Amelot Oil Barbados, Ltd. About To Get Major Barbados Government Funding & Concessions – How Many Government Members Or Their Families Own Shares?

UPDATED: September 8, 2010

Three years later, we’re still looking for the Integrity Legislation and conflict of interest rules that David Thompson promised to implement within the first 100 days…

Young man, I hear you and your friends are stealing goods. But you don’t even send a dress to my house. No respect! You know I’ve got three daughters. This is my neighborhood. You and your friends should show me some respect. You should let me wet my beak a little.” …Don Fanucci Thompson in “The Godfather Part II”

Barbados Free-For-All: No Conflict Of Interest Rules, No Transparency In Spending Your Tax Dollars

Amelot Oil Barbados, Ltd. has been running a small biofuel refinery project in Barbados. Last week company executives from New York met with Barbados government officials about expanding the project. Amelot is seeking significant investment from Barbados through tax incentives, relaxed duties, direct financial investment and having Barbados government employees and subcontractors working on the project at all phases until startup.

And Amelot was told it is all coming to them courtesy of the David Thompson government.

How many government members or their families own shares in Amelot or it’s parent company and affiliates? How many will be awarded consulting or supply contracts on a project that is receiving tax dollars???

“None of your business. If it was your business, we would have rules about such things… and we don’t” says Godfather Thompson.

Global Newswire: Amelot

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43 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Political Corruption, Politics, Politics & Corruption

43 responses to “Amelot Oil Barbados, Ltd. About To Get Major Barbados Government Funding & Concessions – How Many Government Members Or Their Families Own Shares?

  1. Hants

    You all may soon have to use cooking oil straight from the frying pan into your Gas tank.

    If the world goes into recession, wanna in trouble too.

  2. WildyCoyte.

    I have so much to contribute to your threads BFP but as far as i can see,all is lost for Barbados and Bajans as far as your tax dollars are concerned,no matter who is in power,you,your children and their children will be paying for the crooked and corrupt acts of both parties.

    Until Bajans rise up,start protesting and get these ancient laws that are holding back citizens changed both of these parties will be taking you for a ride,so to me it makes no sense voting in the next election because all we do is change a B to a D and so on and so forth..you get where i am coming from,dark days are ahead my friends dark days.

  3. Real Ting

    off topic BFP but wasn’t a Sargeant Paul Vaughn charged today for accepting bribes? That name shoud be very familiar to you

  4. Real Ting

    u can delete these two posts when you read them.

  5. Thomas Gresham

    In recent months the international environment has been mixed from a Barbados perspective. The price of oil, one of our key imports, has fallen by almost 50%. A barrle of oil has fallen in price form over $140 in July to under $100 now. This should on its own lower our cost of living were it not for the administrative price, cost and tax increases announced this year. But the bottom line is that there has been a significant improvement in the external cost environment.

    The global financial environment has worsened significantly, but are financial system is largely immune to that. The potential knock-on effect is via lower income in our tourist markets and lower tourism spend. I am worried about this “income” effect and I am anxious that the government has yet to roll out a jobs and growth strategy, beyond blaming our problems on foreign immigrants.

  6. Hants

    Thomas Gresham says

    “The global financial environment has worsened significantly, but our financial system is largely immune to that.

    Please explain to us less educated how you made this conclusion.

    I see Barbados as a little country with a fragile economy that suffers greatly when there is a downturn in the world economy.

    I live in Canada and given that our economy is not the best right now, prehaps you can tell us what the Barbados Government can do to create jobs and growth.

  7. say what?

    Hants
    Do you REALLY expect intelligent comments from Thomas Gresham?

    Oil basically moved from around $80 per barrel and is now around $100. Who in their right mind would use a temporary spike if near $150 as a benchmark?

    …and when could Barbados be ever immune from world economic chaos?????

  8. Hants

    @ say what

    I am very limited in knowledge of economics so I have to ask the likes of Thomas Gresham who claims to have much “higher learning”.

