From The Mouth Of A Child “Previously, I lived in Barbados… so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.”

“Previously, I lived in Barbados, where 96 percent of the population is black and the minority is white, and because I am white, I was judged by my skin color, so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.”

… from Alisha Erozer, second place winner in the Martin Luther King middle school essay contest, Bradenton, Florida

Be Gentle, Friends – Because Alisha Erozer Will Probably Read Your Comments

Dear Alisha,

Each of the staff at Barbados Free Press read your Martin Luther King essay and we congratulate you on winning second place. You have a talent for writing and we hope you continue. We suspect that as you progress in your life, your ability to inspire others with words will become central in whatever you do.

We’re sorry that the time you lived in Barbados was touched by racism, but trust us on this – as a family that has all the colours of the rainbow at the dinner table – we understand. We have two observations that we gently mention because 1/ we don’t want you to take offense, and 2/ we want you to reconsider some of the thoughts we see in your winning essay.

First, we’d like you to reconsider your position that Barack Obama’s election as President is proof that racism has been eliminated and there is now equal opportunity for all in the United States. Yes, things have improved greatly, but all of us have a long way to go before anyone can say the battle is won.

Secondly, we are sorry that some (or many?) of the folks you met on Barbados treated you badly because of your race, but we hope it wasn’t everyone. There are many folks on this island who follow the old ways and are still burdened by hundreds of years of history. We hope you forgive them, and also that you will give Barbados and Bajans another chance when you have the opportunity.

If you want to write to us at Barbados Free Press, we would be happy to publish your letter as another feature article. We wish you all the best.

Yours truly,

Marcus, Shona, Cliverton, Robert, George and Auntie Moses

alisha-erozer-barbados-race

Is Obama’s election a realization of Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was an ardent African-American civil rights leader who deeply longed for a vast change in respect to people of all races. He desired equal rights for all, disregarding race, gender or religion. Dr. King devoted his lifetime, without regard for his own safety, giving sincere effort to put an end to the vile prejudice.

Finally, 40 years after Dr. King’s death, comes the election of Barack Obama as president of our country, which is truly a realization of Dr. King’s dream. It’s a realization of Martin Luther King’s dream because it shows the immense progress we’ve made in recognizing civil rights for everyone; it shows that Americans have been able to see past racial barriers and judge a candidate by character, leadership and beliefs, and it also shows that the election has inspired others to acknowledge that race, gender and religion shouldn’t constrain you from reaching for your dreams.

Yes! I believe, Obama’s election is a realization of Dr. King’s dream because it shows how much progress has been made in the last 50 years. For example, 50 years ago black children went to different schools, lived in different neighborhoods, and drank from different water fountains. Also, people used to think that African-Americans were incapable of completing certain tasks and that they were inferior. Think about it: How crazy is it to judge the intelligence of someone by their skin color? There was even once a law that black people had to give up their bus seats if white people wanted the spot in which they were sitting.

Now, all Americans are given equal opportunities and equal rights. Americans have effectively enforced the idea that all men are created equal. Obama’s election confirms that attitudes have changed to consider black people as intelligent, capable and equal.

In addition, Obama’s election is a realization of Dr. King’s dream because it displays how remarkable it is that many Americans have been able to put race aside and judge a candidate by character, leadership and beliefs.

Previously, I lived in Barbados, where 96 percent of the population is black and the minority is white, and because I am white, I was judged by my skin color, so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.

In Dr. King’s famous “I Have A Dream” speech, he states he dreams that his four little children will one day live in a nation where they won’t be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character…

… continue reading Alisha’s second place Martin Luther King essay at the Bradenton Herald Is Obama’s election a realization of Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream?

Advertisements

58 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues, Ethics, Human Rights, Immigration, Race, Tourism, Travel, Traveling and Tourism

58 responses to “From The Mouth Of A Child “Previously, I lived in Barbados… so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.”

  1. cq8

    Alisha’s sentence about prejudice in Barbados is so matter-of-fact with no obvious malice towards Bajans. The simplicity of her statement makes it doubly devastating.

  2. Stressed Out

    I agree I think that she just threw it in for effect IMO.

