Noel Lynch and The Nation newspaper – Partners in hypocrisy

Nation Newspaper selective in quest for morality and justice

Adrian Loveridge writes…

“I must admit that I find the editorial in the NATION today (Monday 23rd August) rather hypocritical.

Where was the same indig(nation) when the then Minister of Tourism refused to share a radio studio with me?

Imagine for one second if it was the other way around.At the end of the now infamous Brass Tacks programme, David Ellis asked (Tourism Minister Noel Lynch) what would have been a perfectly legitimate question in the vast majority of democracies.

Sadly, until we have some form effective integrity legislation there will always be suspicion of our aspiring and elected members of Parliament.

Is it right that anyone standing for election should receive a cheques made payable to him or her personally, without the general public being able to consult a register or website to confirm these donations and where the financial support is coming from?

The Nation appears very selective in its quest for journalistic morality and justice.”

Adrian Loveridge commenting on BFP’s article Former Barbados Tourism Minister Noel Lynch gets a taste of his own medicine

Pathetic Noel Lynch story continues

The below was written by Barbados Free Press editor Cliverton…

The day after we published our article about former Tourism Minister Noel Lynch crying the blues after being ejected from a radio show, the Nation newspaper printed another interview with the “Instant Millionaire” de-elected politician. Reading his statements, we didn’t know whether to laugh, cry or vomit.

After using all his power and authority as a Minister of Government to prevent tourism industry critic Adrian Loveridge from appearing on public radio and newspapers, Noel Lynch has the nerve to grovel and whine…

“I think if you are going to go down that road, in which you are prohibiting people coming as a private citizen – even as a politician  – I don’t hold political office at this time, so I’m a private citizen.

So to prohibit me from coming on the show, totally sends the wrong message to Barbadians about the Government-owned station.

Where are we going with this?”

Noel Lynch quoted in The Nation article The best and worst of times

Noel Lynch… private citizen?

Ok Noel… answer the following questions or STFU!….

1/ What were your personal assets prior to election as a Member of Parliament?

2/ What was your declared income for your term as a Member of Parliament?

3/ What were your personal assets upon “retirement” by the voters?

4/ How the hell could you have purchased your plantation and built your new home on your MP’s income alone?

Here are the relevant newspaper articles in full so that when the newspapers erase them to suit their political agendas, they will still be here as part of the public record…

Nation News…

EDITORIAL – The best and worst of times

THERE OUGHT TO HAVE BEEN much purging of the soul in radio land in the last few days. We hope so, for the sake of Mr Noel Lynch and the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) operatives who did not, or could not, welcome him into the studios of FM100.7 last Thursday night.

We know there has been much reflection; but regrettably not of the profoundest of thinking.

The protagonists would rather point a finger at the messenger than embrace introspection; and the victim of circumstances, apparently overwhelmed by public embarrassment, would segue himself into a state of denial.

The facts simply are Mr Lynch was invited by co-host Andrew Mason to be a guest on Best & Mason, a weekly sport commentary programme on a station that styles itself as Quality Radio. Having given his name at CBC’s point of entrance, Mr Lynch – in his own words – went through the guard process, went upstairs in the studio and actually sat in the studio.

Fellow guest Stephen Leslie, assistant director of sport at the Cave Hill Campus of the University of the West Indies, confirmed Mr Lynch sat next to him. Then Mr Lynch was “called out of the room” and asked to leave by the show producer – obviously under instructions.

Now, if that isn’t being put out, we don’t know what is!

And that Mr Lynch, politician that he is, could give our Associate Managing Editor Tim Slinger a lengthy lamentation on the sad state of affairs goes well towards Mr Lynch’s deep disappointment and hurt.

But to be fair to the former Member of Parliament, he did paint a broader picture than of his own unhappiness.

“What I find to be more serious about the entire thing,” he said, “is that at the end of the day it reflects badly on the administration [presumably CBC’s] – and the Government’s administration . . . .”

Host Mason has been quoted as saying that never in the 15 years he has been moderator of Best & Mason has he had to submit an actual list or get permission from management to bring guests on the show. 

Even so, CBC is yet to state what these processes of invitation, which Mr Mason reportedly knows nothing of, are. These procedures – which were not carried out in the case of Mr Lynch’s visit – are yet to be identified.

