Barbados Citizens taking action against development-at-any-cost business and political elites

A victory for Citizen Action – but the fight never stops!

Updated November 28, 2011

I write to you all today bearing good news for Environmental protection in Barbados.

It was announced yesterday in the Barbados Today online magazine that the proposed  development for Long Beach and the Chancery Lane Wetlands was “scrapped”. According to Government officials from the Town & Country Planning Department, the application for the development was pulled. This is a GREAT day in Barbados history as we constantly struggle to preserve the natural beauty of our island.

BFP reader “A” (who never said if we should use their name)

Original story first published March 20, 2010…

Chancery Lane – Long Beach movement latest sign of citizens empowering themselves

There was a time in this country, and it wasn’t so long ago, that the business and political elites could do pretty much as they wanted without encountering too much resistance from ordinary folks. As long as the land developers could pay big money in “consulting fees” and “campaign donations”, the political elites would eventually provide the land-use approvals – knowing that cowed Bajan citizens would keep their mouths shut as their island was paved over one project at a time.

Oh sure, the developers knew they’d have to order all the kitchens and bathrooms at a silly price from a certain supplier in Miami and that a few “consulting companies” in New York and the Caymans would have to be paid to, well, “consult”. They knew that a certain politician’s nephew would have to be hired during the construction phase – but all this “juice” to the controlling political elites was factored in like any other cost of doing business.

There was a certainty about the process that guaranteed a smooth path after the Prime Minister of the day gave his assurances. “Consultants” had to be paid to arrange meetings with the PM and other officials, but that’s life in Barbados and the Caribbean in general.

Before the internet, land developers and government officials could hide their plans and schemes. Often the first the locals knew about anything was when they woke up to the sound of bulldozers.

Complaints from the locals and troublemakers were handled by a combination of ignoring the voices of concern or hiring them. With over 50% of the workers in Barbados employed by the government in one way or another it is not difficult to envision why individual Bajans are reluctant to complain about government-approved land development. Citizens couldn’t (and still can’t) rely upon the news media at all, and the courts… well, the people who ran the courts were the same folks who ran the government so there wasn’t much hope for justice. Citizens got that message pretty quickly when David Simmons went from Attorney General to Chief Justice as fast as you could say “de fix is in.”

Times were good for the developers and for the politicians.

Turning public lands into private profits became virtually a science in Barbados over the last 20 years.

It was nothing to have a farmer refused development permission for decades and then a week after he sold out for nothing to a connected lawyer the permissions came through. Scrub land became worth millions with the click of a pen. That’s millions for the developers and the politicians, but not the farmer who usually uttered nothing more than “What can you do?” because in Barbados there are no rules against that sort of corruption.

BLP Government Minister Gline Clarke: protected by Barbados news media

Even in 2006 when Public Works Minister Gline Clarke was caught building a house on land that his government expropriated for “public housing” the Barbados news media ignored the story and still does to this day. (See Barbados Government Minister Gline Clarke – House and Mercedes On Expropriated Land)

American developer Matthew Kerins got plucked like a chicken for US$2 million in consulting and other fees when citizens opposed his Barbados water park.

Caribbean Splash, the internet and an awaking sense of citizen power

The easy times for the politicians and the developers came to an abrupt end during the Caribbean Splash debacle in 2006. The difference was the internet.

American developer Matthew Kerins received Prime Minister Owen Arthur’s go ahead to build a waterpark in the Graeme Hall watershed. According to Mr. Kerins himself, he paid some US$2 million dollars in “consulting” and other fees and met with Prime Minister Arthur, who assured Mr. Kerins that the Caribbean Splash waterpark was welcome in Barbados. (See Caribbean Splash Waterpark Developer Says Barbados Government “Cannot Back Out Of The Deal…”)

Neither Matthew Kerins nor Mr. Arthur counted on the public’s outrage and the ability of ordinary citizens to organise and share information using blogs, FaceBook, websites, emails and petitions.

When the BLP government had to back down, a betrayed Kerins announced that he’d paid his “consulting” fees to the tune of a couple of million dollars and the government couldn’t back out of the deal. HA! Wrong thing to say ’bout hey. Everything worked fine until Kerins said one word about “consulting fees” and then it was game over for obvious reasons.

Culture-shocked Kerins didn’t get the fact that everything has to be kept secret for the process to work. HA! Tough luck, sucker.

