Obama Assassination Plot In Denver – White Supremacist Link

“They’re Just Good ‘Ol Boys – Never Meanin No Harm”

Any candidate for the Presidency of the the United States of America faces threats that range from wackos without the means to serious people who have the resources and don’t care if they get caught or die as long as their mission is completed.

Where do the plotters in Denver come in? The story is still developing.

Maybe the world will eventually know the truth about suspects Tharim Robert Gartrell, Nathan Johnson and Shawn Robert Adolf, or maybe it won’t… but in my opinion Barack Obama is likely to face more credible threats than any other Presidential candidate in the last century.

Here are a few links, but the story is developing rapidly so you should check with other sources to see what is happening…

Rocky Mountain News: US Attorney Downplays Possible Plot To Kill Obama

CBS4 – Plot to Kill Obama: Shoot From High Vantage Point

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53 Comments

Filed under Barack Obama, Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, FBI, Police, Race

53 responses to “Obama Assassination Plot In Denver – White Supremacist Link

  1. Bimbro

    I don’t think that too, many people will be surprised by this, especially, black people!! All I can say is: actions produce reactions!!

    Perhaps, they watched the Olympics!! Time will tell!!

  2. Eddie - True Change Agent

    This is sad. Surely Obama knows what he is getting into. He, unlike any other president or presidential contender will have very real threats against him.
    We trust and hope nothing will happen to him.

  3. The scout

    The more things change the more they remain the same. I have been following the U.S. election processs and I expected this for some time now. The simple things that egnite the american ego is just short of childish. The man is too slim, his name means he is muslim, he and his wife are to loving and of course the main one HE”S BLACK. While I support his campaign, I fear for his life. I also fear for the morals of that sick society they call “the american dream.”

  4. Lady Anon

    Every white supremesist is a “good ole boy meanin no harm.” The assassin of MLK was a “good ole boy meanin no harm”.

    I am sure that Obama and his family are well aware of the risk being taken in running for office. What scares me, though is that there are some people in office, like the US Attorney, who will not take such threats seriously.

  5. crossroads

    I hope this never becomes a reality. I don’t wish to consider what would happen in the USA and how it will affect the rest of the world. Unfortunatley there are some sick wackos out there that would like nothing more than to associate their name with such a situiation.

  6. Anon27

    This has just as much to do with lack of education as it does with being sick wackos. The dummying down of Americans is now coming home to roost. The moral decay of America can be directly linked to the lack of emphasis placed on education.
    As a Canadian who watches a lot of American documentary type programs and reads several U.S. newspapers and magazines, it appalls me to see how the the average American is so intellectually unenlightened, uneducated and living in ignorance.
    Those “two good ole boys” personify all that is wrong with America. Uneducated, mental deficients with guns…….what a combo!

  7. Duppy Lizard

    Let’s put some prespective into this issue folks – In my lifetime there has been one successful assassination of an American President and one Presidential hopeful, 2 or 3 attempts at a President and I think one attempt at a Presidential hopeful. But of course these were white men so no problem there – just some foolish white people knocking off other foolish white people. If it was a plot on McCain I doubt we’d be reading about it here.

  8. 329.18

    Predictable.

    —————————-
    I like the gorgeous specimen on the right.
    That one looks particularly brainy.

    Real Top Class material thar!

  9. Tony Hall

    “As a Canadian who watches a lot of American documentary type programs and reads several U.S. newspapers and magazines, it appalls me to see how the the average American is so intellectually unenlightened, uneducated and living in ignorance.”

    Anonymous,
    I couldn’t agree more. As a Bajan living in the USA for over 20 years I have come to the realisation that the average white American lives in ignorance. They do not understand nor want to understand other cultures, and there is a saying that the “lack of knowledge of other cultures breeds ignorance” I am mostly referring to the mid- west and southern population. They are the worst. Many of them are not educated, not politically astute, unable to think for themselves so the powers that be capitalise on their ignorance. When people of that ilk see a “black” people like Obama and his wife, both highly educated they ask themselves how can that be because in their minds black people are lazy and ignorant. That is when the anger reaches a boiling point and that’s when you hear the hate coming from their mouths followed by the threats. These people are just IGNORANT.

  10. crossroads

    That is precisely the point Duppy L. Obama could be the first Black President of the USA. Who cares if its McCain?