    It is like this. I paid $2.80bds per litre for premium 94 octane gas today.
    Regular 89 0ctane was $2.52bds per litre.

    If Canada can’t shield us from high Gas prices,how can Barbados do better? Just asking.

    The price of food has been rising steadily in Canada so what do Bajans expect?

    Yes life in Canada is still good for a lot of us but it is getting more difficult.

    Tell us Thomas Gresham what the Government of Barbados needs to do.

  9. .78

    But Thompy PROMISED to put conflict of interest rules in place via a Ministerial Code the very moment he was elected.

    You see, BFP? There is a Ministerial Code in place that makes conflicts of interest like you mention illegal!

    What is that you say? Thompy lied and didn’t implement his integrity rules for government Ministers?

    I wonder why he didn’t put those rules in place like he said?

    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

  10. Maat

    As regards your thread BFP, I have had dealings with the people involved in the Amelot Barbados Company and it is really nothing like what you suggest.

    Amelot has recently bought into the business of a local Barbadian entrepreneur who was basically doing a backyard bio fuel business (turning used cooking oil into fuel). Amelot’s investment was business to business with no Government lackey involvement. None of the principles of the original local company is connected to government officials or any other big ups as far as I know.

    Most people would know the small Bajan operation and where it is located at the Future Centre Trust in St. Thomas.

    The local Managing Director is an extra ordinary young man, but he is not ‘connected’

    Peace

    ********************

    BFP says,

    That is all about to change and that is why the meeting referred to in the press release.

    There are no rules, Maat. Your polite and anonymous assurances are not the ITAL – Integrity, Transparency and Accountability Legislation that Thompson lied about to get elected.

    Please submit your Freedom of Information Act request about all government investment in the project and send the information here before you start trying to defend that which is hidden.

    You say “None of the principles of the original local company is connected to government officials or any other big ups as far as I know.”

    That is “as far as you know” – and even if that is true, you know how things work ’bout hey.

    We need laws Maat. We need the laws that we were promised.

  11. Partial

    Having read the post, it doesn’t appear that BFP made any suggestions of impropriety.

    From what I understand, they asked some questions and are looking for answers.

    If we had ITAL, nobody would have to be suspicious about everything that Gov’t is doing.

  12. J

    I think that Maat is right. The company is small but has potential for growth in an environmentally friendly way. Whats wrong with using tax dollars to help a small company grow?

    ************************

    BFP says,

    Maybe nothing is wrong with using tax dollars to help the company grow, but there is something wrong when taxpayers are denied the RIGHT to know how their money is spent.

    When the government money starts to flow, much of it flows to government members and their families because there are no laws against it. We need the integrity laws that Thompson lied about to get elected.

  13. reality check

    “Whats wrong with using tax dollars to help a small company grow?”

    Absolutely nothing if ITAL and ministerial code are fully implemented and full transparency and disclosure is made.

    IT IS THE VERY ABSENCE OF THESE BASIC SAFEGUARDS THAT HOLDS BACK THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES AND KEEPS THEM FROM MOVING FORWARD.

  14. reality check

    “Whats wrong with using tax dollars to help a small company grow?”

    Absolutely nothing if ITAL and ministerial code are fully implemented and full transparency and disclosure is made.

    IT IS THE VERY ABSENCE OF THESE BASIC SAFEGUARDS ENSHRINED IN LEGISLATION THAT HOLDS BACK THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES AND KEEPS THEM FROM MOVING FORWARD.

    Obama made it clear in his speech yesterday that it is the kind of business practice and philosophy that permits special interest groups to determine policy for short term profits rather than long term benefits of all citizens that has left the US economy on the brink of ruin.

    Thompson needs to show substance and not merely offer Obama an opportunity to visit a country which has beautiful beaches but rather invite Obama to visist a country that respects the Rule of Law and is a leader in the vanguard of ITAL and transparency in the caribbean.

