Barbados National Trust Votes To Leave Nelson’s Statue Where It Is

Yesterday, Wednesday, July 23, 2008, Prime Minister Thompson spoke at the the 48th Annual General Meeting of the Barbados National Trust.

The PM took some surprising positions, speaking favourably about the 2003 Amended Physical Development Plan passed by the previous Arthur/Mottley BLP Government. (!) This is especially interesting because Mr. Thompson as then-leader of the Opposition walked out during the discussion and subsequent vote concerning the plan.

Perhaps now that the corrupt piggies in the DLP have control of the development, they have persuaded the Prime Minister that the plan is excellent if the DLP instead of the BLP are now able to profit from it.

Of course, Barbados has no laws against a government official – elected or appointed – profiting on the side from their office. That was in the Ministerial Code that David Thompson promised to adopt from the day he was sworn in, but failed to do so when an internal rebellion in the party forced him to put aside the idea of integrity, transparency and accountability legislation. (ITAL)

Richard Goddard – We Need A Dozen More Like Him

Also at the meeting, our old friend Richard Goddard upset or pleased more than a few folks when he proposed four resolutions, including that Admiral Nelson’s Statue should remain right where it is. That proposal was approved by a majority of those present.

You can read a first hand account of the meeting (with photo) at Keltruth Blog’s Barbados National Trust Discusses Controversial Issues After PM Thompson Speaks

Advertisements

65 Comments

Filed under Barbados, History, Political Corruption, Politics, Politics & Corruption

65 responses to “Barbados National Trust Votes To Leave Nelson’s Statue Where It Is

  1. degap

    “Massa’s day not done?”

    Down with Nelson; up with Barrow! If Goddard and his ilk want to see Nelson, they are free to go to England.

    ****************

    BFP says,

    Bonjour! Weeeeethout zee Nelson, weeeeeeeee zeee peeeepols of zeee Barbados, whould, How you say? Aw Oui!…. we would alllll be speaking the Francois! Neessst Pas?

  2. Donald Duck, Esq

    Physical Development plan 2003 was formulated on the basis that there will be 45,000 acres in agriculture. PM Thompson signed off on it. However in the DLP throne speech, there was mention of 30,000 acres being kpet in agriculture!!!

    Can anyone explain the difference???

    In addition, while in the political wilderness the DLP said that all permissions for change of use of land would have to be approved by parliament. This was later modified to parliament being only notified of the change of use. Recently this was modified to the point where only where the area being changed is over 100 acres. What a change? Any explanations!!!

  3. Mathilde

    The only way I would want to replace Nelson is if we could get some one with SOME idea of how anatomy works. sorry but the other statues are OOGLY – The Garfield Sobers one isnt too bad. plus I like the green of the statue now too. I also would rather a PRETTY statue with some representation of freedom or whatever floats your boat, rather than yet another stiffly standing politician. maybe and image of a dancer, or a bird or something. we have NO public art in this country!! the closest we have is the lion at Gun Hill 😛

    p.s. French people a whole lot more racist on teh whole than the Brits….

  4. Thistle

    BFP: You stated: “Perhaps now that the corrupt piggies in the DLP have control of the development …”

    You have proof that they are corrupt? If so, what proof? Give them a break, BFP! I am not saying for one moment that some of them won’t be corrupted eventually – I would have to be a blind idiot! – but after just a few months in office? I think not. You are definitely jumping the gun.

    **************

    BFP says,

    Over 6 months in office and Thompson has been unable to adopt a policy that government employees cannot issue contracts to immediate relatives or companies that they have an interest in.

    Speaks for itself.

    No other explanation is necessary.

  5. Tony Hall

    BPF,
    You are definitely jumping the gun. How can you in all honesty call persons corrupt in 7 months? Do you have any evidence? Do some research before making such statements.

  6. Kay

    How would this generation that wishes to see Nelson removed feel about a future generation tearing down Sir Grantly, Sir Gary or The Emancipation Statue. We need to realise that we can not change history by pulling down statues, they are there as reminders of our heritage, that we should see, ask questions and learn from the past.