  11. Eddie

    “Assasination”.
    It is the word which everyone knows is REAL but has been hushed and muted throughout this campaign.
    I suspect it has been veiled in order to lessen the potential for some sicko to try to become famous.
    But the problem is that as long as this particular candidate is in the running, or should he become President, this burden will stalk and shadow his every move.

  12. crossroads

    “Every white supremesist is a “good ole boy meanin no harm”
    Sounds like the local mothers who claim their sons we’re “good boys, he never hurt nabody”

  13. Green Monkey

    Every white supremesist is a “good ole boy meanin no harm.” The assassination of MLK was a “good ole boy meanin no harm”.

    At a civil action for wrongful death brought by the King family against some suspected co-conspirators in the MLK assassination, a jury determined US government agencies were complicit in the assassination of MLK. It appears James Earl Ray was no more than the designated patsy.

    Dr. William F. Pepper was the King Family’s lawyer-investigator in the 1999 Circuit Court trial in Memphis, Tennessee, King Family versus Jowers and Other Unknown Co-Conspirators. The Honorable James E. Swearengen (Division 4, judge presiding) stated to the jury after reaching its verdict:

    “In answer to the question did Loyd Jowers participate in a conspiracy to do harm to Martin Luther King, your answer is yes. Do you also find that others, including governmental agencies, were parties to this conspiracy as alleged by the defendant? Your answer to that one is also yes.”

    The story of Martin Luther King’s assassination, and the 1999 trial where the truth of this event was finally revealed in a court of law is now encapsulated in Dr. William F. Pepper’s new book, released by Verso this month: An Act of State – The Execution of Martin Luther King. The dust jacket summarizes what many have intuitively known for more than thirty years:

    “William Pepper, attorney and friend of Dr. King and the King family, became convinced after years of investigation that not only was Ray not the shooter, but that King had been targeted as part of a larger conspiracy to stop the anti-war movement, and to prevent King from gaining momentum in his promising Poor People’s Campaign. Ten years into his investigation, in 1988, Pepper agreed to represent Ray. While he was never able to successfully appeal the sentence before Ray’s death, he was able to build an air-tight case against the real perpetrators. In 1999, Loyd Jowers and co-conspirators were brought to trial in a wrongful death civil action suit on behalf of the King family. Seventy witnesses set out the details of the conspiracy in a plot to murder King that involved J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI, Richard Helms and the CIA, the military, the local Memphis police, and organized crime figures from New Orleans and Memphis. The evidence was unimpeachable. The jury took an hour to find for the King family. But the silence following these shocking revelations was deafening. Like the pattern during all the investigations of the assassination throughout the years, no major media outlet would cover the story. It was effectively buried.

    “Until now, the details, evidence, and personalities of all these nefarious characters have gone unreported. In An Act of State, you finally have the truth before you — how the United States government effectively shut down one of the most galvanizing movements for social change by stopping its leader dead in his tracks.”

    http://www.ratical.org/ratville/JFK/MLKactOstate.html

    Here are some excerpts from the King civil trial posted as Youtube playlists.

    Closing statement of the King family’s attorney William Pepper to the jury:

    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=6CDDC2D378CC12CD

    Trial testimony by expert witness William Schaap on FBI and CIA disinfo:

    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=BA69081DC9C0AE84

  14. BFP

    BIMBRO permanently banned from Barbados Free Press

    … for a racist comment left on this post.

    Yup… we’ve reached our limit.

    Marcus

  15. Beefcake

    I would like to see the racist comment posted by Bimbro, even if certain words need to be blotted out.

    **************

    BFP says,

    Done. Posted below.

  16. Hants

    Another interesting poster who could not follow the very liberal rules on this blog.

  17. Sargeant

    BFP I hold no brief for Bimbro as I thought most of his posts were asinine but isn’t this the point I was making recently when you used the “n word” ? Having used it you gave carte blanche for everyone to post racist comments

    ***********************

    BFP says,

    There is a big difference in our using the word sarcastically and in context of the article we wrote and what Bimbro wrote.

    But ok folks… just for the record, let’s have a discussion about what Bimbro wrote and in the context of all his comments. Here it is…

    “I’m convinced that this is a result of Usain Bolt’s insane spectacle at the Olympics, last week!! Before then, people, even the white supremacists, were getting used to the idea of a black president of the US but subsequent to his performance, they must have thought ‘we don’t want a black, monkey’ occupying that position, apropos his Jamaican, dance!!”

    The above comment was posted by Bimbro on the article about the Obama assassination plot. BFP staff banned Bimbro for life for the comment.