  3. Lady Anon

    In reading the same comments, Alisha’s sentiment is made based on her exposure and she is not incorrect. Unfortunately, her statement can be a double-edged sword.

    “I was judged by my skin color, so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.”

    In the context/culture in which her essay was written, it could be perceived that her experience was a negative one. The word “prejudice” in and of itself has a negative connotation.

    But let’s look at this. At a hotel where white people are treated differently (translate better) than black people, white people are being judged by the colour of their skin, so she is quite right.

    In a jewelry store, where a black person is treated as though he/she cannot afford what is in the store vs the white person who is brought coffee and snacks; then Alisha is quite right.

    However, Alisha’s experience could be different. She may have had people bending over backwards to assist her, while she saw other persons treated differently, and the only OBVIOUS difference was that their skin colour was different.

    Just my two cents.

  4. 199

    Alisha, I am a BLACK Barbadian who lives in the UK where 96% of the population are white and 4% black, or near as much! Do you think that I experience racism in the UK, dear??

    My dear, I suspect that you’re very young which is why I’m going to excuse everything which you’ve said and, knowing how sensitive my friends at BFP are, on the subject of race !!

  5. Jason

    Good point Lady Anon!

    I read Alisha’s essay and I took that as she was treated badly too, but it may have been the other way.

    If she reads this BFP article and our comments she might clarify what she meant.

  6. Jason

    HOWEVER she says that she was judged because she was white by people who were prejudiced.

    It seems to be the blacks who were prejudiced against her because she is white.

    Rihanna made similar complaints about the racism of some black bajans.

  7. Red Lake Lassie

    I think the meaning of Alisha’s statement is easy to see and it is that she was a victim of prejudice, not a beneficiary.

  8. 199

    Jason
    January 18, 2009 at 4:30 pm
    Good point Lady Anon!

    I read Alisha’s essay and I took that as she was treated badly too, but it may have been the other way.

    If she reads this BFP article and our comments she might clarify what she meant.

    ******************

    That being the case, is she really as brilliant a writer as BFP gives the impression?!!

  9. True Blue Sue

    Some afro-Barbadians treat the local whites poorly but they are friendly and pleasant to the visiting foreign whites.

  10. Beefcake

    At the end of the day, racism exists everywhere. I haven’t seen any proper surveys done, but I guess that maybe 10% of a population is racist.

    What is interesting is how vocal that 10% is, or how vocal that 10% is allowed to be.

  11. anon

    oh boohoo. i also echo the sentiments of one of the commenters here. i lived in the UK and was treated like less than a dog as a black man in a white man’s country – in 2008!! get real.

  12. 199

    ‘anon’, I know just what you mean as I still, live here and experience the same thing on a daily basis then BFP have the gaul to describe ME, as racist! Living in ‘paradise-Barbados’, they have n’t the foggiest idea of life in the UK and can thus be over-impressed by the writings of some little girl!! As you said, “get real, BFP”!!

  13. Tony Hall

    199 and Anon,
    I agree with you both. BFP better get real. I believe that girl was writing for sensationalism. Where was she treated badly and by whom? Was it at school? She should have been more specific. What does she know about racism?

  14. wondering

    An interesting note on the race issue : In the review of the James Blunt’s concert in the Nation couple days ago, the writer made reference of ” the caucasian audience”. I can’t remember coming across this sort of racial definition with regards to a public event of this sort. Are we going to get ” the negroid audience at a dancehall party”.?
    This is just backwardness and it perpetuates the very negative sterotyping of groups of people, that seems to becoming our favourite pastime

  15. Sad To Say

    “Previously, I lived in Barbados, where 96 percent of the population is black and the minority is white, and because I am white, I was judged by my skin color, so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.”

    BFP has asked us to go easy on Alisha because she is a child, I beg to differ. Here is an article that depicts Bajans (at least 96%) as colour prejudiced. We all know that this is not the case. The VAST MAJORITY of Bajans are not colour prejudiced. As a matter of fact I think that class prejudism predominates when it comes to prejudices here in Barbados.