    This would be a substantive move that would endear him to International democratic acceptance and perhaps financial assistance rather than simply a shallow invitation to come and visit the country for a photo op.

  15. art

    The BIDC does help to fund a percentage to do some things; eg training of staff; but never, never, never to give financial incentives like setup costs. That is a no no.

    There are other companies, like the Caribbean Export Development Agency who also may help with a percentage of certain costs if these will bring development to the island in a favourable way, eg foreign exchange generation.

    Many companies in Barbados have benefited from the BIDC’s help for many years, and it is a worthy point to note that if a small company that can potentially generate foreign exchange wants to avail of the BIDC funding it should go there and investigate to see if any of their small business needs fit the profile of what BIDC can help with.

    In recent years much of the funding came from a multi-million European grant to aid development in the Caribbean. This is also a worthy point to note in this thread, because we must come to terms with it. Maat, I would please like to draw your attention to this fact.

    The linked article might be incorrect in its terminology. Can’t imagine that we are paying for setup and/or equipment?

    It is not a widely publicised fact that BIDC can help, and I do hope that by sharing this it will help Bajans who read it to make a business that can help Barbados to be more viable.

    One sincerely would hope that funds are never abused, but utilised in an appropriate way to benefit Barbados’ development, since that is the mission of the development agencies for the country.

    Biodiesel will probably help to reduce some of our diesel imports. It should help save some foreign exchange. We should also be inquiring how much can it actually help Barbados?

    ************************

    BFP says,

    Hi art!

    You “hope” the government funds and European grants are never abused? You “hope”???

    We “hope” too, but we also know we have no laws.

    Now, please tell us exactly what happened to the ten million dollars the EU gave to Barbados last year to “restructure” our sugar economy. Where is it? How was it used? Did any government official or family member receive any of it for any purpose? How do you know?

    Laws. We need the laws that we were promised by Thompson. The laws that he LIED about to get elected.

  16. Thomas Gresham

    Dear Hants,

    I am not sure why one sentence was taken out of the context of the others. In June we were worried about the impact of oil prices rising from $100 per barrel in January to close to $150 and a threat of further increases to come. Since then oil has come back down to $100. That is an improvement from where we were in the cost environment. It may not last, but it is better than an oil price at $150 and rising.

    There is a raft of bankruptcies and forced marriages in the US and UK banking system today. I am in London today advising on how to get out of the mess the bankers put themselves in. We in Barbados are not affected directly, in that our banking system is not directly impacted by the fall of Lehamn brothers. But we are indirectly impacted, via what that will mean to demand for tourism. I said exactly that, not that we are immune to the global environment.

    What should the government do?

    This is not an environment to raise $104m of taxes and cut $90m of subsidies. The government’s macro-economic stance is wrong. The US government has just increased its debt levels by 50% this year in order to address its problems. Despite a bigger deficit than ours it is not raising taxes but cutting them.

    This is not a time to invest in a “Caribbean brand” as opposed to a Barbados brand and focus on encouraging the diaspora in our tourism investment. This is just a silly waste of tax payers dollars – as is building a new airport and refurbishing and not rebuilding QEH.

    What should the government be doing? Three key areas. No. 1. Education. More money poured into reducing class sizes and better training of teachers, especially in the sciences. Just 20% of the increased tax revenues would transform our education output. Encourage greater flexibility of our schools and colleges in what and how they teach and more aggressively expand the concept of education beyond school years.

    No. 2. A competitive modern economy. Push for a signing of the EPA and supporting a private-sector, service oriented economy by making it easy for small businesses to set up and sell services from here. Cutting the regulatory tape. Aiming for a 30 min set up time, $10 fee, and huge fines if disclosures prove inaccurate later to help speed up set up. Reform of the port and customs and simplification of the tax code is part of that too and would support a reduction in imported costs.

