Daily Archives: January 18, 2009

From The Mouth Of A Child “Previously, I lived in Barbados… so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.”

“Previously, I lived in Barbados, where 96 percent of the population is black and the minority is white, and because I am white, I was judged by my skin color, so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.”

… from Alisha Erozer, second place winner in the Martin Luther King middle school essay contest, Bradenton, Florida

Be Gentle, Friends – Because Alisha Erozer Will Probably Read Your Comments

Dear Alisha,

Each of the staff at Barbados Free Press read your Martin Luther King essay and we congratulate you on winning second place. You have a talent for writing and we hope you continue. We suspect that as you progress in your life, your ability to inspire others with words will become central in whatever you do.

We’re sorry that the time you lived in Barbados was touched by racism, but trust us on this – as a family that has all the colours of the rainbow at the dinner table – we understand. We have two observations that we gently mention because 1/ we don’t want you to take offense, and 2/ we want you to reconsider some of the thoughts we see in your winning essay.

First, we’d like you to reconsider your position that Barack Obama’s election as President is proof that racism has been eliminated and there is now equal opportunity for all in the United States. Yes, things have improved greatly, but all of us have a long way to go before anyone can say the battle is won.

Secondly, we are sorry that some (or many?) of the folks you met on Barbados treated you badly because of your race, but we hope it wasn’t everyone. There are many folks on this island who follow the old ways and are still burdened by hundreds of years of history. We hope you forgive them, and also that you will give Barbados and Bajans another chance when you have the opportunity.

If you want to write to us at Barbados Free Press, we would be happy to publish your letter as another feature article. We wish you all the best.

Yours truly,

Marcus, Shona, Cliverton, Robert, George and Auntie Moses

alisha-erozer-barbados-race

Is Obama’s election a realization of Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was an ardent African-American civil rights leader who deeply longed for a vast change in respect to people of all races. He desired equal rights for all, disregarding race, gender or religion. Dr. King devoted his lifetime, without regard for his own safety, giving sincere effort to put an end to the vile prejudice.

Finally, 40 years after Dr. King’s death, comes the election of Barack Obama as president of our country, which is truly a realization of Dr. King’s dream. It’s a realization of Martin Luther King’s dream because it shows the immense progress we’ve made in recognizing civil rights for everyone; it shows that Americans have been able to see past racial barriers and judge a candidate by character, leadership and beliefs, and it also shows that the election has inspired others to acknowledge that race, gender and religion shouldn’t constrain you from reaching for your dreams.

Yes! I believe, Obama’s election is a realization of Dr. King’s dream because it shows how much progress has been made in the last 50 years. For example, 50 years ago black children went to different schools, lived in different neighborhoods, and drank from different water fountains. Also, people used to think that African-Americans were incapable of completing certain tasks and that they were inferior. Think about it: How crazy is it to judge the intelligence of someone by their skin color? There was even once a law that black people had to give up their bus seats if white people wanted the spot in which they were sitting.

Now, all Americans are given equal opportunities and equal rights. Americans have effectively enforced the idea that all men are created equal. Obama’s election confirms that attitudes have changed to consider black people as intelligent, capable and equal.

In addition, Obama’s election is a realization of Dr. King’s dream because it displays how remarkable it is that many Americans have been able to put race aside and judge a candidate by character, leadership and beliefs.

Previously, I lived in Barbados, where 96 percent of the population is black and the minority is white, and because I am white, I was judged by my skin color, so I know the feeling of being judged by people who are prejudiced.

In Dr. King’s famous “I Have A Dream” speech, he states he dreams that his four little children will one day live in a nation where they won’t be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character…

… continue reading Alisha’s second place Martin Luther King essay at the Bradenton Herald Is Obama’s election a realization of Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream?

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues, Ethics, Human Rights, Immigration, Race, Tourism, Travel, Traveling and Tourism

Michael Winner Slams Sandy Lane Head Chef “Ghastly Grant” MacPherson: “He struts around… His food is unbelieveably awful… inedible rubber…”

"Charming" Sandy Lane waitresses Rehanna and Francia with a furious Michael Winner

Christmas at Sandy Lane: "Charming" Sandy Lane waitresses Rehanna and Francia with a furious Michael Winner

Winner: “Two Excellent Waitresses – Charming, Probably Cook Better Than Head Chef MacPherson Too!”

For us ordinary folk at Barbados Free Press, there’s a pleasing simplicity about a fish cutter and a beer at Oistins, with some salad and rice on the side. Plastic fork, styro plate. Sit by the sea, talk with friends and pass the rum bottle on a Friday afternoon. Work done, watch the light fade and thank God I was born on this island instead of Ohio where I spent some particularly brutal winters not so long ago.

The food is good at Oistins – sometimes wonderful if the pretty girl is there and fine enough if the not-so-pretty one is there too! For the food at Oistins is nothing but fresh and the company is always in good spirits. (Sometimes she’ll let you take her home, the not-so-pretty one, I mean.)

BFP Editorial Meeting, Oistins

BFP Editorial Meeting, Oistins

Pity the poor rich bastards at Sandy Lane who become upset when their BDS$110 duck pancake isn’t fluffy enough. Oh, we’ve all had the odd “soggy and grotesque” bit of food at Oistins, but when you’re with friends a little soggy food doesn’t matter. Or shouldn’t matter.

But if you’re paying BDS $300 a plate at Sandy Land (yikes!) and you have forgotten that the sea and the sky are beautiful, I guess you could get upset over a leathery pancake.

There is nothing wrong with having money, nothing wrong at all…

…unless you’ve forgotten what it is to enjoy life and your friends.

Michael Winner should spend more time walking by the sea at Oistins; eating fish cutters and drinking rum with the wind in his face. It might remind him of what it means to be alive.

Sandy Lane, Barbados

Michael Winner, London Times

My friend Gordon Ramsay famously said, “Michael Winner knows nothing about food.” At last I’ve found someone who knows less about food than me.

Not only less about food, but less about presentation, about how to treat people . . . in fact I’ve met the most awful example of the so-called “hospitality industry” I’ve come across in 70 years of eating in the finest restaurants all over the world. Quite a nonachievement. This man is ridiculous.

Stop. Don’t get overexcited. “Calm down, dear, it’s only a chef.” He’s Grant MacPherson, culinary director and head chef of Sandy Lane, Barbados. His food is unbelievably awful…

… continue reading this article at The London Times (link here)

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Tourism, Travel, Traveling and Tourism