    Unfortunately a number in the 4% are white who are rich (at least by Bajan standards) and are by default members of the upper class. Therefore when there is prejudice directed at the upper class it often misinterpreted as colour rather than class prejudism.

    Questions for Alisha:
    1. Where did you go to school while you lived in Barbados? I am sure it was a private school where you are very unlikely to run into colour or class prejudism?
    2. How old were you while you left in Barbados. How could you have appreciated or understand prejudism at such at tender age?
    3. Is the above quote a TRUE reflection of your or someone elses feelings?
    4. Give us specific examples of the types of prejudism you would have been subjected to at your tender age?

    Alisha BFP said you would be reading this Blog therefore I expect you to validate your comments.

  16. I can agree whole-heartedly with Alisha, I am considered white here even though I know I am more mixed than concrete.

    QED (Quod Erat Demonstrandum: That which is proven) – Twice while working at Starcom when it was Rediffusion and many other times by other folks since, I have had both Stetson Babb and Dale Miller say I am only pretending to be broke or poor because I am a white Bajan and that AUTOMATICALLY means I have money, even if I don’t have cash they reason, then I have access thereof….

    Pure crud, and y’all get vex at a young teen’s comments on what REALLY happens here, STILL?

    Name the last time you see white folk on the cover of the phonebook? How many jokes have been made since Brendan Nash joined the WI squad in cricket? Or even reference made to the fact it’s the 1st time a white man has been on the team since 19-whatever? As Dr. Phil says – GET REAL!

  17. BFP, please release my comment defending Alisha?

  18. PiedPiper

    First of all, there is no such word as “prejudism”, the word is prejudice and it most certainly does exist in Barbados. I’m surprised at the number of you who claim otherwise. To be white in a predominantly black country does not go unoticed and there are certain assumptions made about you because you are white. Bajans are even colour prejudiced amongst there own black ranks. Do not bother denying the fact that lighter skinned blacks look down on those who are very dark or at the very least thank their lucky stars that they are not so dark. It is a well known fact that black people of lighter complection seem to move up the ladder both socially and financially more readily.
    Lastly, this young girl appears to be about 12-13 years of age and has not used the word “racism” in her depiction of her years spent living in Barbados. The only word she has used is “judged” which I think is a very accurate word and has been used in it’s proper context.

  19. Hants

    A knowledge of Bajan history and basic common sense would hell you all to understand race relations in Barbados.

    White slave owners. Black slaves.
    White plantation and Business owners Black workers.
    White only yacht club and white only cricket clubs.
    White bank tellers black maids.

    We have come a long way today but the “culture” of the past is embedded in our collective psyche.

    Barbadians have learnt to “tolerate” each other without “integrating”.

  20. Village Ghetto Land

    Well done child, to learn that racism exists is hard for a young person- it just isn’t rational, is it?

    Many people, in what they think is their own special type of wisdom, try to justify their own racism by saying it is a reaction to their treatment by others. Or what they perceive to have been their treatment. Now you know.

    Always meet the gaze of those in front of us; look them squarely in the face; try to understand what they are saying; and then in your day-to-day remember to treat everyone with kindness and respect, even if they do not reciprocate.

    That is the way to aproach life as a minority or a majority in any given society.

    It’s a hard lesson, that there are racists in the world. We can’t change them no matter how hard we try, and they will always be there.

    We can only work in our small quarters of our worlds, and make our friends’ lives better by being special people and by doing special works. Live clean, let your works be seen (that’s a quote from an old song).

    Child, you are well and correct. Go forth in peace and seek knowledge.

  21. marvinbareback

    Interesting subject matter because ignorance exists on both sides of the racial divide. Now we have a half-black,half-white man coming to power as President of the USA. Alisha thinks the prejudice will be (or is) gone when a white country elects a black man. The better measure for absence of racism will be when a black country elects a white man (or at least half-white) to be their leader.

  22. Edward

    To marvinbareback, are you blind… The president of Barbados is at least half white if not more!

  23. Well said Hants, well said Pied Piper and VGL.

    The historical structuring of Barbados does have an impact in the creation of our nation as it exists today.