  7. BFP for next B'dos. Gov't.!

    Tony H,
    You need to understand that BFP is incurably perfectionist and idealistic.
    They intend to hold Barbados politicians to BEYOND-Danish standards!

    Exactly how this is to be established in an Afro-Caribbean Turd World island-dot
    is beyond most of us
    and yet still they admirably hold to their idealism
    …nothing wrong in that..just don’t realistically expect it to happen anytime soon.

    I was speaking with someone last night
    who was saying that they’ve now become quite turned-off by BFP’s sanctimonious stance of late.

    Guys, just be glad we have a change of Government!
    It’s not prefect -never shall be
    – unless BFP itself forms the next Government.

    Campaign promises and Manifesto mutterings are just that -“what you wanted to hear” -as always!

    It’s a little game we play…it’s called Politricks.
    We all know how it works/doesn’t!

  8. Eddie - Why tear down?

    Kay, I agree with you to the point where you mentined: “How would this generation that wishes to see Nelson removed fell about a future generation teaing down Sir Grantly, Sir Garry or the Emancipation Statue” (Why not call it Bussa, it’s correct name?)

    The only way a new generation would ever “think”
    about tearing down Statues of indigenous Barbadians is if there were a serious change in the Sociological mix of this society.

    However, I agree with you on your major point. Tearing down Nelson makes no sense; it cannot erase what happened in the past.
    In fact, i believe Nelson is in the correct spot. It shows a part of our history that we have by blood, sweat, tears and the power of God, overcome.

    Unlike many of the contributors to this press who engage in these types of topics (hiding behind strange pseudonyms) – I am Black – Jet Black!

  9. 316.89

    Those of us ‘close to the source’
    know a lil something about what was found in the Treasury.
    Not much apart from a bare concrete floor.
    i.e. an AWFUL lotta debt!!

    This new DLP government has inherited a nasty economic situation.
    We warned them -be careful what you pray for
    -you might just get it?

    Wellll..they got it!! and it’s NOT pretty
    and they are ketchin dey axx just to keep this country afloat while avoiding undesirable stuff like the IMF
    and devaluation of our precarious Dollar!

    The long list of minuses is such that
    it’s going to take a few years well
    before we get back to a balance of ZERO
    far less into the plus column,okay?
    Patience is what is needed now.

  10. 329.184.83.168

    Lord Nelson’s statue in Barbados
    was erected by black Bajan sweat and toil
    (albeit under the instruction of white Colonials!)

    The statue was also funded by a fair bit of black Bajan economic contribution
    so it would be a downright insult to the Bajans(all colours!) of the 1830s
    to do away with a statue that they put there, both monetarily and physically!!

    Leff de man whuh-part he is!

  11. Bystander

    Nelson ain’t going anywhere. He is the true national hero to those that matter …. the british tourists and west coast property owners!

    Thompson has fallen in line nicely. Life will continue as normal i.e like before 15th Jan and I am relieved that Bajan sense has prevailed.

  12. crossroads

    Leave Nelson right where he is, its part of our history and no one can change that.

  13. reality check

    Nelson took a bullet and died for his nation.

    Our leaders take offshore bank accounts and retire to luxury on a non tax basis.

  14. Rumplestilskin

    Leave Nelson where he is.

    However, in recognition of forebears who laid down their lifeblood for the economic benefit of the island and even the Britain, in recognition of the significant input that women have had and continue to have as the mainstay of Barbadian families, as the nurturers of the young and thus the basis for our future;

    How about a statue of a proud and beautiful Barbadian woman, to greet visitors at the far most entrypoint to the Port, standing tall with her head high?

    A suitable ‘art subject’ for this may be the last Miss Barbados, for example, who herself represents intelligence and beauty.

    How about it then?

  15. Rumplestilskin

    PS – I do mean Ms.Garner.

  16. Kay

    Or Rachel Pringel. But the residents put up the money for the Nelson statue, the government only gave the land. We should follow their example.

  17. cynty

    I agree to leave Nelson where he is, you can’t change history, an ‘art’ statue already here? that hideous thing in Rock Hall, looks terrible, we don’t want anything else like that!

