that 95% of Barbadians are single and travel alone 95% of the time. Huh?

  15. Part of what we do when on our visits while testing is talk to people, actually give them a chance to see and use what we are doing and what we are assessing.

    BLP posted our contact information at the bottom of the posting for the article. People, businesses and government are invited to contact us. Obtaining information and assessing options is always better than not being informed and not learning what is available.

    Talking and learning helps everyone.

  16. Environmental Planner

    Cameron for a local Green Business programme check out Green Business Barbados at the Future centre Trust. It is a localized and affordable option to a green business programme not tailored to hotels but to offices and business. Please visit us at futurecentretrust.org for more information.

    Lani Edghill
    Green Business Barbados Coordinator
    625-2020

  17. Pingback: CameronEV completes electric vehicle tests in Barbados | Barbados Free Press