    Nevertheless, it is those who hold onto the past who cannot move forward, rather than those who come with a fresh outlook and seek a new path.

    Remnant structures do exist. Remnant behaviours do exist.

    Edward, did not another politican on the now Opposition refer to the PM’s racial origin sometime before the election? Maybe I am wrong, but I thought so. If I am correct, that would be an example of the extent of the matter.

    Remember the much discussed statements by Liz Thompson et al.

    Do you not think that had something to do with the now Opposition losing the Government i.e. their outlook as evidenced by their ‘unusual’ statements from time to time?

  24. J

    Dear Ian:

    Get over yourself.

    I doubt very much that anybody in Barbados considers you to be white.

  25. PiedPiper

    Well said Sir Dick. It is discouraging though that those who have had the best of educations and risen to the ranks of top politicians in Barbados, play the race card, i.e. Liz Thompson, Mia Mottley and yes, that person who did in fact make remarks about PM Thompson’s racial make up. They pander to those “remnant behaviors” in order to win votes. It does nothing to help the country move forward.

  26. J

    Noticing that someone is black or white is racist. Just as it is not sexist to notice that someone is female or male.

    It is however racist to treat someone badly because they are white or black; just as it is sexist to treat someone badly because they are male or female; and ageist to treat someone badly because they are a child or an elder.

    Fairly frequently I have to meet strangers at the airport and I always ask them to describe themselves and invaribly they will mention, their gender, age, color, weight and height.

    If you doubt me try describing yourself to a complete stranger without mentioning your age, color, gender, height, weight etc.

    These things are simply descriptors and none of them are derogotory.

  27. J

    Please add NOT to the first sentence

  28. J

    Dear Ian:

    If the population of Barbados is 4% white and the phone book is published once per year, I would expect to see white people on the cover 4 times in every hundred years.

    I haven’t checked but it is very likely that white people have appeared on the Barbadostelephone directory cover at some point in the last 100 years.

  29. J

    marvinbareback wrote

    “The better measure for absence of racism will be when a black country elects a white man (or at least half-white) to be their leader.”

    So what would you call Barbados’ David Thompson?

    And we did not even make a fuss of his election, because you know what? it is so ordinary.

  30. I

    J stated “I doubt very much that anybody in Barbados considers you to be white”. Actually, in connection with that particular person I would have said, “I doubt very much that anybody in Barbados considers you.” Period.

  31. Sad To Say

    I – You have hit the nail on the head. IB (not referring to the Idiot Box – i.e. TV) must notice by now that EVERYONE runs from him – CARIB, and the other places that he hangs out.

  32. PiedPiper

    Wow :-). First time I have ever had a post of mine removed. BFP: Don’t you think you are taking your aversion to certain words (even when they have been astericked out) a little too seriously? Just in case the subtlety of my post escaped you, I was attempting to tell Ian Bourne that the Anon who comes in almost daily to criticize, insult and harrass him is a “Tick” and as it happens a “Tick” that comes from BFPE.
    I find it interesting BFP that you would censor my post, yet you do nothing about these idiots who do not even debate or post comments on the topic at hand but instead come in to insult and disrupt people who have a genuine interest in supporting YOUR blog.

  33. ru4real

    marvinbareback
    January 19, 2009 at 5:05 pm

    Interesting subject matter because ignorance exists on both sides of the racial divide. Now we have a half-black,half-white man coming to power as President of the USA. Alisha thinks the prejudice will be (or is) gone when a white country elects a black man. The better measure for absence of racism will be when a black country elects a white man (or at least half-white) to be their leader.
    ———————
    Are you living in a cave?
    What about our own English born PM?

  34. Tony Hall

    “To marvinbareback, are you blind… The president of Barbados is at least half white if not more!”

    Edward,
    Are you Bajan? If you are not I forgive you but who is the President of Barbados? If you are going to write on the blog think before you do.

  35. Analyzer

    Barack Obama becoming President of the USA will only begin to obliterate racism. I think some people still have a long way to go (on both sides).
    But it is a good start.
    What a spectacular time we live in to witness the beginning of racial harmony.
    Congratulations to the USA and President Obama.
    Many people in the world have high hopes for you and keep you in our prayers.