  18. Backooman

    What happen to BFP though? u cant find any topics on your own? To me it seems that u are always pulling stories from keltruth.Is this your sister blog?Maybe tryin to give kel some badly needed publicity.
    For me Nelson should stay where he is.People travel the whole world to India(mostly hindu) to see a building (the Taj Mahal) built by a muslim king.
    New York most famous landmark-Statue of liberty- is in fact french made and given to u.s.a by the french as a gift! so much for history and what happened in the past.

  19. CENTIPEDE

    Not only is Nelson a part of our history that you can’t change or obliterate… ‘Trafalgar Square’ is not a suitable location for ‘Heroes Square.’

    Government would do well to find a more suitable spot.

  20. Mathilde

    i would happily design a nice statue, i cant make one but i can draw it and make sure it doesnt come out looking like an alien with a big head… and Rumplestilskins idea for the location isnt bad either.
    we’ve had so many chances to beautify the ugly but necessary part of our island, and each time we’ve botched the job, I would have loved a long line of trees planted in the middle of the highways instead of that concrete wall. it would add some shade in traffic and be pretty! and then there is the lack of public art.. no fountains, no pretty statues… maybe im just a dreamer…

  21. Bystander

    Mathilde, you are a dreamer. The majority of Bajans have no appreciation for art nor the concept of aesthetically pleasing public spaces. Now pubic spaces that is their forte.

  22. Peltdownman

    As usual, the spineless National Trust has pushed controversial resolutions away from the AGM, into committee, just as politicians do with controversial legislation. Then it will be forgotten, and debate will be stifled. They did this to Richard Goddard once before when he tried to get the National Trust AGM to vote on a resolution against placing a dump at Greenland. They (the board led by Paul Altman)then pushed it out of the AGM, by offering the resolution to the whole membership for a vote, including those not present
    at the AGM. To this day I doubt if such a move was legal, as the AGM is the supreme authority. But it did the trick. The controversy was pushed away and the real estate developers that make up the backbone of the NT were happy. The President had carried out his instructions from above.

  23. Peltdownman

    I forgot to mention that in the following year, they bussed-in the blue rinse brigade and voted Richard Goddard off the board. Job complete!

  24. 451.56

    Bystander says… “Now pubic spaces
    that is their forte.”

    Indeed.. pubic spaces is exactly the right level!

  25. My main contention with moving Nelson is – WHO will pay? Not me as a taxpayer! So leave it right there, you don’t like it there? You are not ordered to look in that direction…

    BFP, the French talk for accepting Nelson is a bit mild, for that matter English may not have happened in this hemisphere since in one of the earliest Congressional meetings of the then 13-member USA was to decide the official language…

    English/Yankee as official lingo beat out the other choice of German/Deutsche by only a single, solitary vote. So in theory, the US very nearly made it easier for Hitler to invade this side during WW2

  26. Georgie Porgie

    What is wrong with Nelson?
    It is a national landmark.
    Why move him, just like you destroy all the memories of Kensington Oval?

  27. Historian

    BFP you been at the rum shop again? A reminder that Spanish ships were also at the battle called Trafalgar which was fought off the coast of Spain?

    If Nelson had lost maybe we’d be Spaniards.

  28. Fool me once

    For those who want to topple Nelson’s statue and remove him from our history we say why stop there?

    Kick all the Brits out of the country too. Make them take their money home. Also Europeans, Yankees, Canucks.

  29. degap

    The decrepit Lord Nelson is a vestige of the white slaveholders. The erection of the statue had nothing to do with black Bajans. They neither paid for nor consented to the erection of this woefully out of place reminder of colonial white stupidity.

  30. John

    degap

    Did you know that Nelson saved Africa from French invasion? …. Check the Battle of the Nile.

    Did you also know that there were hundreds of Barbadian slaves who took the name Horatio, or Nelson or both, and thousands in the British Dependencies as well? …… Check Ancestry.com

    Not only did slaves choose to call themselves after Nelson but also free people as well, … and throughout the world, even in America where Nelson had fought to prevent American Independence from Britain. …. Check familysearch.org.

    … and some families continued the use of Nelson or Horatio as a christian name for generations, even going to the extent of naming females Nelson!!

