Daily Archives: March 26, 2010

Thumbs Up for Barbados Prime Minister as he cancels Vybz Kartel, Mavado concert

Auntie Moses plants a kiss on the PM for his leadership.

David Thompson says no to violent Jamaican dance hall culture

Prime Minister Thompson just delivered an unequivocal message: We the people of Barbados don’t want the violent dance hall culture of Jamaica in our country and we sure don’t want our young people exposed to the people who promote this destructive influence.

The PM spoke in a very politic manner, giving as little offense as he could in the circumstances. One has to admire not only the statesmanship of his delivery but also the leadership he exhibited by wading into a mess that had become important enough to require the intervention of the Prime Minister.

Said the PM, “I don’t feel in this particular instance people should be demonised for a well-intentioned effort that could have gone awry, but in circumstances where there is public concern and where the State needs to intervene to protect our young people we will do it…”

Violent culture is a circle – not a linear cause and effect

We won’t re-hash the entire controversy here – except to say that Jamaican violence is a circular problem that is fed by the music of the day and the personalities associated with the music.

Folks can argue about where the circle of Jamaican cultural violence started but that doesn’t really matter – The violence inspires the music that inspires the tribalism that inspires the violence that inspires the music… and on and on and on.

The violence is not a linear problem with specific causes and effects – but a circle that feeds upon itself.

Prime Minister David Thompson just damaged that circle by removing some of the music and conflict personalities from our society – and Barbados is safer and better off for his decision.

Thanks, Prime Minister!

Now – What about the Police leadership?

Or, to be more specific: is conflict between senior police officers negatively impacting the Royal Barbados Police Force?

In the last few days the Barbados public was treated to the disgusting spectacle of Police Commissioner Darwin Dottin having to admit that his Deputy undermined his orders and authority regarding the Vybz Kartel, Mavado concert. Dottin had announced that the police would not grant a license for the show. Hinds countermanded that decision in public.

And the very worst of it was that Commissioner Dottin had to hear about it on the public radio!

The Prime Minister was forced to step in due in part to the leadership punch-up between Dottin and Hinds. That too is embarrassing for all concerned.

So… who should resign, Dottin or Hinds?

That gets complex because it is more than time for Dottin to go – but in this case Hinds was wrong to go behind the Commissioner’s back.

Perhaps the answer is to fire retire both of them and promote one of the three people we know of in the RBPF who have the right combination of professionalism and leadership talent.

Who are they? Ha! We won’t say because that would surely poison their chances. Let’s just hope that something big happens soon to provide the kind of leadership that the RBPF deserves.

Further Reading

This Nation article is a pretty good synopsis of the disgusting public quarrel between Dottin and Hinds…

Angry Chief

THE DECISION yesterday to give the green light for this weekend’s controversial Vybz Kartel and Mavado show has opened a potential row between Commissioner of Police Darwin Dottin and his deputy Bertie Hinds.

In an exclusive interview, a visibly upset Dottin told THE NATION yesterday that he first learnt of the decision to grant licences for the show through a radio news flash while on his way to Grantley Adams International Airport.

“It sends a very bad image and message that the Commissioner of Police has been having discussions on these issues and nobody had the decency to consult him.

“It reflects very poorly on the administration of the force,” he added.

Confirmed reports indicated that Hinds, who acts as commissioner while Dottin is on leave, made the decision to grant the promoters requested licences for the show during a meeting yesterday.

When contacted for comment that he acted contrary to the force’s protocol, Hinds would only say: “I have nothing to say, full-stop.”

… continue reading this article at The Nation: Angry Chief

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