After running an insulting newspaper advert calling the citizens who opposed him “snakes in the cane field”, Matthew Kerins went home to New Jersey like the plucked chicken he was: older and wiser but still missing two million U.S. tail feathers.

That, my friends, was accomplished by ordinary folks who’d had enough and used the internet to rapidly organise with an effectiveness that wasn’t possible before.

Chancery Lane Hotel Proposal: Citizens took control, distributed hidden information on the Internet

Government and the developers know there is a lot to be said for restricting the amount of information available to citizens. That’s why developers are not required to place proposals and environmental reports on the internet. That’s why only a handful of paper copies are made available during the most inconvenient times and usually with highly restrictive rules. Can’t photocopy! Can’t make notes! Can’t read the 400 page report for more than 15 minutes even if nobody else is waiting to look at it!

And that is why Beachside Properties Inc. didn’t place their Chancery Lane – Long Beach reports on the internet for all to see.

God forbid that citizens actually get to read, understand and research the reports concerning what the Abed family want to do at Chancery Lane and Long Beach!

But last Thursday at the required public meeting with the Beachside Properties Inc, citizens held in their hands copies of the environmental reports and Ministry responses that were originally denied them – all thanks to the folks at the Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary who somehow managed to obtain copies of the reports and put them on the internet at their Chancery Lane – Long Beach resource page.

What a game changer that was! No thanks to the Thompson DLP government and no thanks to the Abed family.

It’s called “Participatory Democracy” by informed citizens. The politicians and their developer friends hate it!

Folks, not all development is bad for Barbados or has negative consequences for ordinary Bajans.

But not all development is good. Even the best plans and intentions can have adverse social and environmental impacts – and yes, development can even result in adverse economic consequences for the country.

Visitors come here because Barbados offers a unique combination of experiences, environment and culture that is found nowhere else in the world – but lately more and more visitors have been commenting that the very qualities that attracted them to Barbados in the first place are losing ground to unfettered and ill-planned development.

Many of our famous beaches are gone. Vistas that once were are now spoilt by concrete condos that block the sun and the sea from view. Smelly yellow-green effluent from unknown sources trickles onto sands at Bathsheba and other formerly-pristine areas.

The only public transportation plan that any of our governments have come up with is more autos on more roads for more hours each day.

Developers want to add ever more hotel rooms while our national occupancy rate barely cracks 50 percent. Shouldn’t we work on filling those empty rooms first before pouring more concrete into what remains of the unspoiled coastline?

We had better pay attention when diehard fans of Barbados start talking about St. Lucia and how that island and the people remind them of Barbados 30 years ago.

“Trust Us” doesn’t work for government or developers any longer

I don’t trust politicians who say that five paper copies of environmental reports are all that is required for a population of three hundred thousand. I don’t trust developers who think that sewage ponds are “natural wildlife habitat” and that they can safely manage the discharge of millions of kilos of liquid turds, urine and cleaning chemicals into the environment.

And I sure don’t trust any politician or government official who says that developers and hotel owners are responsible enough to operate and monitor their own sewerage treatment plants.

“Environmental Estate” nothing but a propaganda term

Memo to Developers and Politicians: Withholding information from the public is no longer tolerated or possible. Calling a condo an “environmental estate” is laughable. Thinking that using the word “sustainable” will fool the majority of the people is, well, unsustainable.

The development game has changed in Barbados – and it’s about time.

Further Reading

BFP March 14, 2010: Yes or No? Will Barbados Environment Minister Denis Lowe make a clear statement against development at Long Beach?

BFP March 7, 2010: Barbados Environmental Protection Department slams Long Beach development proposal

BFP March 5, 2010: Barbados Long Beach Development: Sewage treatment ponds called “creation of wetlands” !!!

BFP February 22, 2010: Long Beach developers, Barbados government – limiting citizen access to Environmental Impact Assessment Report

Here is the Nation News report on Thursday’s public meeting about the Chancery Lane / Long Beach project. Generally not a bad piece of reporting by the Nation. You should read the article on their website, but we’ll publish the whole thing here because The Nation has been known in the past to kill stories and change the historical record for political reasons…

“The past was erased, the erasure was forgotten, the lie became truth.”

“And if all others accepted the lie which the party imposed – if all records told the same tale – then the lie passed into history and became the truth.”