    What do our readers think?

  18. BGR

    The moral decay of America can be directly linked to the lack of emphasis placed on education.
    As a Canadian who watches a lot of American documentary type programs and reads several U.S. newspapers and magazines, it appalls me to see how the the average American is so intellectually unenlightened, uneducated and living in ignorance.

    ——————————–
    Baby if I were next to you I would shake your hands. If you can see it and I could see it, surely there are others out there who can see it too.
    Sometimes when I read the comment sections to get a feedback on what the readers think on a particular topic/issue on news sites I sometimes wonder how long american intelligence went out through the window. Lack of articulation, analysis, depth, seems like most can only express themselves using four-letter words. How sad.

  19. Thomas Gresham

    The role of education is critical.

    The is a new book out by two Harvard economics profs (Goldin and Katz) who point out and argue the following:

    (1) For most of the last century the US economy grew rapidly and income inequality fell. This was the “American Century”.

    (2) Income inequality began reversing form the mid-1970s, co-inciding with a falling off of investment in public primary education.

    (3) Income inequality has now worsened so much in the US, it is now as bad as it was in the late 18th century. The age of the “Robber Barons”. The US has the most unequal distribution of income of any other developed country.

    (4) Income inequality is a race between technology progress and investment in public primary education. As technology has raced ahead and investment in education has faltered, making workers less flexible in dealing with the new jobs that use new technologies, income inequality has widened.

    (5) That was the bad news, the good news is that this can be reversed by investing more in public primary education. I think we can learn a lot from that in Barbados . I have been shocked by the inability of some bloggers to distinguish between faith and science (testable predictions) on other treads. We need to invest far more in public education – somethings will then get less investment, but there is no more important investment than education.

  20. Straight talk

    When and if the status quo decide Obama is a threat to their positions, there will be no prior arrests, it will be a done deed, with a patsy up front.

    These pathetic dregs of humanity are no threat, they are a timely warning.

    Obama has already met (along with HR Clinton) the real powers behind the throne, when they both went missing for 5 days two months ago.

    Barack, a breath of fresh air from the cesspool of US corporate controlled politics?

    Give me a break.

  21. Anon27

    Tony Hall: Many of them are not educated, not politically astute, unable to think for themselves so the powers that be capitalise on their ignorance.

    I do not think that the declining educational standards in the U.S. are an accidental oversight or misdirection of public funds. I believe that there is a concerted effort on the part of the elite/government/rich to keep the masses controllable and what better way to do it than keep them in ignorance? Without the ability to think independantly, they swallow whatever pap is spooned to them. Without education they can not rise above their circumstances which is just what the elite want.
    Regardless of what the U.S. government would have you believe, racism remains deeply ingrained in poor white communities. There is a vested interest in having them remain so.

  22. Sargeant

    BFP

    How come I’m still under moderation?

    ***************

    BFP says,

    Because we were all busy. Now I’ve rescued your comment from the spam bucket.

    george

  23. 329.18

    How was it someone once described Russia/USSR?
    A paradox wrapped in a riddle, with an enigma involved on the periphery somehow? ..anyone?

    Does that now almost-describe the USA?
    ..which is quite some way down the long slippery slope
    but very much in denial,thereof?

    USA peaked around 1980, I estimate
    Anything after that date is ‘slippery slope’.

    Oh dear…that would mean they’re some 28 years down the slippery slope?
    Ouch!

  24. JC

    Anon. I am glad you have realised that I thought it was only me ……

  25. Anon27

    Turns out these two pathetic souls are meth amphetamine freaks as well as uneducated racists. This harks back to my post about David Dukes criticism of Bajans lack of devotion to the gospel. At the time, I stated that his efforts would be served in his home state of Alabama where meth amphetamine addiction among poor and even middle class whites has eached epedemic proportions.

  26. Thomas Gresham

    Dear BFP,

    A comment regards to the Bimbro ban – and I speak as someone who does not often (OK, never) agree with Bimbro on serious matters.

    I think your position against racism is the right position. I applaud you for it, it is why I am on your blog (perhaps you are now regretting it now…….) and no longer post on others. I would like you to continue taking a strong stand against racism. In taking a strong stand, sometimes you will err on being too firm. Better that way than the other.

    I think this could be one of those occasions. My understanding of Bimbro’s piece (congratulations to you for offering it to us and opening yourself to criticism) I think he was describing what he thought a white supremacist would think, not what he thought.