    No. 3. Increase targeted welfare, linked to re-training on occasion, on those most vulnerable to the cost of living and job dislocation from international trade. The extra $200,000 on welfare when taxes were going up $104m was fine for Hammie, but not for me.

  17. The scout

    What’s wrong with using tax dollars to help a small company to grow? Come on, bajans really got short memories. Everybody seem th forget what happened to “helping small companies grow”. Remember a small company dealing with “Hardwoods”? While the company was “growing” taxpayers dollars were dwindling. Not again, another forensic investigation?

  18. art

    Dear BFP: Yes. You would know more than a simpleton like me about whether the funds are being slushed. I just like to do my work- I don’t trouble anyone. But I want to see Barbados go further and maintain its integrity, for the sake of the future generations.

    We do believe that ITAL legislation will get shoved under the Xmas carpet, then under the recession carpet, but maybe we are wrong.

    Far more people read about this and understand it than you all (or I) might think. This ITAL promise is what may lose or win the election next time around, campaigns starting in 3 years. And if ITAL only brought diluted without the whistleblower legislation, in the second half of the term, it will make matters worse IMO.

    Non-partisan, urging the incumbent administration to please remember to fulfill its promises.

    Meanwhile, honest people should check whether BIDC can help them to get up and going by the boot straps

    art.

    **********************

    BFP Comments…

    Art, you said “And if ITAL only brought diluted without the whistleblower legislation, in the second half of the term, it will make matters worse IMO.”

    Very wise words. You are no simpleton, that is for sure. We haven’t been calling for Whistleblower legislation every time we call for ITAL, but I think we should to get people talking about it.

    We need a new acronym… ITAL is Integrity, Transparency and Accountability Legislation. How shall we fit the Whistleblower law in there. The creation of the acronym “ITAL” has made it easy to talk about, but “WITAL” seems to be the only possibility we can come up with this early in the morning.

  19. art

    Dear BFP
    A la Grenville Phillips last year, ITAL will be unsuccessful unless a way is made for public and private servants to safely report wrongdoings without fear of reprisals. Mr. Philips wrote about these things last year, and the threads were responded to positively by WIV.

    That is enough for me, it must be brought.

    The law must protect “whistle blowers” (the people who blow the whistle on the wrong-doers) so that the whistle blower does not lose their job or their income.

    A whistle blower is a right thinking person who reports a corporate crime.

    I tell you this- then the stories will come forth in abundance and the bad guys will be scared to do these things.

    Facilitate the blowing of the whistle on corruption: Ital roti with whistleblow sauce!

  20. The Punisher

    A barrel of oil cost $94.00, a whopping $22 less than it did on January 15, 2008. Perhaps Scout, Art or Hants can say why there has been no change in the cost of living or reduction at the pump?

    What is happening to all of the taxes and increased VAT we are paying?

    By the way! What is up with Ronald Jones?

  21. Blue Sky

    Can someone tell me any difference between the DLP government and the BLP government? At least the BLP gave us 3 good years when they were first elected before they started stealing. thompson’s group are at it from the start.

  22. Hants

    @ The Punisher

    September 18, 2008 at 10:24 pm
    A barrel of oil cost $94.00, a whopping $22 less than it did on January 15, 2008. Perhaps Scout, Art or Hants can say why there has been no change in the cost of living or reduction at the pump?

    I have no answer for you because I live in an oil rich country called Canada and we have been paying more for Gas than you do in Barbados.

    http://www.cbc.ca/consumer/story/2008/09/18/gas-drop.html

  23. Sad To Say

    Blue Sky: May be Thomson et al does not see themselves sticking around for more than 5 years so they have decided to cram every trick of the BLP into the time that will be allotted to them. I have always said that there are many “lean and hungry” DLP lackeys who have been out in the wilderness for “too long” and I suspect that in the next six months we are going to see a number of DLP wheelers and dealers coming to the fore. When I voted for the DLP on Jan 14 I never anticipated this, however, over the last two months I have been able to realize that we have been hoodwinked by a number of criminals who were just waiting for their turn at the trough. Time is longer than twine and persons like Thompson must realise that he has to stand up to the crooked elements in his cabinet. Abdicating this fundamental responsibility will relegate this DLP administration (and Thompson) to the lowest rung when compared to all of the governments who have been privileged to run our beautiful BDS

  24. reality check

    “Don Fanucci Thompson in “The Godfather Part II”

    brilliant metaphor for a situation which isn’t all that funny!!!