… from George Orwell’s famous novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (pages 78 & 37)

Hotel Heat (link to Nation story online)

THREE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES (UWI) professors, the Barbados National Trust and more than 500 worried people are trying to torpedo a $232 million hotel and condominium project proposed for the Long Beach/ Chancery Lane area of Christ Church.

Professors Robin Mahon, Julia Horrocks and Sean Carrington made their objection clear in a four-page report circulated Thursday night during a public meeting at St Christopher’s Primary School, Christ Church.

Watson and the professors argue that the “Long Beach Environmental Estate” proposed by businessman Anthony Abed and his family will cause untold damage to the 92-acre site that includes an important coastal wetland and what is believed to be an area rich in Amerindian history.

If the project goes ahead, it will mean a significant downgrading for “the last unspoilt beach land on the south coast” and “the last remaining major coastal pre-history site in Barbados”, according to the professors.

The project also threatens “the last remaining sand dune community of the south coast” and “the sole site in Barbados for the button mangrove”, they said.

Deep concern

Watson said: “There are many specifics that are of deep concern to the National Trust, specifics of a scientific nature which we will communicate separately to the Chief Town Planner.”

The trust did not want to appear to be obstructionist or anti-development, he said, but it was concerned about the last open space left to Barbadians, becoming the site of tourist development.

According to Watson, the time had come for Barbadians to ask themselves how far they were prepared to take development and “do we want to concretise this island from North Point to South Point?”

Like the professors, he spoke of the threatened loss of a wetland area, home to many species of birds, and of the possible closure of a chance for archaeologists to explore some parts of it.

Environmental planning consultant Lani Edghill also reported that she had collected more than 500 signatures for a petition against the development.

Thursday night’s meeting was called to release details of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) study done for the project being spearheaded by Beachside Properties Inc., a company owned by the Abeds.

Beachside Properties Inc. has applied for Town Planning permission to change the use of 92 acres, and hosting the public meeting is one of the conditions the Town Planning Department sets for considering such applications.

Justin Jennings-Wray of environmental consultants Stantec, said the developers had sought to mitigate the impact of whatever challenges were identified.

However, several of the more than 200 people attending the three-hour meeting raised concern about the bad smell likely to come from the proposed “advanced wastewater treatment plant”, noise during the construction phase, heavy vehicular traffic, limited access to the beach for recreation and about the area’s exposure to hurricanes.

Hurricane threat

Businessman Bob Verdun said that considering the threat posed by hurricanes, “it is sheer madness to build a hotel there”.

Hotelier Adrian Loveridge said the project did not make sense, given the fact that in the last 15 years 32 hotels had gone out of business and thousands of hotel rooms remained empty every night.

Joan Harvey-Ellis complained that Barbados did not have a good history of wastewater management.

Administrative director of the Future Centre Trust, Nicole Garofano, saw the development cutting down on the island’s open spaces.

Given the large number of impacts the study was forced to look at, she asked the developers: “Why don’t you consider somewhere else?”

One concern voiced was that the development, if launched, would send Chancery Lane land tax bills right through the roof in the next few years.

Developers say that investment flows for the project would total $232.5 million, with the cost of constructing the 4/5-star hotel put at $60 million.

The project is expected to create 450 construction jobs and 506 long-term jobs.

Foreign direct investment from lot and condominium sales to non- residents is estimated at $140 million. (TY)

33 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Corruption, Environment, Nature

33 responses to “Barbados Citizens taking action against development-at-any-cost business and political elites

  1. yatinkiteasy

    Pity the project at Enterprise Coast Rd was not stopped by citizens. They are building right on the cliff..how did TCP and the Coastal management people Ok such a thing that robs the public of yet another seaview. What about “Fishermans` Rights”…they are building right up to the edge of the Cliff…this Clubhouse for the wealthy!The name of it is The Palisades.They will soon start constructing a huge villa, again, right on the cliff!These things just make me sick.Following is a description on one Real Estate Agency`s web site.

    A stone’s throw from Atlantic Shores and Oistins Bay, this chic “beach contemporary’ residence enjoys a premier location on Barbados’ South coast, sited on a private lot affording the area’s best panoramas from an elevated position.

    “The Palisades” is an eminently designed development comprised of 16 townhouses and main house finished to a standard yet to be seen on the island’s South coast. Each residence will have access to a ‘terrace facility’ on the cliff with reaching of the ocean and Oistins Bay.