    My instinct would be to give him one more chance, but I also recognise that he may have been on that one more chance already……

    *****************

    BFP says,

    Thanks for your input Thomas, and no, we certainly don’t regret you offering your thoughts. What a boring world it would be if we all thought alike.

    Still, we as an online community must have and maintain standards. The commenter known as Wishing In Vain made some wonderful contributions to this blog, but in the end he/she was banned when they started using their previous credibility to post material that was proven untrue AND they just wouldn’t let up on declaring everyone they disliked to be a homosexual or a lesbian.

    As to Bimbro, there have been a few protests from other readers that he/she is racist and prejudiced against blacks, but Bimbro’s comments have always stayed on one side of the line even if we began to feel uncomfortable with what was underneath. This latest one steps right over the line though.

    Let’s have a talk about this as a community. We’re willing to listen to our readers and may reconsider our ban depending upon what we hear from our readers and from Bimbro.

    Marcus

  27. Jason

    I think Bimbro described Bolt as a black monkey doing a dance.

    Ban stays as far as I concerned.

  28. Lady Anon

    I agree to the ban.

  29. Thistle

    The ban should stay. You warned him before, and we had to put up with his nonsense too often. He rode roughshod over us, calling us Bajans all sorts of insulting names and was exceedingly arrogant. He will continue to bombard BU now!

  30. Thistle

    BFP: On August 21st, Wishing In Vain posted a comment on here AFTER he was banned! You do not always stick to your word, BFP. You made a ruling sometime ago that no one would be allowed to use “Anonymous”, but that went through the eddoes; then you ruled that a blogger should have only one pseudonym. That went through the eddoes too! (Big Time). You are not consistent, kiddos.

    ****************

    BFP says,

    A little slack, please, thistle… We get over a thousand spam and legitimate comments a day and sometimes some leak through. Now that you have alerted us to WIV’s comment, we killed it.

    We try to enforce the rules and we usually do a 90% job. Perhaps if you alerted us to any breaches it would help us to police the blog.

    If you just can’t take our lack of professionalism, you do, of course, have the option of starting your own blog at WordPress.com. It costs nothing and I’m sure that you would soon be up to over 2.5 million visitors a year just like us!

  31. Thistle

    Aha! I think I know why my comment is awaiting moderation. I used an unmentionable name! So I’m changing that and will re-submit as follows:

    BFP: On August 21st, “the one who hopes in vain” posted a comment on here AFTER he was banned! You do not always stick to your word, BFP. You made a ruling sometime ago that no one would be allowed to use “Anonymous”, but that went through the eddoes; then you ruled that a blogger should have only one pseudonym. That went through the eddoes too! (Big Time). You are not consistent, kiddos.

  32. Tony Hall

    I agree with the ban. He was given a chance previously. Persons must be allowed to share their views, agree to disagree without calling one another nasty names and being insulting. What purpose does that type of behaviour serve? To me it indicates inadequacy.

  33. Adrian Hinds

    why ban de few people who does bother to contribute to this site? Tell yuh i don’t miss BFP at all.

  34. Anon 27

    Marcus do not lose any sleep over this issue. Bimbro was warned and he surely was aware that his comments were not well received by a great many contributors here. As for what Hinds has just posted, Bimbro did not “contribute” as such. For him posting in here was just a pathetic attempt at gaining attention.

  35. Adrian Hinds

    Wow watching contrive and agenda driven American documentaries is being presented as enlightenment? These two guys could have easily come from Alberta Canada.
    Tony my simple view is that if i want to learn about another culture i would read about, or visit practitioners of that culture in their native land.

    I have lived in the US for 15 years and my Fish-cakes and Bajan accent continues to be a hit with all the Americans i associate with. Must be the people you hang out with. Could be that in NY city where there is a multitude of cultures that you are experiencing your difficulties, they may not be as American as you think 🙂

    We all know if we care too that other cultures don’t care to learn about others, while demanding that Americans understand and appreciate theirs.

  36. Adrian Hinds

    Anon27
    August 26, 2008 at 11:16 pm
    Tony Hall: Many of them are not educated, not politically astute, unable to think for themselves so the powers that be capitalise on their ignorance.
    ==================================

    ah ha ha ha: Continue to castigate Americans while they continue to demonstrate in practice what success is all about. I like how Allan Stanford a Texan of all Americans goes to the Caribbean not knowing anything about cricket but schooled in sniffing out a money making endeavour, ends up revitalize Caribbean cricket. Does anybody know why it is in this day and age that government continues to decry the lack of entrepreneurial spirit amongst Bajans?
    …..The system of government of the US as compared to all the fifedoms of the English speaking caribbean tells me that Americans are more politically astute than you would want to admit.