    Almost as brilliant and saucy as the political commentary that an Attorney-General steeped in the political life of a country for many years could cross the floor to the highest court in the land and all of a sudden become “Just like a Virgin”

    Unfortuneately these men probably don’t have the ability to laugh at themselves. They actually read their own press clippings paid for at taxpayers expense.

  25. art

    “Jatropha: The Wonder Weed”

    I went to the Amelot site and then to a couple more sites through their links. This plant produces a lot of inedible, but combustible, oil in arid areas of low agricultural productivity.

    I wonder whether this fuel can go straight into engines? In one part of the site it says so, but apparently it must be cracked with methanol for diesel engines.

    Anyone know more? Can Mr. Callender come on and tell us more?

  26. art

    And question to Mr. Callender. If one grows a bunch of jatropha, what price will it cost to grind it up to oil, process it in the apparatus shown on the linked linked site, and produce the gallon of biodiesel? Is it less than a gallon of diesel or more?

  27. Inkwell

    Every other week, BFP moans and groans how David Thompson lied about members of the DLP signing a code of conduct if they won the election and promised ITAL within 100 days of assuming office. The same BFP who were so naive as to take the word of a politician who was on his third strike and would do or say anything to get elected, announced loud and long that Thompson would follow through and endorsed the DLP, no doubt persuading some other gullible readers to follow suit.

    Mine was the sole, lonely voice warning that the DLP’s feet should be held to the fire and they should not be elected until at least they displayed the signatures of their members on a code of conduct and committed to ITAL.

    I argued that the only way to force them to do this was to keep them in opposition for five more years to show that we meant business. Even though everyone was convinced of corruption in the BLP and arrogance was certainly evident, five more years of the BLP would not have been too high a price to pay for the guarantee of ITAL and a framework for good governance for future generations of Barbadians.

    No one supported my call, the DLP seem to have every intention of making full use of its turn at the trough and we have the bleak prospect of continued corruption with nowhere to turn in the foreseeable future, except back to the BLP for more of the same.

    I hope you enjoy it.

    ****************************

    BFP says,

    Inkwell, old friend… please don’t re-write history. While it is true that BFP came out on January 6, 2008 with a public position that we believed Mr. Thompson was sincere and that we would vote for him… we also said the following…

    “This does not mean that we won’t hold your feet and the DLP to the fire, and it doesn’t mean that Barbados Free Press has gone soft on the DLP or its leader. Where we disagree with your or your government’s actions you can expect the same double-barreled blast as before. Even worse if you let us down.”

    You can confirm that by reading our article Dear Mr. Thompson, We Believe You Will Do It…

    Only two days before, we published our article David Thompson Reveals DLP’s Integrity and Freedom Of Information Plans – Much Cut and Pasted From The Internet Only A Few Days Ago

    We said in that article…

    “Frankly, we expected – we hoped – for better from the DLP. For two years we have been demanding that both the BLP and the DLP implement integrity standards within their own parties and as legislation. The DLP could have, should have, shown leadership all along. They should have, could have, had the legislation all set to go.

    But what we received from the DLP was a cut and paste job thrown together at the last moment just for the election.

    Barbados deserved better.

    Do Thompson and the DLP really mean it? Are they willing to make the very tough decisions that go hand-in-hand with integrity legislation?”

    So our support of the DLP was with two raised eyebrows, and frankly, although we wanted Thompson to win to turf out the existing cabal, we were not naive.