    These simple facts can be verified on the internet and reveal the extent to which we have been hoodwinked by our historians.

    Where do you think Nelson Mandela’s parents got his christian name from … more than a century after Trafalgar?

  31. ROGL

    You said it! – “Kick all the Brits out of the country too.
    Make them take their money home.
    Also Europeans, Yankees, Canucks.”

    Yes I agree.
    Let’s kick out
    not just the Brits, but all whites and non-blacks! even the high-browns!
    Anyone who isn’t pearly black is OUT.
    get all that nasty foreign money out of our burgeoning economy!

    Then we can get on with the business of getting dis place ‘back to Africa’ fer real
    ..something that can’t be done as long as we have any civilizing influence here!
    Good Luck guys!

  32. ROGL

    Hilary has done his hateful work so well..

  33. Brutus

    From Wikipedia:

    “At seven years of age, Rolihlahla Mandela became the first member of his family to attend a school, where he was given the name “Nelson”, after the Admiral Horatio Nelson of the Royal Navy, by a Methodist teacher who found his native name difficult to pronounce.”

  34. degap

    Lord Nelson didn’t save Barbados or Africa from anything! His only accomplishment was the preservation of Anglo Saxon supremacy full stop. Again black Bajans were not consulted (that peculiar institution was still in full force) and the first colored MP was still some three decades away. That prominent position should be reserved for the Rt Hon Errol Walton Barrow, QC, ONH, the father of our nation.

  35. Bystander

    They should put up a statue of Ossie Moore or Gearbox. These true and genuine national heroes whose work was so representative of modern Barbados, should not be forgotten.

  36. John

    degap
    July 25, 2008 at 1:51 pm
    Lord Nelson didn’t save Barbados or Africa from anything!
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++

    It’s a historical fact that Nelson destroyed the French Fleet in Aboukir Bay, Egypt, on the night of August 1st 1798.

    It’s a historical fact that this fleet had convoyed an army of 38,000 french soldiers under Napoleon to invade Egypt.

    It’s a historical fact that Napoleon’s army of invasion defeated the Mamelukes of Egypt at the Battle of the Pyramids a few days earlier.

    Come August 1st, not only can we celebrate Emancipation from slavery but we can also celebrate the deliverance of Africa from french invasion.

    One of these years when we figure it out we should consider a walk from the Emancipation Statue to Nelson’s Statue on August 1st.

    I have always wondered why August 1st was chosen as Emancipation Day by the British Parliament. I suspect Nelson may have had something to do with it.

    ….. even Haiti owes much to Nelson, … as does the US … for Louisiana.

    Nelson’s impact on World History was phenomenal.

    We are fortunate to have one of three memorials erected in his honour.

    Here is a worthwhile link.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Nile

    Nelson died at Battle of Trafalgar, but Battle of The Nile is the victory that made his name and promoted him to Admiral and in command of the British Fleet at Trafalgar.

  37. John

    Nelson also has yet another important link to Africa.

    In 1799, when digging fortifications at Rosetta in Egypt to defend against the British, the French unearthed what became to be known as “The Rosetta Stone”.

    It took years to decypher but this stone and what was written on it allowed Egyptian hyrogliphics to be read and allow us today to fully appreciate the wonders of past Egyptian civilisations.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosetta_Stone

    The French forces stranded in Egypt after the Battle of the Nile were finally defeated by a British Army under Abercromby and returned to France.

    Napoleon had abandoned them and reached France earlier where he took power.

    Directly or indirectly, Nelson’s impact on World History is great. Small wonder people all over the world named their offspring after him.

    Barbados is no exception.

  38. Kay

    I repeat, we should not pull down statues put up by those who went before. Nelsons statue was paid for not out of the public purse, but by private contribution and therefore if it is pulled down to make way for another figure I hope that all the people who wish it removed will pay for the one to replace it.
    The last government that moved it, turned it around and they were shortly out of office, maybe Nelson has had more victories posthumously.
    The next one moved Sir Gary, and World Cup was not the resounding success that was hoped for.
    Learn from history.