    Along with direct access to “Freights Bay” a secluded bay known only to locals and 600 m from ‘Miami Beach’, “The Palisades” will become the South coast’s preferred address.

  2. Politically tired

    yatinkiteasy
    I agree with you, another nightmare, ‘lets push the locals out’ situation. Here’s the link if anyone wants a look.
    http://www.igrealty.comproperty.php?propertyID=506

  3. Hants

    Unless something drastic and decisive is done, in 20 years Barbados will have a wall of Hotels ,Villas and Condos from St.Lucy along the coast to the Crane in St.Phillip.

    Driving from Bridgetown to Speightstown is no longer a pleasant experiance unless you are in an airconditioned Bimmer or Benz.

    Every Mp should be mandated to take a ZR from Bridgetown to Speightstown one day a week for one month.

    Then they might understand that Barbados needs to develop a plan to preserve the very few remaining windows to the sea.

  4. whistling frog

    Concerning the building on the cliff………..I thought one had to be 40 feet away from the cliff line,,,????????????

  5. whistling frog

    Long beach Ahhhhhh that serene,desolate,quiescent,nirvana reached area of Barbados…………..SooooooLoooong Nice to Have met you.

  6. whistling frog

    Hants me bwoy,,,with a bankrupt goverment you better believe we is gwine ram dem condos from here to there yahooo bucks flowing………,,,,,,,, heee haaaww giidy giddy up rawhide …..whooo weee.

  7. whistling frog

    Dear Yankiteasy,,,,, (Note well, sung to the tune of “Little Boxes”)…. Padded pockets ,padded pockets,all padded with $USdollars,,they are all padded and they all look like Padded Pockets and they all look just the same……………….

  8. whistling frog

    Please note whistling frog is neither BLP,DLP,ZZZ or affiliated with them thar peoples ofUWI who romanticisedly recreate history…………….

  9. Nostradamus

    yatinkiteasy

    You ask “…..how did TCP and the Coastal management people Ok such a thing…..”

    The answer is that they probably did not approve of it and recommended against it. I am guessing that the decision lay with The Minister which in this and the last administration was the PM. Which one may have been responsible? I don’t know. Maybe I am wrong but…….

  10. Long Beach Watchman

    @Nostradamus

    Don’t forget that the people in TCP and Coastal (as we learned last month in the case of the latter) also have their hands deep in the till. Btw, where was Dr. Lowe, the environment man, when the meeting was going on? Isn’t this his constituency? Wasn’t he the one telling us last year how the sand dunes at Long Beach need to be protected? I knew the fix was in when we learned that politically connected deep pockets were behind the project. They are all the same only their names change. These guys would sell their mothers let alone country. Lord save us!

  11. 500 signatures for petition against the development? There should have been an uproar by the people.

    Wake up Barbados

    Published on: 3/20/2010.

    by TREVOR YEARWOOD

    THREE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES (UWI) professors, the Barbados National Trust and more than 500 worried people are trying to torpedo a $232 million hotel and condominium project proposed for the Long Beach/ Chancery Lane area of Christ Church.

    Professors Robin Mahon, Julia Horrocks and Sean Carrington made their objection clear in a four-page report circulated Thursday night during a public meeting at St Christopher’s Primary School, Christ Church.

    Watson and the professors argue that the “Long Beach Environmental Estate” proposed by businessman Anthony Abed and his family will cause untold damage to the 92-acre site that includes an important coastal wetland and what is believed to be an area rich in Amerindian history.

    If the project goes ahead, it will mean a significant downgrading for “the last unspoilt beach land on the south coast” and “the last remaining major coastal pre-history site in Barbados”, according to the professors.

    The project also threatens “the last remaining sand dune community of the south coast” and “the sole site in Barbados for the button mangrove”, they said.

    Deep concern

    Watson said: “There are many specifics that are of deep concern to the National Trust, specifics of a scientific nature which we will communicate separately to the Chief Town Planner.”

    The trust did not want to appear to be obstructionist or anti-development, he said, but it was concerned about the last open space left to Barbadians, becoming the site of tourist development.

    According to Watson, the time had come for Barbadians to ask themselves how far they were prepared to take development and “do we want to concretise this island from North Point to South Point?”