    YOUR POSITION is that the BLP should have stayed in for another four years, further consolidating their position and strengthening their networks using all the resources of government – while we waited for the DLP to … what? Adopt a code that they had refused to adopt in the past 14 years?

    OUR POSITION is that putting the DLP into power…

    1/ Disturbed the existing corrupt BLP cabals.
    2/ Denied the corrupt BLP the resources of government.
    3/ Showed the people and the politicians that ITAL – integrity issues – is enough to take a government out of office.
    4/ Raised the level of public consciousness about ITAL to levels never seen before in Barbados.
    5/ Gave the public the language of ITAL as even the corrupt politicians and media were forced to speak about it in public.
    6/ Produced verbal and written commitments from the DLP as to implementing ITAL. They did not, they lied, but we actually got something in writing from them.

    All this had to happen to get to where we are now…. where the public is finally realising that it is the absence of laws that produce corruption – not the quality or character of those they elect or appoint to public office.

    Without laws, who can resist the temptation? You? Me? Thompson? Lowe? Mottley?

    No one.

    We are where we need to be now.

    Lately you see many lawyers and police officers charged with offenses. This never happened before. Never.

    That was a result of a new awareness that is evidence of changes to our culture.

    The public campaign to recall the Thompson government and to run candidates who are willing to personally adopt ITAL and declare assets etc before an election is the next step.

    Thompson and his gang are lying piggies at the trough who have proven exactly what they are. Unfortunately even Barbados Underground, Adrian Hinds and other DLP supporters who solidly beat the ITAL drum prior to winning the election have now gone entirely silent on ITAL.

    Perhaps they are embarrassed – but whatever happens, the public mind is on ITAL like never before.

    The BLP cannot now simply change personnel and come back as before.

  28. The scout

    The Punisher
    As you would recall, the gas price at the pump fuctuated according to the price of the crude oil. That was done in the last session of the former administration. The problem is, this present government/party was in the doldrums for too long and since have too many hungry mouths to feed. They have realise that one fat calf was too small to divide so they’re slaughtering a whole herd. Once everyone is satisfied and meat left, then the others would get. It is only then when the coffers are full and overflowing that gas prices and other necessary items would reduce. Consider it a form of reparation.

  29. Inkwell

    Up there in the clouds where your heads are you must be sniffing some euphoria producing substance where you are imagining a “public campaign to recall the Thompson government and to run candidates who are willing to personally adopt ITAL and declare assets etc before an election” Are you going to stay up there in the clouds and initiate this campaign?

    Another side effect of your euphoria…”The BLP cannot now simply change personnel and come back as before.” I ask “Why on earth not?” They will come back with much the same team. Both parties know now that they can simply continue to make promises of ITAL and that no one can force them to commit. The Mottley and Arthur asset declaration in the house was nothing more than a theatrical performance designed to embarrass the government.

    Great opportunity lost. As you say, BFP, we will have to agree to disagree.

    **************************

    BFP says,

    Other countries have disclosure rules prior to elections. Other countries have recall provisions. Other countries have seen groundswell popular movements based upon new ideas.

    We say Barbados can have all that and more.

    You are too old, Inkwell. Worn out. Hopeless. Tired of fighting.

    Step aside and let us younger people achieve what your generation did not. We refuse to listen to “can’t, won’t work, you’re all dreamers” talk.

    Two and a half years ago we started something here at BFP. We shall not give up. Ever.

    As we have often said but not really seriously implemented as yet: we must now appeal to the international community to put pressure on our government to adopt integrity legislation. We have some ideas and you will be hearing from us with the rest of the world.

    Cheers!

    Cliverton & Marcus having a very wet breakfast!

  30. Inkwell

    “You are too old, Inkwell. Worn out. Hopeless. Tired of fighting.”

    And you are so flush with your perception of your self importance that you have forgotten your manners…if you ever had any.

