Unfair cartoon? The Truth? A little of both?

See BFP’s article Barbados refuses request to look after injured Haitians. “Even one is too many for our health care system” says Bajan Foreign Minister.

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25 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Haiti

25 responses to “Unfair cartoon? The Truth? A little of both?

  1. Johnny Postle

    You mean 5 or 10 or even 20 Barbados could not help. Chuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuupse.

  2. Hants

    Barbados has one hospital and no money.

    Hello!

  3. Thewhiterabbit

    Greetings Mr. Hants,
    Barbados has two hospitals, and many clinics and polyclinics. The art of compassionate caring and giving involves recognition that no matter how poor we might think ourselves to be, the Haitians are much, much, worse off and desperately in need. We can afford to accommodate our fellow humans. Many of the people needing assistance don’t require hospitalization, merely on-going care. The current stance of the Government of Barbados is shameful, absolutely embarrassingly shameful. Pride? What pride? Industry? Only for our own selfish betterment?

  4. oh come on

    whiterabbit do you live in barbados and do you even attend polyclinic or even go to the qeh for medical care? i honestly believe the ppl who are ridiculing the government at its decision only visit private doctors like sandy crest etc.

    thing is barbados (and barbadians) are helping in other ways and are still being chastised.

    this is what is shameful and embarassing.

  5. oh come on

    and where is this other hospital you speak of?

  6. reality check

    This story just about affects everyone in the world directly or indirectly. A friends Uncle just died yesterday from lack of antibiotics and medcial attention. He left three young children behind.

    White Rabbit hit the nail on the head.

    There are many Barbadians who still have a soul left but their leadership truly lacks any.

    We have been tested and found wanting.

    http://www.kltv.com/global/story.asp?s=9849830

  7. Hants

    @Thewhiterabbit

    Where is the second Hospital in Barbados?

    Have you ever been to the QEH ?

    Have you ever had a relative die in the QEH ?

    Both my mother and father died in the QEH because of the limitations within that hospital.
    Good doctors,good nurses but lack of equipment and facilities.

    My fellow Bajans and Canadians, keep donating money to help Haiti.

  8. TheNickster

    Wasn’t some white guy offering to build a new hospital and our wise government declined? The glaring mismanagement of the QEH is apparent to any Bajan who has ever been there, the quake just made it harder to hide.

  9. Sad

    That is a really sad situation – it is a duty to help in the midst of such a large scale disaster – and an honour. How lucky is any country with as much to offer as Barbados. The USA (who are always there to help) asked Barbados for assistance in helping Haiti – how could Barbados refuse? How would Barbados feel if help was refused to their people in a similar situation?

    All countries helping Haiti (without exception) have great financial needs at home. Aren’t you glad that is not stopping them from helping Haiti? They would also help Barbados in the event of a natural disaster.

    I am shocked at the lack of compassion I am reading in some of these posts.

  10. Hundreds of Millions of Dollars

    Hundreds of Millions of Dollars guaranteed and made available by two Barbados governments for 4 Seasons, Clico, Barbados Turf Club, Cricket World Cup, Community councils and so many projects where the money was thrown down the drain. $400,000 beach washroom etc etc etc etc.

    Not one Haitian family welcome in Barbados tho. We could look after ten patients and their families easily. We are a country and compared to Haiti we are wealthy. You think a injured Haitian would care about waiting in the corridor at the QEH? Read the other BFP story about the nurse in Haiti and people coming to her clinic to die.

    People are going to die in Haiti because Barbados would not welcome any injured to our shores.

  11. oh come on

    isnt barbados helping in other ways? the way you all make it seem is as tho we are doing NOTHING.

  12. American Girl

    Yes, I’m sure Barbados is doing a lot for the people of Haiti, in the way of pledges of millions of dollars, and possibly food stuffs, water, and clothes. BUT, is it not obvious that the most immediate need is for medical attention? Inviting someone into your home is the essence of humanity.

  13. 300,000+

    That’s the number of people already on this island at any given time.
    Mine Yours and Ours, Bajans, Guyanese and Tourisses combined.

    We don’t need nor want any Haitians here,sorry.
    No Nigerians,neither, thanks very much for the kind offer.

    Our QEH is already overstressed and overworked.
    I go there regularly for free services, and it’s not great.
    OK -but not great. Lots of waiting(mainly for Notes to be found)
    QEH needs NO extra workload -in fact it could use a lot less, particularly in the Eye Dept.

    Help Haiti is other ways: there are LOTS of other ways. Send $$$, Send food aid, send Bajans(we got plenty of them to spare a few dozen,well!) -but no Haitians coming here. We got QUITE ENOUGH GUYANESE already!!
    -jes in case u en notice.

  14. dismanhey

    @300,000 +

    As you may prefer not to acknowledge, we had Nigerian nurses (whom we digraced and sent home) and do currently have Guyanese doctors at the QEH. The last minister of health was so adamant on Bajan nurses early in his tenure, to reach at this stage where the nursing association( or some related body) is admitting that many of our people can’t qualify. He and his prime minister couldn’t even agree publicly on whether we would get a new hospital.
    Yes, you and your comrades keep watching the immigration issue whilst everything else crumbles.