    Like the professors, he spoke of the threatened loss of a wetland area, home to many species of birds, and of the possible closure of a chance for archaeologists to explore some parts of it.

    Environmental planning consultant Lani Edghill also reported that she had collected more than 500 signatures for a petition against the development.

    Thursday night’s meeting was called to release details of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) study done for the project being spearheaded by Beachside Properties Inc., a company owned by the Abeds.

    Beachside Properties Inc. has applied for Town Planning permission to change the use of 92 acres, and hosting the public meeting is one of the conditions the Town Planning Department sets for considering such applications.

    Justin Jennings-Wray of environmental consultants Stantec, said the developers had sought to mitigate the impact of whatever challenges were identified.

    However, several of the more than 200 people attending the three-hour meeting raised concern about the bad smell likely to come from the proposed “advanced wastewater treatment plant”, noise during the construction phase, heavy vehicular traffic, limited access to the beach for recreation and about the area’s exposure to hurricanes.

    Hurricane threat

    Businessman Bob Verdun said that considering the threat posed by hurricanes, “it is sheer madness to build a hotel there”.

    Hotelier Adrian Loveridge said the project did not make sense, given the fact that in the last 15 years 32 hotels had gone out of business and thousands of hotel rooms remained empty every night.

    Joan Harvey-Ellis complained that Barbados did not have a good history of wastewater management.

    Administrative director of the Future Centre Trust, Nicole Garofano, saw the development cutting down on the island’s open spaces.

    Given the large number of impacts the study was forced to look at, she asked the developers: “Why don’t you consider somewhere else?”

    One concern voiced was that the development, if launched, would send Chancery Lane land tax bills right through the roof in the next few years.

    Developers say that investment flows for the project would total $232.5 million, with the cost of constructing the 4/5-star hotel put at $60 million.

    The project is expected to create 450 construction jobs and 506 long-term jobs.

    Foreign direct investment from lot and condominium sales to non- residents is estimated at $140 million. (TY)

  12. Chris Peachment

    Don’t let a few facts get in the way of a good rant:

    1. The land along the cliff on Enterprise Coast Road is privately owned as part of the lot(s) on the opposite side of the road. There is no legal requirement for it to be left unsullied, despite what non-owners might feel.

    2. From a copy of the pamphlet issued by Coastal Zone Management Unit: “Cliff Top – Ten metre (10m) setback from most landward point of cliff undercut for building construction …”

    3. I assist in building new homes, and live nearby so I was interested to check the conditions at The Palisades cliff edge. I also thought they were laying out lines a bit too close to meet the 10 metre requirement, so one day, when a supervisor (architect/builder/engineer?) was on site, with his drawings, I approached and asked the question. I was shown the drawings with appropriate dimensions and upon close inspection I concluded that the plans met the requirements. In fact, the slope of the cliff at that point is deceptive and there is considerable distance between the water’s edge and the as drawn/laid out foundations. There is no undercut in the cliff at that point.

    I hope this helps to keep the discussion moving in an appropriate direction. I have no connection with this project – just an interest because it affects my neighbourhood.

  13. anonlymouse

    What about the ability to have a public thoroughfare along the cliff top? Will this be extinuished?

  14. Chris Peachment

    anonlymouse asks:
    What about the ability to have a public thoroughfare along the cliff top? Will this be extinguished?

    —-
    The “cliff ” at that point is sloped and covered in scrub. It has not been used as a public thoroughfare in the past 10 or more years. That said, the strip of walkable land is narrow even before building anything on it, so yes, the “ability to have a public thoroughfare along the cliff top” will be extinguished in that area. In their defense, the developers have made wide concrete walks on both sides of the road.

    This construction repeats what happened years ago and 20 metres further along the road where private lots include houses on the sea side of the road.

    The lack of public policy/law on maintaining the sea side of roads for public use puts us at the mercy of private owners. I know one owner who intends to leave the sea side of a nearby property undeveloped because of a belief that it is better for the country. There is no obligation to do so.