  31. hopelessness

    Inkwell

    mannners and deference to corruption is exactly what got Barbados in the position it is today.

    Your acceptance of the status quo is unacceptable to most citizens. It is a sign of hopelessness and is very very sad.

    You need to be madder than hell and not prepared to take it anymore.

  32. The Punisher

    The Scout,

    Well said! I agree with you.

    After 14 years in the wilderness, there are are all now trying desperately; pushing down each other – straws falling falling from their back pockets and daggers in hand, trying to get their fill of the fatted calf.

    One Minister told his constituents: “I waited 14 years boy, these forst five years is mine.”

    What an awful spectacle!

  33. The Punisher

    reality chack

    There is something very wrong with using our tax dollars to help small companies. Did the Prime Minister not say he is gong to cutout the middle man? Wouldn’t that be throwing money in a well?

    We have already heard of a $35.00 lock being changed for $2500. Do you mean small companies like that, or the ones who are now building $57,000 houses for $89,000?

  34. art

    The BIDC doesn’t just give ‘you’ cash, at least not to my personnal knowledge.

    You go with your financial recirds, your business plan, your project plan, and a projection of what the country will benefit from, that emanates from ‘your’ business.

    Above it is implied that the funding is slush and going to friends/family, and maybe it does happen. But that is not my experience. This funding is available for businesses who can justify the good that they want to do, that they can do, and will do, for Barbados.

    When going to BIDC the above advice may be your key.

    If this is not the case, then Barbados needs the whistle to be blown on the aberrants, but all will be hoping that it can be used in such a way that we as a country can collectively benefit by growth.

  35. Bajan Agent

    I’m a Godfather fan so I love the graphic for this topic.

    After being allowed to wet his beak, Don Fanucci was ushered into the next life by the upcoming Don.

    I wonder if art does imitate life?…

  36. Pingback: Government Slow On Renewable Energy « Bajan Global Report

  37. Sadly true

    BFP says in this article “Maybe nothing is wrong with using tax dollars to help the company grow, but there is something wrong when taxpayers are denied the RIGHT to know how their money is spent.

    When the government money starts to flow, much of it flows to government members and their families because there are no laws against it. We need the integrity laws that Thompson lied about to get elected.”

    Get over it. Thompson lied and those integrity laws will not happen.

  38. B.L.P.

    What nonsense y’all talking?
    We promised you a big offshore oil & gas field
    just before y’all got silly and foolishly threw us out.

    NOW the oil & gas field is GONE!
    When y’all get back to reality, said oil & gas field will re-appear and save us from any foolish attempts to grow a weed(hemp?) to make vehicle fuel from anything other than fossil hydrocarbons.

    Vote the BLP back in and watch us cure all your woes.
    D.Small man is WE man, coz dum got nuff o’ he
    and we want his votes to get back into POWER!

  39. what will they think of next

    BFP, all wunna talking the BLP will come back and it will be business as usual or worse.

  40. Tweety Bird

    Why have we not heard from the PM?

  41. No hope, need change

    Tired of false hope. Barbados needs real change and we’re not going to have that with either the BLP or the DLP.

    I read somewheres here abouts that if a dead cat stood for election it would gather many votes. That’s how fed up people are and you can count me in.

  42. Peltdownman

    @art & the BIDC

    Any funding from the BIDC through the Technical Assistance Programme (TAP) has to be accounted-for, and receipts provided. This leaves very little “wriggle-room” for misuse of the funds.
    It appears to me, BFP, that you have set-up a small and progressive company to be knocked down as an excuse for railing on again about ITAL. That is phoney journalism worthy of the News Of The World.

  43. Straight talk

    Peltdown Man:

    “Any funding from the BIDC through the Technical Assistance Programme (TAP) has to be accounted-for, and receipts provided. This leaves very little “wriggle-room” for misuse of the funds.”

    Are you sure?

    Did Hardwood Housing manage to “wriggle” away with $2 million?