  37. Jason

    Adrian Hinds says “why ban de few people who does bother to contribute to this site? Tell yuh i don’t miss BFP at all.”

    YOU ARE SUCH A HYPOCRITE ADRIAN.

    You were all for BFP and integrity legislation for two years. For two years you called down the BLP and Owen Arthur about no conflict of interest laws and no ITAL and you used Barbados Free Press to do it.

    Then when your party was elected and lied about their integrity laws intentions you started to criticised BFP for demanding that Thompson keep his promise.

    You DLP party got power and forget about Integrity Legislation. You forget about holding Thompson to his promise an you attack BFP instead.

    Barbados Free Press is for the people. You is for your party.

    Got your number fur sure!

  38. Anon 27

    As usual Adrian, you always seem to just miss the point or perhaps you contive to miss the point. I in no way in my original post made the claim that American television programs and in particular, documentary type programs, were “enlightening”.
    What I did say was that through viewing this type of programming, one could observe how education has faltered in the U.S. One only has to view the average American (lower to middle class) to see their poor use of language, lack of creative thinking and their inability to reason in a logical manner. Are you the average American Adrian?

  39. ru4real

    I dont think that Obama will face any more threats than any other President of the USA.
    They all face the danger of assassination.
    For any leading public figure its a known risk.

    These two (above) dont look as if they could cross the road on their own.

  40. Thistle

    BFP: Please, I am not accusing you of a lack of professionalism – that would be exceedingly myopic of me! Your last few sarcastic lines did not go amiss. But for your info., I DO have my own blog, but its kinda Top Secret and very controlled (I scared of the brainboxes and the control freaks!) and the topics are very general and on the social side, not scientific or technical. I haven’t got your emotional stamina, so its very limited and I’m not aiming to reach your figures in readership.

  41. Tony Hall

    “I have lived in the US for 15 years and my Fish-cakes and Bajan accent continues to be a hit with all the Americans i associate with. Must be the people you hang out with. Could be that in NY city where there is a multitude of cultures that you are experiencing your difficulties, they may not be as American as you think.”

    Adrian,
    You obviously weren’t paying attention to what I wrote. I made my comments based on persons who live in the midwest and south who have racist attitudes as a result of total ignorance. I never said I had any difficulties. New York is a melting pot and opportunies are here for one to be exposed to different cultures.

  42. Adrian Hinds

    Jason
    August 27, 2008 at 12:42 pm
    Adrian Hinds says “why ban de few people who does bother to contribute to this site? Tell yuh i don’t miss BFP at all.”

    YOU ARE SUCH A HYPOCRITE ADRIAN.

    ===================================

    ha ha ha ha I am talking about contributing, not the articles. I continue to support BFP call for ITAL, but do not appreciate their exuberance to ban people, and given the continued moderation that i and a number of seemly selected persons continue to suffer i have develop a resistance to posting here.
    MY party: ha ha ha ha as a person who has never voted for someone, but have always voted against another, I would think that such a practice would make it difficult to be a party member. I have given the DLP it’s 5 yrs to do certain things, after which and if these these things are not acted upon i will be agitating against them. But of course the degree to which i go in agitating against the DLP will be influence by whom the PM could be. 😀

    I am at my best when opposing, and i love politics. :d

  43. Adrian Hinds

    Anon 27
    August 27, 2008 at 12:43 pm
    As usual Adrian, you always seem to just miss the point or perhaps you contive to miss the point. I in no way in my original post made the claim that American television programs and in particular, documentary type programs, were “enlightening”.
    What I did say was that through viewing this type of programming, one could observe how education has faltered in the U.S. One only has to view the average American (lower to middle class) to see their poor use of language, lack of creative thinking and their inability to reason in a logical manner. Are you the average American Adrian?
    ==================================

    I don’t think i missed your point, I think i discovered the one that you thought was somewhat hidden. 😀

    It is somewhat boring to take a subset of 300 million people to make your point and then relabel said point as “American”. what!, similar cannot be said about a subset of Canadians, Barbadians, or the British? Poor Language my !@#% . By any fair and nonpartisan measurement one can easily conclude that creativity is in more of an abundance in the US than in Liberal Canada.