  36. The Scout

    Analyzer
    President Obama would only start the promised ball rolling in his EIGHT short years in office. The world would look up to us blacks in a different light now. I believe there are some greater than President Obama coming who would take the baton and run with it. I see a lot of light at the end of the tunnel for the offspring of blacks who see the sky as their limit. Blacks MUST support Blacks is this is to be achieved. We cannot always be right but we must be genuine and honest and humble enough to accept criticism

  37. J. Payne

    People are people. Never put your entire trust in mankind it will always eventually let you down. In places where there’s no major ethnic division then people fight over class, or culture, or wealth, or religion people always find have something to treat one another bad. I guess if you could find somewhere that doesn’t that would be the capital of Utopia.

  38. J. Payne

    @ Analyzer

    “President Obama would only start the promised ball rolling in his EIGHT short years in office. The world would look up to us blacks in a different light now.”

    I’m praying for Obama’s success and safety but seriously do you know how many death threats poor Obama is getting??? Just last night they had a next guy on the news the police uncovered his plot… ge planned to walk out in the neighbourhood and start killing Jews, blacks, hispanics, any “non-whites”.


    http://jewishbreakingnews.wordpress.com/2009/01/23/prosecutor-brockton-suspect-planned-%E2%80%98mass-murder%E2%80%99-slaughter-%E2%80%9Cas-many-jews-and-blacks-and-hispanics-as-he-could%E2%80%9D/

    Brockton shooting suspect told police he targeted blacks, Jews, Hispanics
    http://www.dailynewstribune.com/state/x1992968099/Brockton-shooting-suspect-told-police-he-targeted-blacks-Jews-Hispanics

    Since Obama got in these groups are madder than ever, far more vengeful and they are all over the place. I kinda hope he keeps the wire-tapping thing because I think mainly only the wicked have stuff to hide.

  39. J. Payne

    To: Alisha Erozer

    Congratulations on your accomplishment. I wonder if I could ask a question of you. In seconding Sad To Say:

    What were some of the situations in Barbados that you experienced?

    Do you believe the person(s) that fed into the situation were aware that they were coming off to you as being prejudice or racist?

    Sorry to hear you had such a hard time during your time in Bim. Barbados brings happiness to thousands so I would hope that if you visit again you had a more positive experience.

  40. Analyzer

    To: anon

    You said that you were treated less than a dog in the UK. Can you elaborate on what you experienced? Are you sure it was not just upper-crust snobbery? Because some of the upper-crust do snob other whites as well, not just blacks. They can also snob other upper-crust whites too.

  41. Mathilde

    The girl *please note the word GIRL, yes 199 and Anon, this is CHILD you are frothing at the mouth over* did not say anything sensational or even untrue, it was a mere blip in her general message, her words were extremely MILD.
    So what if she has experienced racism? are non-blacks not allowed to admit such a thing? are blacks the ONLY people in the world who get treated differently? we must come from different planets then. Really, get over yourselves. Why are you still in the UK if its THAT bad there? Come here to “Paradise Barbados” as you put it. But don’t get your hopes up, Im sure we can find something else to pick on you for. You’re probably ugly in addition to be stupid and whiney. Oh and poor, and probably Muslim or even the wrong kind of Christian. Your mother was Guyanese. Your car is old. And your accent is dumb. Yes, we’re very good at picking a MILLION different reasons for not liking you. But so is the rest of the world, so you are $#it out of luck there.
    Now, the girl is naive for sure, but thats kind of normal at that age. But who will deny that the fact that the people of the USA voting so strongly for Obama doesn’t send out some kind of message of hope, that that TYPE of racism really is fading? Of course after that they still have a bunch of other kinds of racisms to eradicate. We all have a looong ways to go, because racism is so multi-faceted that to eradicate it completely would require change of a biological nature (I think our brains are almost hard-wired for it) because everywhere in the world people hate other people for perceived differences, Chinese hate Japanese, French hate everybody and visa versa, Scots hate English who hate Irish, a lovely chunk of Africa is torn up in war because of racism, sometimes not even of a physical nature, but physiological i.e. different tribes.
    So really, who are you to get so jumped up over someone else experiencing this universal phenomenon?? You yourself have made a fine display of it.
    Im sorry if this comes off harsh, but racist people complaining of racism really tick me off.