  39. ru4real

    ROGL

    Then we can get on with the business of getting dis place ‘back to Africa’ fer real
    ..something that can’t be done as long as we have any civilizing influence here!
    Good Luck guys!
    —————————————–

    I would take a long look at Africa first.

  40. degap

    John,
    Lord Nelson actually made his reputation in Antigua and the Leeward islands. I’m not debating his battles. Slavery was abolished in Barbados in 1838. Lord Nelson didn’t save us from anything. I wonder why the colonial gentry didn’t erect a statue of William Wilberforce?

    Kay,
    The only reason the statue was paid by private donations is because the treasury was empty! The red legs didn’t have any money, so the slaveholders would have to tax their ill-gotten gains in order to properly administer the colony. Tax receipts were kept to a minimum. How else could they keep their wives and mistresses in lace?

  41. Kay

    What and the treasury has money now to spend on a statue? That would not be better spent on health care or our aging population? Or on the children, our future?
    If the local population willingly pay for a statue then no one should second quess them. Not 300 not 1000 years later.

  42. John

    Kay

    All four memorials including the statue of Nelson were put there by private subscription.

    They are memorials to people who lost their lives in cataclysmic events that threatened to destroy Barbados.

    Since the second world war there have been no events which required the sacrifice of life and limb and the people have not had to erect memorials to those who gave their lives.

    None of our ten National Heroes, appointed for us by our Government, actually lost their life, in fact, one is still alive.

    Besides the fact that it is the people, not the Government of the day, that erected those memorials, the memorials are for people who actually died in a cause.

  43. revisionism

    “degap”

    someone hasn’t seen the old photograph of all the local black bajans celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar?

    Maybe they were all driven to the site by plantocracy at rifle point? I could have sworn the look on their faces was that of joy and celebration?.

    Talk about historical revisionism worthy of Communist Russia or the Nazis..

    Degap must be a UWI graduate?

  44. Bystander

    John wrote – “None of our ten National Heroes, appointed for us by our Government, actually lost their life, in fact, one is still alive.”

    So Bussa got a pension when he retired?

  45. Bystander

    “Revisionism” re: centenary of Trafalgar.

    When I was a very young child I believed in santa claus! I grew up and now, I only believe in the Easter Bunny.

  46. Bystander

    On reflection if Nelson had lost, B’dos would have been taken over by France and we would now be part of the EU…. Bring the bulldozers and let’s get that one eye, one arm SOB down now! We could have been part of the developed world instead of hoping to be so by 2020 (or is it 3020?)!

  47. John

    Bystander
    July 26, 2008 at 12:35 am
    John wrote – “None of our ten National Heroes, appointed for us by our Government, actually lost their life, in fact, one is still alive.”

    So Bussa got a pension when he retired?
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    See if you can find out how Bussa died, where he died, when he died and indeed, … if he died.

    I’ve read all the Government blurb and even tried reading some historians too but one thing is missing from all of what I have read to date, the factual basis of his death!!

    I have reached the conclusion that The Right Excellent Bussa is part of an imagined persona who existed but about whom little is known.

  48. Bystander

    I visited London many years ago as a child. Went to this cathedral (can’t remember which) but there was this tomb with the memorial “The unknown soldier”. In my then childish way, I asked; Is there really the body of a soldier buried there? Maybe it was an unfortunate civilian or was it an enemy soldier? Was he brave and heroic? and so on.

    Well my father answered; There certainly had been a war. There were many casualities and it did not really matter who was buried there if anyone at all, what was important that this tragic event and the many lives affected be remembered and that the country contemplate the effects of war.

    So in coming to my conclusion about Bussa I ask; Was there a rebellion in 1816? Did it have leaders? Was there a person named Bussa? Did such rebellion affect the society in which it occurred? What were the circumstances of the rebellion of 1816?

    So we remember and contemplate. Instead of an appelation “the unknown soldier”, we have a name, Bussa. A myth you may suggest, but much, much more has been done in the name of myths. Pick any religion for example or even Nelson.

  49. John

    Bystander

    The Unknown Soldier is unknown because all that is left of him is bits and pieces and he can’t be identified.

    He isn’t unknown because he is a myth.