  15. yatinkiteasy

    Chris Peachment…how is it then that owners of properties all down the Enterprise Coast Rd from the Palisades project as far as Miami Beach, have been denied permission to build ANYTHING on the seaside(or cliffside) portion of their land. The hotel Little Arches was not even allowed to use their own seaside/cliffside plot as a parking lot for the hotel!
    You must be blind if you dont see that COW and Preconco are building right up to the edge of the cliff. There is NOT a distance of 10 meters from the edge of the cliff to the building line. …and dont come with the BS that its some kind of an optical illusion, “because the slope of the cliff is deceptive at that point”….its very clear to see.
    Besides, if you are a builder, you would know that there is another building line that should be complied with..it is taken from the centre of the road, and is 30ft from that point to the start of the building that faces the road. Pace those 30ft out and see where you are left standing!
    Its clearly a violation . But are we not resigned to the fact that Laws are made for some, and not for others?
    Were structural engineers called in to determine if it is safe to have a huge house built on that site? I bet not.
    Also, they have destroyed Mr Gales wall, and have taken over a year to replace it…this poses a serious threat to life when a bus and car arrive at the corner at the same time.They just don`t seem to care.Over a year for some 40 ft of wall!

  16. Chris Peachment

    yatinkiteasy says in quotes:

    “…owners of properties all down the Enterprise Coast Rd from the Palisades project as far as Miami Beach, have been denied permission to build ANYTHING on the seaside(or cliffside) portion of their land. The hotel Little Arches was not even allowed to use their own seaside/cliffside plot as a parking lot for the hotel!”


    I am not privy to such knowledge and I wonder how it is that you have it. Do you have knowledge of the reasons why Little Arches was denied permission?

    “You must be blind if you dont see that COW and Preconco are building right up to the edge of the cliff. There is NOT a distance of 10 meters from the edge of the cliff to the building line. …and dont come with the BS that its some kind of an optical illusion, “because the slope of the cliff is deceptive at that point”….its very clear to see.”


    It seems we have different definitions of “cliff” and the rule used by Coastal Zone Management is “10 metre (10m) setback from the most landward point of cliff undercut for building construction”.

    There is no undercut at this location, so it is the high water edge that is relevant. Please don’t argue for the 30 metre beach setback – this is obviously not a beach situation. Google Earth imagery from 29 April 2006 does not show the construction but it does allow measurement of road centreline to sand at edge of “cliff”. That distance is about 25 metres. Subtract 9.75 metres (32′) for the building line and 10 metres for the CZMU setback leaves 5.25 metres for the building. It appears to me that the work done so far does not extend the full 5.25 metres, but I have not put a tape measure to it.

    “… 30ft from that point to the start of the building…
    Its clearly a violation.”


    I must admit that the entry doorway appears a bit close to the road edge and I wonder how that was justified. 🙂

    “Were structural engineers called in to determine if it is safe to have a huge house built on that site? I bet not.”


    What’s being built on the sea side appears to be a covered patio with shower facilities, not a huge house. Having examined the site and the “cliff” from below while walking on the beach at low tide, I would have no difficulty in recommending such a structure for that location if that is what the client wanted.

    “Also, they have destroyed Mr Gales wall, and have taken over a year to replace it…this poses a serious threat to life when a bus and car arrive at the corner at the same time.They just don`t seem to care.Over a year for some 40 ft of wall!”


    Mr. Gales’ wall was at the road edge and has now been moved back to permit construction of the concrete walk that is now underway. I do not know why the first attempt at foundations was removed – that might explain some of the delay in completing the work.

    There is a pair of flagmen on that corner during the work day to reduce the risk of accidents. I grant you that does not help after hours.

  17. Something(s) Happening

    UPDATE :

    Hon. David Estwick has just seen to it that Mr. Dale Marshall has been arrested for his involvement in the Dodds Prison fiasco.

    More information as it comes to hand.

  18. BFP

    Hello Something(s) Happening.

    If you know that, you know more. Please inform us.

  19. yatinkiteasy

    Chris Peachment….thanks for the enlightenment.

    I`ll now quote you as to how close to the cliff is the structure now being built: …”so yes, the “ability to have a public thoroughfare along the cliff top” will be extinguished in that area” Enough said.

    No mystery about how I know about the Little Arches situation, I know the owners.

    You wrote: “What`s being built on the seaside appears to be a covered patio with shower facilities, not a big house”
    You are right, thats the “clubhouse” for the exclusive use of property owners across the street.

    The Big House I refer to is not the structure now being built, but Anani House, which will be built next to it, again on the cliff…a two story building complete with a small pool, according to the plans on Island Gold`s website.(Also shown on the big billboards at the site.)
    http://www.igrealty.com/developments/palisades.php

    Mr Gales wall…For sure it will be better than it was before…but to take a YEAR to do it is ridiculous. They built 16 complete townhouses in the same timeframe.!