  42. LOL

    1)Anyone who think racism/prejudice (both ways) due to race doesnt exist in Barbados needs to crawl out from whatever gulley they living in. I do not think (sadly) that there is any sensationalism in this child’s essay.

    2) Isn’t it funny that we are thanking our lucky stars that a black man (Mr. Barrack Obama) can be president in the US, but in Barbados we are surprised a half-white made it to be PM? Woulda thought they are both mutli racial…but whatever you call it. Who cares, it is not even criteria on my list when voting.

    3) Are there really white bank tellers in Barbados? Where? I thought all the “white” women in Barbados were secretaries or clerks, or am I getting my sexist wires crossed?

    GET THE HECK OVER IT. IN BIM THERE IS PLENTY OF BOTH RACISM AND SEXIM. HIDING IT DOES NOT HELP ANYTHING.

  43. J

    LOL wrote “but in Barbados we are surprised a half-white made it to be PM?”

    Dear LOL:

    Who exactly in Barbados is surprised that a half-white made it to be PM?

  44. Hants

    Barbadians have learnt to “tolerate” each other without “integrating”.

    I have come to the conclusion that Bajans can’t be bothered with the effort to have meaningful relationships with people across the racial divide in Barbados.

    But we coexist for the most part peacefully. No harm, no foul.

    River Bay……… Cattlewash.

    Peace.

    See page 10 of today’s Advocate.

  45. so it is....

    Maybe older people in Barbados do not integrate but that is not true of the youth.

  46. so it is....

    FOR THE MOST PART.

  47. Does Barbados have a problem with colourism as well?
    I admit this is a bit different from what is expected, but maybe there are unseen tensions?

    Another point:

    Many non-White Bajans may never interact with a White one. So how can they know how many of them feel in this area?

  48. Analyzer

    so it is

    You are quite right, times are changing.
    Some of the older folks are going through a transition period with their grandchildren or children dating outside their race. A lot of the youth today do not see colour as an issue.

  49. 179

    The child is perfectly correct. Where it may be debated whether the colour of her skin resulted in negative or positive treatment, the fact of the matter that Barbadians who are white or even mixed and are perceived to be “white” are usually targets of a colonially based vengeance. No one chooses his or her race and no one should be persecuted for it based on the actions of who happened to be his or her ancestors in colonial times. It’s interesting to note that while being referred to as a “white boy” in Trinidad it’s more often than not a description, whereas in Barbados it is flung at persons as a weapon, intended to cut and shame. Sadly, Barbadian society as I foresee shall remain hung up on what is the most arbitrary of traits-race-for a very long time to come. As a Barbadian of mixed heritage I am sad to say that I fear my children too will be subject to an ungrounded hateful attitude from the some of the general black population on account of their skin colour and seek a life for myself outside of Barbados.

  50. J

    Anon wrote:

    “It’s interesting to note that while being referred to as a “white boy” in Trinidad it’s more often than not a description, whereas in Barbados it is flung at persons as a weapon, intended to cut and shame. ”

    So pray tell me when last a “white boy” been “cut” in Barbados or had a “weapon” used against him?

  51. The Scout

    I,m beginning to see young people mixing more over the last 5 years or so. There have even been a few black/white bajan couples who have mattier recently. I think the young children are breaking down this barrier from their associations at school.

  52. Dutch maiden

    Ain’t that the truth! Hants made a very good point. Being a female (I am mulatto with darker skin and less textured hair) who’s early life experiences with white non-barbadians was extremely good, i automatically assumed that there was in fact no racism in barbados. During primary school i had limited exposure to white, the few experiences i did have were quite normal and didn’t strike me as being affected by race or class.

    However, by the time i reached 5th form in secondary school i could clearly see the difference. I was really open minded going into secondary school, willing to make freinds with any and everyone. My experiences with whites during this time i would say is what changed my mind about racism existing in barbados.