    The remains are real and are actually in the tomb. There may be a mixture of parts from other unknowns there as well.

    Google Unknown Soldier Identity and you will realise that with DNA it is possible to identify who the bits and pieces belonged to.

    Indeed, some unknown soldiers are now becoming known.

    I agree myths are the foundation of many customs, but Nelson was no myth.

  50. John

    … and Bystander, I can find Historians who point blank reject the leadership of Bussa and lean to Washington Pitt Franklin as being the leader and instigator.

    The point I think is that nobody knows for sure because it is now approaching 200 years since those events and Bussa, or Washington Pitt Franklin are not being seen through the eyes of their contemporaries, as were Nelson and the dead of the first and Second World War.

    If you go to the Cenotaph and pick any name, you can go to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission on the Internet and find where in the world the deceased Bajan is buried, the date of his demise and in many cases next of kin.

    The Fountain is closest to what you are describing. Cholera accounted for about 20,000 Bajans of all colours in 1854.

    The Fountain is a result of that event. It was put there by public subscription in 1861 I believe to commemorate the piping of water to Bridgetown to replace the sources that assisted in the spread of the disease.

  51. khadija

    Put lord nelson to work, he has been freeloading off Barbados for too long. inclose him, and charge a fee to photograf and see him, that money can be use in the upkeep of the squar. Nelson is a part of our HISTORY, if we like it or not. I can a nice little bussiness comming out of lord nelson, artist get busy.

  52. khadija

    Put lord nelson to work, he has been freeloading off Barbados for too long. inclose him, and charge a fee to photograf and see him, that money can be use in the upkeep of the squar. Nelson is a part of our HISTORY, if we like it or not. I can see a nice little bussiness comming out of lord nelson, artist get busy. turn the bad into good, and Profit.

  53. Bystander

    John
    There are historians who say otherwise. I am not debating whether Bussa existed or not, what I am saying is that a significant event took place in 1816. Enslaved people rose up and sought their freedom. It is that spirit of a people seeking equality and freedom I commemorate when I refer to Bussa.

    Now as to Nelson … pure myth that he did it for Barbados!

  54. reality check

    Bystander

    “When I was a very young child I believed in santa claus! I grew up and now, I only believe in the Easter Bunny”

    You forgot and Bussa

    There are many black Barbadian citizens over time, such as London Bourne, who overcame discrimination and adversity to shine and be a light to many people.

    Do we really need to create myths when we have real examples of people who have succeeded nationally and internationally and are an inspiration to all?

  55. John

    Bystander
    July 26, 2008 at 5:02 pm
    John
    There are historians who say otherwise. I am not debating whether Bussa existed or not, what I am saying is that a significant event took place in 1816. Enslaved people rose up and sought their freedom. It is that spirit of a people seeking equality and freedom I commemorate when I refer to Bussa.

    Now as to Nelson … pure myth that he did it for Barbados!
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You are speaking of the Emancipation Statue which expresses the ideals to which you refer.

    The four memorials in town are to people who actually died, and are put there based on what people living at the time knew as fact.

    Those memorials are not based on what historians surmised to have happened almost 200 years ago.

  56. ru4real

    Put lord nelson to work, he has been freeloading off Barbados for too long. inclose him, and charge a fee to photograf and see him, that money can be use in the upkeep of the squar. Nelson is a part of our HISTORY, if we like it or not. I can see a nice little bussiness comming out of lord nelson, artist get busy. turn the bad into good, and Profit.
    ——————————————————–
    Yeah great idea.
    All tourists are fools to be ripped off at all possible times.

  57. Bystander

    reality check

    London Bourne is certainly a person of great achievement. I once made the recommendation to “someone in authority” that the Cave Hill School of Business be named the London Bourne Business School! Alas, to no avail.

    What do you guys have against Bussa? He existed! There are records of what happened in 1816 by the way.

    Once you get into the Heroes Game, myth making is inevitable.

  58. John

    Bystander

    You are right about the heroes game, and it is a game.

    The four memorials were until Government started playing that game, just memorials.

    The game did not change them from being memorials, we allowed the words of a few people who chose to interpret them differently to make us think they were not.