    ……I can easily suggest the point and present evidence to validate it, that anyone who views and digest the contents of any documentary in fact anything on Television without considering the possible agenda, and ideological view point of the producer, lacks creativity themselves.

    ….and yes i see myself as average American.

  44. Adrian Hinds

    Tony Hall
    August 27, 2008 at 1:15 pm
    “I have lived in the US for 15 years and my Fish-cakes and Bajan accent continues to be a hit with all the Americans i associate with. Must be the people you hang out with. Could be that in NY city where there is a multitude of cultures that you are experiencing your difficulties, they may not be as American as you think.”

    Adrian,
    You obviously weren’t paying attention to what I wrote. I made my comments based on persons who live in the midwest and south who have racist attitudes as a result of total ignorance. I never said I had any difficulties. New York is a melting pot and opportunies are here for one to be exposed to different cultures.
    ===================================

    The truth: Barack Obama won the Iowa causcus. Iowa is 90 percent White. Where is Iowa?

    Don’t believe me watch Obama’s Iowa victory speech.

  45. Adrian Hinds

    ru4real
    August 27, 2008 at 12:50 pm
    I dont think that Obama will face any more threats than any other President of the USA.
    They all face the danger of assassination.
    For any leading public figure its a known risk.

    These two (above) dont look as if they could cross the road on their own.
    =================================

    No way, the word “assassination” has only entered the US media vocabulary since Obama became a Presidential candidate. 😀

  46. Adrian Hinds

    Tony Hall. Obama won in Iowa which is considered Midwest and is 90% white, he lost in Massachusetts, where the previous year a dark skin governor was unanimously elected (winning in all voting districts), he lost in ultra liberal Rhode Island, and in your New York, yet you call Iowans (Midwest) racist. Why ignore facts to the contrary?

    I am posting all of this because, even as you refuse to let us in on the real motive for your position and opinions on racism in the south and Midwest as such would pertain to Obama and his electability, Um showing right through. 😀

    Obama is too socialist for me. I have left such politicians behind in Barbados. I have seen what they cannot and will not do. He does not get my vote.

  47. .36

    From the misty peaks of Roraima and the majestic falls at Kaieteuir in the land of the mighty Essequibo the great people of Guyana send all their votes to Senator Barack Obama the next leader of the free world and the USA.

  48. WildyCoyte.

    Americans have been effectively disenfranchised. They get to vote for the Neo-Con of their choice. Obama’s logo is the familiar Illuminati dot in circle & rising sun motif. His motto “Change” as in “change the world” has always been the Left battle cry. The change is to enslavement. George Soros financed Obama in his 2004 Senate race and this Rothschild cut-out is backing him again.

    Meanwhile Randy Scheunemann is John McCain’s chief foreign policy adviser. He has also worked for the Republic of Georgia and for, yup, none other than George Soros’ Open Society Policy Center. (See his Wikipedia entry.) So you see both sides are beholden to the Rothschilds.

    In addition, McCain has been accused of taking improper donations from the Rothschilds.
    Yes folks, Americans have been disenfranchised. But then, slaves always are.

    A GUIDE FOR THE BEDEVILED

    Our political life is a grotesque carnival designed to convince the rubes they live in a democracy. This is so they will pay taxes and lay down their lives for their betters.

    Our rulers have determined that we shall have no real say in our collective future. Like livestock, we will chew our collective cud on sex, drugs, toys and trivia, which they will supply in abundance.

    This explains why the mass media (incl. movies) and education long ago ceased to deal in reality, or teach civics or history. Instead they are purveyers of deception and conformity.

    The US election is really a job competition where a shortlist of candidates vie for the privilege of deceiving the public and implementing the banker agenda. Even this process is fixed, as the bankers naturally prefer the most corrupt and dissolute and therefore most blackmail-able and obedient leader.

    There hasn’t been a President in the last 100 years who hasn’t been controlled by the Rothschilds via the Rockefellers. The ones that resisted were poisoned (Harding); murdered (JFK) or framed (Nixon.)

    The bankers use the US as the Zionist half of their dialectic leading to world government. At the same time, the US is weakened so it can be properly submerged.

    Our world is a B-movie Horror where the town’s leading citizens secretly join a satanic cult and betray everybody else. This is essentially the position of people who align themselves with the central bankers, which is a prerequisite for success in most fields today.

    This is why so many of our “leaders” are drunks and perverts. They have sold their souls to the devil and know it.