    During those years i met some mixed raced people who could pass for white and then some whites. From being alongside but not with i realised alot of about people. Many of the mixed race students opted to befriend the whites rather than the balcks, and while they would talk to you it was clear to see that it wasn’t acceptance but more so tolerance.

    However after five years spent at two tertiary institutions my views changed yet again. I would say bajan whitestend to stick to their own, this i have no problem with. What i do have a problem with is that when they do befriend blacks, rather well off blakcs or those who are of the working class, the blacks somehow start to believe that they are better than other blacks and even some working class whites.

    It is in this that i have not only seen racism, but all types of prejudice. I have encountered some black girls who i would describe as being “more white than the queen mother”. This is due to the behaviour of the blacks who have somewhat succesfully integrated with the whites on the island. Although the whites may only display tolerance at times their tolerance is easier to understand than the blatant racims depicted by blacks who are amoung the few accepted.

    So once more to clearify i can’t judge what the little girl said, because she to may have been openminded but become disillusioned by the seeming prejudice she experienced here.

    Racism is alive,not dead……and the worst case of racism there is in this world today is that which comes from those who long to be white, or black as the case maybe and therefore act racist or prejudice to their own race to feel better about themselves. I know this first hand by the types of comments i have recieved from whites, blacks and other mixed race people as to why i “chemically straighten my naturally pretty hair”.

  53. The Scout

    Just a few years ago, i was present at a very rich white non- barbadian’s house, a business client of mine/ business friend. A bajan white man, who thinks much of himself came to the house and I was introduced to him by my client. You should see the look on this man’s face, as though he had seen a ghost. i know I ugly but I didn’t realise it was so obvious. Sometime afterwards, my client told me this man asked him why he was harbouring me at his house. Thank God, the younger generation is looking in a different direction

  54. 179

    In reply to J who wrote:

    “So pray tell me when last a “white boy” been “cut” in Barbados or had a “weapon” used against him?”

    Unfortunately you misread my comment. Whereas in other Caribbean societies to say, “Yeah, them boxes over there is for the white fella to collect” for instance, it is simply a description. In Barbados, to say, “that white girl there” is said generally said with a certain amount of malice. Those non-white Barbadians who have white or whitish friends and acquaintances often refer to them as “fair” or “clear-skin” as the fact of the matter is that “white” is really a malicious description. It is intended to suggest something about a person whom, often, very little is known about by those slinging the label. “White” in Barbados means a variety of things, more often negative than not, including you must have money, you don’t care about the rest of the general population and must be racist on some level or you are ignorant or stupid.

    So in reply to “J”, you misread my comment, and as far as crimes being perpetrated against “whites” or at least those who look white enough, it happens as I can attest to.

    Again, it is sad that racism exists when race is the most arbitrary of factors, no one chooses their ancestry.

  55. Hants

    @ Dutch maiden

    What you have written is the truth as I also see it.

    @ The Scout

    What you experienced is normal in Barbados.

    There are also White bajans who would treat you as their equal. Sadly they are only a few of them.

    I still think the race problem in Barbados is about power.

    Rich White Bajans are afraid of losing their “inheritance” if they marry black.

    It must be said however that so far Barbados is still “peaceful”.

  56. Alisha Erozer

    I am surprised to see how much attention my one little statement has aroused. Dont feel bad at all, my life in Barbados wasn’t bad at all. Im just saying I was judged so in my speech it let everyone know that I knew what I was talking about. Thank you for congratulating me,
    Alisha Erozer

  57. Alisha Erozer

    I just wrote that statement for the affect. I never said I was treated badly, I just simply said I was judged. Please don’t assume that me being judged made Barbados a non-satisfactory experience. Living in Barbados was amazing, and everyday I miss living there

  58. I’m white Scotsman and lived on Barbados for a very happy 10 months, in a predominantly black area, Kingsland. Not many white people around those parts, my wife was also black. I can honestly say that during my whole time on the island that I never encountered any racism or any ill feeling due to the colour of my skin.

    In response to 199, you should come live in Kilburn in London. I’m in the minority again, but who gives a dam. It is the 21st century and racial hatred needs to end.