Still, we are told Mr Lynch would be welcome next time. We wait with bated breath. 

Parochial as the issue might appear to be in the eyes of some at home, the Caribbean media look on with interest at a country that boasts responsible and exemplary public media conduct, and wonder at this melodrama.

Barbados has done better; much better!

Lynch’s side of CBC story

ON Thursday, August 19, the DAILY NATION ran a story headlined: LYNCH PUT OUT. The story stated that former Minister of Tourism Noel Lynch had been barred from participating in the Best And Mason show at the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

In a newscast on Thursday night, however, and also yesterday morning on Voice Of Barbados, Mr Lynch denied that he was “put out”.

“The issue of me being ejected and put out, is totally untrue,” he said.

However, Stephen Leslie, assistant director of sports at the University of the West Indies, who was the second guest on the programme, told the SATURDAY SUN last night that both he and co-host Carlisle Best were in the studio when they were joined by Noel Lynch who sat next to him.

He said prior to Lynch joining them he had been told that he would not be allowed on the show, but was in the studio. He was then asked to leave by the producer.

“Lynch sat beside me and he was called out of the room by the producer,” Leslie said.

In light of Mr Lynch’s public denial and his interpretation of what it is to be “put out”, the SATURDAY SUN, today brings verbatim what Mr Lynch told Associate Managing Editor Tim Slinger on Wednesday night on the CBC compound, shortly after the incident took place.

I was invited since last week to do the programme Best And Mason to essentially talk about cricket, the development of Barbadian and West Indian cricket by extension, issues marketing and the branding and where West Indies cricket is going, and any observations that I had, regarding why West Indies had reached the state it had reached and if I could offer any recommendations and suggestions about how we could improve the state of both local cricket and by extension, regional cricket.

I have been on this programme before. As a matter of fact, incidentally the last time I’ve been on this programme was in 2007, about a couple of months after the Cricket World Cup was held here and I was on with Chris Sinckler.

Defending position

At the time I was Minister of Tourism and clearly I was defending the position about how we had done as a country, in terms of receipts from Cricket World Cup, in terms of arrivals, spending, etc. and Chris was on.

Clearly he was in an alternative position on how he felt about the World Cup. But the point is, clearly the Barbados Labour Party was in office – Chris was aspiring to political office and he was on the programme with me.

Now Andrew Mason invited me to come on this programme. I’ve been on even before the actual programme in 2007.

But tonight, I came on, went through the process – gave my name at the gate, went through the guard process, went upstairs in the studio and actually sat in the studio, and I was told by the person who was actually working, the operator, that he was informed that I could not be on the programme.

Not approved

Subsequent to that, Mark Seale, who is the Head of Sports, came as management and said he was advised that I could not actually participate in the programme tonight and therefore I left the studio. And here we are.

They said my participation was never approved by the management of CBC, for me to be actually be on the programme.

As Andrew is saying, he never at any stage during the 15 years that he’s been the moderator of the programme been asked to submit to anyone an actual list, or get any permission from management to bring guests on the show.

It was certainly news to him that I couldn’t participate.

For one thing, I think it is sad where we are going.

CBC has three or four radio stations, that’s the only television station – I agree that I’m an active politician.

But even if you wanted to prohibit politicians from being on CBC, I’m not here actively talking about politics, we are talking about cricket development, which I think is a fundamental part of our cultural and economic development and social development as well.

Private citizen

I think if you are going to go down that road, in which you are prohibiting people coming as a private citizen – even as a politician  – I don’t hold political office at this time, so I’m a private citizen.

So to prohibit me from coming on the show, totally sends the wrong message to Barbadians about the Government-owned station.

Where are we going with this?

More serious

What I find to be more serious about the entire thing is that at the end of the day, it reflects badly on the administration and the Government’s administration.

It reflects badly on the Acting Prime Minister, who as far as I know, has responsibility for broadcasting – I think it falls under his portfolio.

Remember, I was his political opponent in the last elections or he was mine, however you want to put it, I beat him in 2003 and he beat me in 2008.

So to tell someone that they can’t come, reflects badly on him. I wonder what type of action these people are taking?

I just don’t get it.

(Message from BFP Cliverton: And, not to forget our next article… “Nation News Photo Editor calls Noel Lynch “Barney”  LOL!)

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