    I said all that to say this…no matter who wins..the Rothschilds have Americans by the B@LLs.

  49. Adrian Hinds

    WildyCoyte. Why take small truths and lump them into some wild scare mongering conspiracy?

    Yes i do believe that Bankers control this country, and that economic growth rest percariously on consumer spending and taking on debt. New money comes from somebody else’s debt, but are you saying that all people are powerless against the few bankers and that we must continue to spend and take on debt?

    ….I say it matters who win. For with Barack and in spite of his promise last night to cut taxes for 95% of Americans, he repesents big government and big government must be paid for by taxes. He lambasted “trickle down economics” and some how thinks that too increase taxes on the one or two percent wealthiest Americans who are the oweners of commerce will not also be past down to us. Obama in addition to trickle down economics there has always been trickle down tax requirements. A tax on the rich is a tax on all of us.

  50. Adrian Hinds

    betta behave maself
    August 31, 2008 at 7:54 am

    I have n’t finished reading the all the comments, yet, but thank Adrian, if he was seeking to defend me!! We shall speak again, no doubt, bro!!
    =================================

    BBM aka Bimbro, I got your back this time man. BFP can’t be bajans if they don’t practice what are known bajan past-times of vicitmization, censorship etc. Don’t foget that banning is an integral part of our calypso season. 😀 You should find some comfort the following article

    “A model democracy?
    Published on: 8/31/08.