  15. Scrupie

    If people from next door who worked in Barbados and contributed to our economy are unwelcome and some sent packing, what de hell ya all expect?

  16. Duppy Lizard

    Anyone interested in an African perspective on the earthquake in Haiti and the assistance given by European countries should visit the Sunday Standard of Botswana. You will have to go into the archives and select the date of January 24, 2010. The article is titled “Haiti and the blacks” by Loose Canon – it speaks volumes.

    If I knew how to cut and paste the article I would have done so – perhaps someone else could. How about you BFP?

  17. Checkit-Out

    Hi Duppy Lizard

    Here is the cut and pasted article. (Not that I agree with everything in it)

    Haiti and the blacks!
    by Loose Canon
    24.01.2010 4:23:39 P

    I hope black people will learn a lesson from the earthquake that hit Haiti.
    If they don’t learn anything from it, then I throw up my hands in despair and give up.

    Let’s start with a few basic facts.
    Until the earthquake, I never knew there was a place called Haiti. I was taught geography at school but I cannot remember a time when the mistress told us about Haiti. It must have been one of those insignificant countries that we had no reason to know about.

    I was fairly good at geography because I knew which country was on which continent. I also knew many capital cities. But as for Haiti I was clueless.

    Now the whole world, including myself, knows about Haiti. I heard news of the earthquake on the radio. I wondered where Haiti was and what sort of people lived there.

    Finally, when I switched on the television, I was informed that Haiti is an island out in the Caribbean. Television pictures revealed a place populated by black people.

    From the non-stop television coverage of the earthquake, I got to learn about the history of Haiti. It was not a good history lesson. It would seem throughout its existence Haiti has suffered a series of natural calamities. In the process it has sunk even deeper into poverty and deprivation.

    Like all places populated by black people, Haiti is poor. As I watched the television images, I felt very sorry for that forsaken place. Then I was hit by a thunderbolt.
    I wondered what if there were no white people. You see, when the earthquake hit Haiti somebody had to come to its assistance. There had to be a rescue effort. The Haitians who survived of course did their fair bit by digging out their families from the collapsed ramshackle buildings.

    But such was the scale of the devastation and the loss of human life that a bigger effort was needed. For that sort of work, you need heavy lifting gear and other sophisticated rescue equipment. I have been following the story of the earthquake keenly. I can attest to the fact that the first people to arrive with sniffer dogs were white crews from all over the world.

    The aero planes that set off carrying water and food were from white countries. Not only that, the teams of volunteer doctors that I saw on television comprised white people from across the world. As the sniffer dogs went into action, the organized rescue teams that carried the stretchers were made up of white people.

    It was announced that a mobile hospital was on the way. It was coming from a white country. For all intents and purposes in the aftermath of the earthquake, Haiti was literally swarming with white people. They had all arrived to save the poor blacks. And the locals were so happy to see them. Granted there were teams from the Orient such as the Chinese and Japanese. They too had quickly left their homes and families to go and assist the stricken people of Haiti.
    It is obvious to everyone that this was a devastating earthquake and the work to repair Haiti and return it to a modicum of normalcy will take many years. Somebody had to commit funds to this effort. Most of the countries that have committed funds to aid the recovery are white. In fact, it would seem the whites are running the show in Haiti.

    What is my point?

    My point is that ever since Haiti was hit by the earthquake I have not seen any of my folks from Africa. Unless the television cameras deliberately ignored them, I never saw a rescue team from my motherland. Nor did I see any sniffer dogs from down here.
    Heck, I never saw a single traditional doctor busy divining where to find people buried under the rubble.

    Haiti is a land of black people. I would have expected the place to be swarming with black people helping their own. They were nowhere to be seen. I never saw any ships from black countries pulling into the harbour.

    As the air traffic circled above the small airport, none of the planes was reported as coming from Africa. The blacks were nowhere to be found. They issued tepid statements of condolence to the people of Haiti and a few of the African countries donated small amounts of cash.

    Granted that was better than nothing. But I must say I was disappointed. I was sad because the blacks did not behave as I had expected. You see, for far too long black countries have been insolent to the point of being abusive. They have a tendency of insulting the white man and telling him to keep out of their countries. In Fact, black people have the temerity to tell white people they can perfectly survive on their own.
    So I had expected the black countries to be consistent and behave true to form. Why didn’t black countries tell white countries to stay away from Haiti because we were quite capable of leading the rescue effort? We should have insulted them as we often do at international forums.

    There, our countries insult white countries and accuse them of imperialism and neo colonialism. I was extremely disappointed when our countries failed to accuse white people of practicing imperialism and neo colonialism by coming to rescue the blacks of Haiti.

    We should have told them we have better sniffer dogs that have been taught only to rescue black people. We should have told their ships to stay away and their planes not to overfly Haiti because we were up to the job with our own ships and aeroplanes.