    It is like going in a church or in a graveyard and seeing a plaque with words in memory of someone put there by a relative in the 17 or 18 hundreds.

    That person might have been a slave owner at the time but do we have the right to expect that the church should remove the plaque because it offends our sensibilities today?

    I do not think such an action would ever occur to a normal human being.

  59. Kay

    Do you realise that in Germany after the second WW people tore down everything to do with Hitler and now they are regretting it. Not because they have suddenly decided that they admire Hitler.
    John was correct in his last comment.
    If we all start tearing down things that offend our sensibilities where will we draw the line. We will just end up with a pile of rubble and use up our energy destroying rather than building.

  60. Maat

    A mature nation does not need to have irrelevant statues adorning their landscape.

    Most of the British people that I know are surprised that a monument to a British naval officer that had disparaging things to say about a fellow Brit (namely William Wilberforce) and Wilberforce’s position on the abolition of slavery, would hold such a prominent position in a nation born out of slavery.

    No other Caribbean island has a memorial to Nelson, because they do not believe the myth that he saved us from the French. When Nelson was sunning his buns on the deck of his ship off the island of Barbados, the French fleet was up near Martinique. By the time Nelsons crew had infected the local women with all kinds of STD’s and headed North for this ‘act of salvation,’ the French were already on their way back to France.

    To try to link the battle of the Nile and the salvation of Africa is like linking a kick in the head to a kick in the balls. Neither is helpful or to the benefit of the person getting kicked.

    The point is that the white colonialist Europeans were/are like a pack of dogs that are willing to fight over property that they steal. They have absolutely no shame and as thieves there is no honour among them.

    Talk to some serious unbiased historians about the activities and attitude of Nelson. Think about why the celebration of Trafalgar day was stopped after independence.

    Some people need to take their heads out of other peoples pooch, wipe the shite out of their eyes and ears and think for themselves.

    Stop jumping on the bandwagon to nowhere.

    Yes Kay, Hitler is relevant to Germans but he is not relevant to Barbados nor is Nelson. And yes we should tear down those things that offend our sensibilities, and rebuild them with uplifting, relevant and meaningful things.

    Europeans have this thing about art, which is nearly always meaningless. It is labelled art for arts sake. There is a higher form, it is called art for the sake of life.

    Peace

  61. ru4real

    Europeans have this thing about art, which is nearly always meaningless. It is labelled art for arts sake. There is a higher form, it is called art for the sake of life.

    —————————————————-

    Bollocks!
    Art is not confined to Europeans .
    All ancient civilizations have wonderful examples of art .
    Its a sign of civilization.

  62. Kay

    Well Maat I have no experience with having my head in anyones’ pooch, I will have to bow to your superior knowledge on that one. Nor do I really care about what your British friends think about Barbados having a statue of Nelson. But if this country removes Nelson on the basis that he is irrelevant, then we should not be surprised if the statues that are erected are treated with total disrespect.
    Just as a matter of interest Antigua has Nelson’s Dockyard, I wonder if Antiguans are trying to get that name changed? Maybe some blogger out there may know?

  63. Wry Mongoose

    “The Fountain is closest to what you are describing. Cholera accounted for about 20,000 Bajans of all colours in 1854. ”

    On the subject of the Cholera Epidemic: what about the Moravian Rev. James Edghill, risking his life performing last rites on his stricken compatriots, while other ‘men of the cloth’ were reluctant to do so.

    Was this not heroism? Then again, the Rev. Edghill was white and not a politician – so I suppose he is doubly disqualified.

  64. art

    art tells you that you could think to build bigger ones behind and around Nelson. Much bigger, much taller, all with merit, all with fault.

    Meaningful is in the eyes of the creator, n’est ce pas? We the beholders are merely one interpretation each?

    What is racism? I interpret it is to categorise derisively by the grouping.

    You may brand a colour, a group, a nationality. It is all racism.. just from different perspective.

  65. Maat

    My point exactly RU4REAL, ancient civilisations undertook the higher art form called art for life’s sake. Their carvings, ornaments and other artifacts described and enhanced their physical and spiritual lifestyles and cultures.
    What does the Mona Lisa do for you?

    Peace