    by ALBERT BRANDFORD,
    Political Correspondent
    BARBADIANS need to reject the “groundless assumption and perception” that their island nation is an advanced or model democracy.
    And a working paper out of the Faculty of Social Sciences of the St Augustine Campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI) has urged “critical self-reflection” by civil society on its own level of vigilance on breaches of the democratic order.
    “Indeed, there is little evidence that such an overturning of that perception is likely,” the paper said, “particularly since there was much self-congratulation and breast-beating on what was perceived to be yet further evidence of Barbados’ political maturity given the relatively peaceful and unproblematic transition to the new [Democratic Labour Party] Government [on January 15].”
    Victimisation
    “Ironically, this self-congratulation appeared untroubled by reports of political victimisation following the election, and allegations of vote buying during the poll.”
    These views are contained in Model Democracy Or Groundless Complacency?: An Exploration Of Democracy And Governance In Barbados Around The Issues Of The 2008 General Election – Working Paper #1, August 1, 2008, by Dr Tennyson Joseph and Cynthia Barrow-Giles, political science lecturers at the UWI’s Cave Hill Campus.
    The authors sought to identify the extent to which Barbados adhered to the critical democratic indicators which they used in their 2004 study for Transparency International on National Integrity Systems (NIS) in several Eastern Caribbean countries.
    They noted that while the questions were aimed at identifying indicators of corruption, the research yielded some major implications for the state of democracy in the islands.
    “The significance of the findings for Barbados lay principally in the fact that some of the findings deviated in many instances from the widely held perception of Barbados as a model democracy, with a long tradition of parliamentary democracy, a highly educated and civic-minded public, the absence of unconstitutional interruptions in Government, and with a political culture conducive to political and social stability,” the researchers said.
    “On many of the critical issues examined, Barbados seemed to lag behind insofar as the existence of institutional mechanisms to safeguard and protect democracy were concerned.”
    Striking absence
    They pointed to the “striking” absence of integrity legislation,but were equally concerned about the attitude of Barbadians to the existing state of affairs: the widely held perception that the island was an advanced democracy, “which in itself was manifested in a reduced vigilance insofar as their alertness towards possible erosions of democratic practice and behaviour is concerned”.
    “It is this tendency that we have described as “groundless complacency”, they added.
    The authors said a second attitude was the presence of a “culture of fear” of victimisation, notably among public servants but also prevalent among the wider populace, including practitioners in the media.
    “This ‘culture of fear’ was manifested largely in the reluctance to engage in whistle- blowing, to demand and advocate for greater institutionalisation of democratic institutions and to speak openly on political issues.
    Contradictions
    “Ironically, one of the contradictions which emerged is the fact that the ‘culture of fear’ resided happily alongside the perception of Barbados as a model democracy.”
    The researchers suggested that the “culture of fear” found “bolder expression” during the January general election.
    “Quite significantly,” they said, “this notion of a culture of fear was manifested in the adoption of a policy of so-called ‘self-censorship’ among established media houses, which involved the suspension of contributions, during the election period, of established columnists which were classified as ‘political writers’.
    “Similarly, contributors to the weekly [radio] call-in programmes were routinely cut off once their voices and comments were perceived by the producers as being too ‘political’ in tone and content.”
    Prompted by the 2004 NIS survey findings as well as the democracy-related issues during the January campaign, the researchers sought to make a connection between the two apparently unrelated periods of inquiry.
    The researchers felt that though the absence of integrity legislation here was striking, of greater concern was the general lack of interest and appreciation of the importance of such legislation in bolstering the democratic character of the society.
    “Combined with the absence of conflict of interest rules for parliamentarians and more specifically Cabinet Ministers, the absence of integrity legislation suggested a significant gap in the democratic institutional framework of the country,” they added.
    “It is this tendency which, more than anything else, has led to our characterisation of the notion of ‘complacency’ as a feature of the democratic culture of Barbados.”
    They also examined political party financing – Barbados’ rules on election financing are extremely limited and do not directly address fundraising by political parties.
    On the public procurement regime, they found there were clear rules with respect to competitive bidding for all major procurement but that there was sufficient credible evidence to suggest the rules were not always observed.
    The authors said timeliness of the submissions of the reports of the Auditor-General of Barbados was more encouraging than that of several other Caribbean territories, but felt the island’s weaknesses jumped to the fore on the issue of the functioning of the Public Accounts Committee.
    It was their examination of the role and functioning of the media, however, that provided them further indication that assumptions of Barbados’ development of a mature democratic environment “might be overstated”.
    They noted the constutitional right to freedom of expression (with certain limitations), but with no direct reference to freedom of the Press.
    “Whilst this might suggest a mature democratic environment, it is in the conduct of the media in Barbados than one can see most clearly a gap between the actual practice and the existing institutional framework,” the authors said.
    Censorship
    Without supplying any supporting evidence, the researchers declared that the January general election “provided several instances which may support the claim that actual censorship of the media is a greater reality in Barbados than has been openly acknowledged”.
    They suggested, significantly on the question of libel and defamation laws, that there was a perception among media workers in Barbados that the Defamation Act was too restrictive.
    According to them, while there was consultation with media houses prior to passage, none of the recommendations was accepted.
    “It is the view of the journalist interviewed [Harold Hoyte, former publisher of THE NATION] that not only are the libel laws punitive but the records of the courts were also punitive since both the sanctions are high and the terms of what is defamatory restrictive.
    “The publisher of THE NATION newspaper estimated that it is normal for the newspaper to pay about $100 000 in damages annually,” they said. “It is therefore quite easy for public officials to censor the Press merely by threatening to sue.”
    Compounded
    The UWI researchers felt this punitive and restrictive environment was further compounded by the absence of a Freedom of Information Act, which was exacerbated by the colonial-era Official Secrets Act and the Staff Orders of the Civil Service, while additional weaknesses included Government owning the lone TV station.
    But they noted that whereas the “spread” of radio ownership was fairly wide, the evidence of greater censorship was more apparent here than in other Eastern Caribbean states.
    Another indicator of democratic culture and practice, the researchers said, was the vigilance of civil society, but they noted there was none here with the specific role of addressing corruption.
    They concluded that the general tendency was for potentially anti-governmental civic bodies to be absorbed into quasi-government frameworks which limited their capacity for independent action.

    Nationnews.com

  51. ILLUMINATOR

    I find it very strange that ‘Green Monkey’ has highlighted a REAL civil case that shows the US government was complicit in the murder of Martin Luther King and no one has found it fit to comment. An actual case not some conspiracy theory , yet its a little known fact . It also shows that which not meant to be public consumption wont be , vice versa… that which is….well u get the picture
    Yet most actually think that Barack Obama is going to bring about some miraculous change to the path of the said same US, unbelievable.

  52. Rumplestilskin

    WildyCoyote,

    Thanks, enjoyed that tremendously and it will spur thought in those who are naive enough to think that a large and ‘great’ association does not exist for the purpose of control.

    It does.

    Like those in the resistance in WW2, we work ever so subtly against such manipulation, but it is not easy.

    The deliberatly increased real estate values, unjustificable by market forces and unjustifiable by building costs, has been a recent tool at debt enslavement.

    This is the real cause of the economic panic, that such increases were completely baseless and the ‘commoners’ really cannot afford the demands set by the elite, to pay such atrocious proces for a box on a small piddle of land.

    The house of cards is almost falling, held by a thread.

    Peace.