    We should have brought in our traditional food instead of the strange rations the Haitians are not accustomed to.

    I am so disappointed by the black leaders that I hope never to hear them again bleating about how bad white people are. The earthquake in Haiti was the most opportune time to show the whites, once and for all, that we don’t need them.

    From now onwards, I want black leaders to shut up and never accuse ever white people of being bad. I am sick and tired of big words such as imperialism and neo colonialism which are unable to rescue victims of the earthquake.

    I hope this is not the last earthquake that hits a black country. I want the next one to specifically hit the residence of Old Man in Harare. Then we will see if he will abuse the white crew coming to rescue him and Pretty Face!

  18. Bad Man Saying Nuttin

    Check it out you must be an idiot.
    How many Black developed countries are there? None

    How many countries in the western hemisphere have the capabilities of the developed (white) countries?

    don’t get into black and white , focus on developed and developing. Which developing country, with the exception of Cuba who were denied, has the resources to establish and operate a field hospital? or provide medical ships or airlift capabilities?

    Barbados is one the greatest successes as a developing country yet we can barely operate 2 old airplanes donated by the US and a handful of small ships.

    While I am ever grateful for the assistance provided I cannot forget that these developed countries accumulated their wealth and resources by pillaging third world countries and exploiting other races and sometimes their own.

    To whom much is given much is expected.

  19. Checkit-Out

    Hi Bad man sayin nutten

    Read the introduction to the article and Duppy Lizard’s request for someone to cut and paste it and post it on his behalf. I was only responding to Duppy Lizard.

    However, I think the article is worthy of being dissected and discussed fully as it says volumes of the attitudes of the African who wrote it and his lack of information on America and the Caribbean.

    America has done a huge amount for Haiti in the aftermath of the tragedy and much of it has come from ordinary citizens who genuinely provided their assistance without any expectation of returns. But one must ask if a large part of the assistance we saw was not in its own interest and self serving.

    It needed stories for its TV viewing public: It needed to offset its image of being foremost a war faring nation; Its politicians needed to show that the new Government was more empathetic with Black communities than the former one (remember Katrina). It needed to set up opportunities for its corporations to profit in the near future from developmental opportunities that would arise from the rebuilding of haiti. Indeed, profiteering from rebuilding countries that it has destroyed in its wars is one of the most important consequences of its many wars. Just look what is happening in Iraq and Afghanistan, etc. with the contracts for all sorts of developments in those war-torn countries.

    Perhaps a true measure of the degree with which ordinary Americans empathized with Haiti was the result of the Telethon that was jointly held on CNN and a number of other Cable agencies eliciting donations from ordinary Americans. I think they raised just about 1 million US dollars. Compare this with the VOB telethon which raised more than 1/2 million US from a population base that was perhaps 1/100 of the American population.

    I think there are a number of valid reasons, besides ready access to relevant resources and proximity to Haiti, that would explain why Loose Canon would not have seen a lot of African nations involved in the immediate recovery effort. He would not have known that the Americans took over the airport and were apparently cherry picking who it would allow in.

    A lot more can be said. But read the full contribution next time before you attack.

  20. Duppy Lizard

    @ Check it out – Thanks for the cut and paste. Like you I don’t agree with everything either, however, it is in my opinion an interesting perspective and comment.

    @ Bad Man Saying Nuttin – I think it’s you who is the idiot! Why would you criticize Check it out? He did not write the article.
    Man’s exploitation of his fellow man is the norm, it’s not limited to a black and white thing. Even you I can guarantee are guilty. Not on the scale of exploiting Africans 500 years ago, but most of us are greedy and will stop at nothing to acheive power and wealth.

    We do seem to be getting more cognizant of the bad things we do and the outpouring of sympathy and support to the Haitians is heartening. Let’s hope that the millions of dollars being donated will be spent wisely and alleviate their suffering – they are a wonderful gentle people.

  21. Checkit-Out

    BFP; Grateful if you would let me know why you are holding my post for moderation to guide me and perhaps others in the future.

  22. BFP

    Hi Checkit-Out

    Your comment is just released from the spam filter.

    I was at work until too late and when the computer filter grabbed your comment (who knows why?) I wasn’t home in time to release it and George was already off for the evening. Sorry I was late for my shift.

    Robert

  23. 5

    Hello Robert ( of BFP)

    I hope you were not late to hear our esteemed PM inform Barbadians ( during his press conference )that ITAL legislation will be here before year end.

    But he also cautioned that we have to be patient and careful with this process.

    I remain proud of him and his dynamic team.

    BFP, YOU SHOULD BE TOO !

  24. Thewhiterabbit

    On the off-chance that anybody is yet following this thread, Bermuda today announced that they would take Haitians in need of medical attention. Man, don’t we look good now!?!?!

  25. oh come on

    white rabbit explain how it makes us look bad?

    if their is reason to believe it wont be in our best interest to do it, why would you still want to chastise the government for not doing it?

    bermuda has 2 government ran hospitals btw and as a british colony most likely has british backing on the move.