    Who said anything about “a beach situation”..I said they are building right to the edge of the cliff, and I`ll stick to that because I don`t need Google Earth Imagery…I have eyes.

  20. anonlymouse

    There is a beach access going down to Freight’s beach, right beside this building.

    Will this be extinguished?

  21. Chris Peachment

    yatinkiteasy said:

    “Who said anything about “a beach situation”..I said they are building right to the edge of the cliff, and I`ll stick to that because I don`t need Google Earth Imagery…I have eyes.”


    The reference to a beach situation is because the setback requirements are 30 metres from the high water mark for beaches and that is not applicable in this situation.

    The reason for using Google Earth is that it is quite difficult to obtain horizontal distance measurements on any form of sloping surface using ordinary means. Surveyors have the right tools to do the job.

    For the first time last evening, I went behind the “clubhouse”. You are correct, the edge of ground at that point is well defined.

    I used a tape to measure, as best I could, the distance between the seaward face of the building (not the patio) and the drop off. It is in the region of 10 metres but is a bit hard to judge without falling off 🙂

    I also measured the road side which I found to be about 7.5 metres from road centreline to face of building. According to Town and Country Development Planning Office guidelines, that distance should be 9.75 metres.

    Anyone want to enquire with the developer or T&CDPO about the reasons for this discrepancy?

  22. yatinkiteasy

    Chris Peachment…I`m glad we agree on some things at least

  23. Crusoe

    Anyone looking to develop land right now, in this economic situation, must have a few screws loose.

  24. Nostradamus

    Crusoe, in this instance it’s probably not about developing now but the all important approval of your application to develop a protected area.

    Once you have that permission in hand the value of your land skyrockets and you can on sell to another developer.

  25. JustInterested

    Glad to see ordinary citizens getting involved and becoming more aware of what government and private corporations are doing. Get active, speak up, spread the word and do what’s right, not what’s most profitable. An excellent video on youtube is called “Invisible Empire.” It’s in several parts and shows how power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. See it by going to youtube dot com and entering “Invisible Empire.” Power to the people and all the best to those who seek peace and justice.

  26. Pingback: The theft of two Barbados National Parks by friends of government. « Barbados Free Press

  27. Pingback: Call for civil disobedience to stop Cove Bay Development | Barbados Free Press

  28. Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Are you kidding me. YOu call this a victory. Where were the same protesters when the concrete started turning the West Coast into a jungle. Why the heck you same people doan fight light & Power against their rediculous bills. Or better yet let us get some serious picketting against the exploitation of food and clothing prices from ruthles profit hungry merchants who continue to suck black stupid ass bajans out of their pocket change. But you know why this was stop: look at the names that got involve. Now ask those same names to get involve against the mention exploiters stated earlier and see if they would do the same.

  29. Prince of Barbados

    BFP, it was me that PROUDLY sent you the email…so yes you have permission to use my name. Hearing this news brought me great joy and it has made my heart content and although I do understand where Sunshine Sunny Shine is coming from, he/she has to understand that any green space that is saved by our people in our Beautiful island from the greedy hands of developers is truly something to be proud of. This just shows you that is not too late to save Barbados!

    Long Live Barbados!

  30. just want to know

    While this abandonment of building these monstrosity is great news; will someone take up the noise that go on continuously. As a family we have been going around to Bathsheba at week-ends, now we cannot go because of the noise level that go on at a house just above. We go there for some peace & quiet, that has now been taken away. No one want to stop people from enjoying themselves, but at night, why, why so much loud noise, that it shakes the bed one is trying to sleep on. So please have your restaurant, and your entertainment, but let others enjoy their peace & quiet. The week-ends are worse, the noise doesn’t stop until early morning .

  31. millertheanunnaki

    @ Sunshine Sunny Shine November 28, 2011 at 7:41 pm
    Correct me if I am wrong! But who were the developers? Wasn’t a man with a suntan selling linen in town in bed with the investors in this project?

  32. Bajan George

    Is there a connection between these two dots?
    A) Withdrawal of the Long Beach project, and
    B) The political intentions of the Abeds?

  33. John

    Barbados Today reports the Silk Cotton Tree at Warrens will be taken down.

    Hope I misread it.