Misleading Headlines In The Barbados Advocate

Regular BFP reader and commenter Bush Tea wrote the following and sent it to us for publication. BFP has not edited the article at all…

I may be picky, or just plain paranoid, but I have noticed that the Barbados Advocate News has developed the practice of featuring the worse of crime in the Caribbean in their daily editions and they do it in a way that, unless you read the full article, and are knowledgeable of the region, you could easily assume that the situation was a local one.

Now I ask myself why a local newspaper would do this.

Barbados makes a living from tourism. Many of our visitors come here because of the low crime, welcoming nature of the people and friendly, safe environment.

Persons interested in visiting obviously do research- they read the local newspapers, surf the web and so on. It is bad enough that our local crime situation is as bad as it is, but now potential tourist will conclude that it is 2000 times worse based on these ridiculous ‘news’ items out of Jamaica, Guyana and Trinidad in particular.

Even in the event that such GORY ‘news’ is worthy of such prominence in a Newspaper in a tourist destination, every other newspaper – even the BLP Nation, places a subheading on the article to clearly indicate the source of the news. (Georgetown, Guyana –October 15) I find it interesting that the Advocate fails to do so.

But then again, this newspaper is only the ‘Barbados’ advocate in that it makes its money here – like the ‘Barbados’ National Bank etc.

In the absence of any good reason to give this false impression to potential tourist and even to alarm some locals, I am forced to wonder if this is not a deliberate scheme to do harm to this country tourism – or at least to bring us down to a level footing with other destinations with which the owners of the Advocate may have stronger ties than they have with Barbados.

This practice is disrespectful, dishonest and unprofessional and I am surprised that our tourism officials have not taken steps to bring it to an end.

Thank God we have two really national news agencies – BU and BFP.

Bush Tea

13 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados News & Media, Blogging, Crime & Law, Freedom Of The Press

13 responses to “Misleading Headlines In The Barbados Advocate

  1. Anonymous

    Bush Tea,

    What sort of idiot are you?

    It is BU and BFP which try to drag Barbados through the mud every day with their non-factual idiotic postings.

    What BU and BFP offer is NOT news.

    Any Bajan who wants news about Barbados goes to the Nation, the Advocate, CBC or Voice of Barbados… the same sources where BU and BFP copy their stories from before presenting false versions on the internet.

    Idiot.

  2. Bush Tea

    Obviously I am a ‘complete idiot’ anonymous. At least I admit to being picky and paranoid… what is your excuse for replying without reading the article?

    (at least i hope that you did NOT read it otherwise i would have to resort to anti-auntie-Moses language to describe you…)

    look – get someone who can read, to read the thing for you and then see if you can come up with some relevant abuse…

    idiot..

  3. Why why

    Bush Tea, Your comments about the Advocate are spot on. I have done my part by not purchasing them.

  4. Straight talk

    Bush Tea is the sort of idiot you do not comprehend Anon.

    He has an independent mind, however you may think it is limited, it serves him well.

    I used to empathise with the possessed minds of those opposed to free thinking, idealogues faithfully spouting the party line.
    I really thought these benighted characters would one day see the light and liberate themselves from propoganda.
    Alas, after your ignoring so many instances of incompetence or worse, I have given up on you yardfowls.

    I cannot imagine your scratching a living after the next election, you all have to seek real jobs, and see how the other three quarters live … and Bush Tea will continue to give his impartial commentary on Bajan life.

    Life is so simple if you remove politics from it.

  5. theNickster

    Those headlines are there to sell papers, plain and simple. What kinds of things get people talking, cub scout helps old lady across the street? or lover’s spat ends in beheading. When that terrible accident on the west coast went down you could hardly get hands on a news paper the next day if you got to an agent to late in the morning.

    Bad news sells. Nothing more sinister than that. A blow to tourism? if the wholesale assault on the environment hasn’t bothered them, government injustices hasn’t bothered them, why should a few pictures make a difference. I’m ashamed that an opportunity to really say something of value was squandered on a brain fart. This bush tea has lost its savor.

  6. Bush Tea

    the Nickster…
    man try an see if you could read the article BEFORE you respond nuh…
    I have NO problem with BAD NEWS – on the west coast or in st lucy. I AM TALKING ABOUT BAD NEWS IN JAMAICA AND GUYANA…presented in a way that looks like it is in Barbados….
    so you don’t read the advocate either? or you just don’t read?

  7. theNickster

    To clarify:

    “I may be picky, or just plain paranoid, but I have noticed that the Barbados Advocate News has developed the practice of featuring the worse of crime in the Caribbean in their daily editions and they do it in a way that, unless you read the full article, and are knowledgeable of the region, you could easily assume that the situation was a local one.

    Now I ask myself why a local newspaper would do this.”

    Bad news sells, I’m not saying you have a problem with bad news, but this is a very reasonable answer to your question. Not defending the practice just pointing it out.

    “Barbados makes a living from tourism. Many of our visitors come here because of the low crime, welcoming nature of the people and friendly, safe environment.”

    This Barbados Advocate must have some serious clout to mess with Barbados’ living.

    “Even in the event that such GORY ‘news’ is worthy of such prominence in a Newspaper in a tourist destination, every other newspaper – even the BLP Nation, places a subheading on the article to clearly indicate the source of the news. (Georgetown, Guyana –October 15) I find it interesting that the Advocate fails to do so.”

    Shock value, quick sale. Simple as that.

    “But then again, this newspaper is only the ‘Barbados’ advocate in that it makes its money here – like the ‘Barbados’ National Bank etc.”

    What’s all the guff about tourists then?

    “In the absence of any good reason to give this false impression to potential tourist and even to alarm some locals, I am forced to wonder if this is not a deliberate scheme to do harm to this country tourism – or at least to bring us down to a level footing with other destinations with which the owners of the Advocate may have stronger ties than they have with Barbados.”

    This reasoning is a stretch, think in terms of financial gain. The object of the paper and that of other tabloids is to “sucker” someone into buying it. I am no fan of what our media has become but if those people are foolish everywhere they are not so when it comes to money. The point of business is to sell papers.

    If you see flaws in my logic, as I saw in yours with your article. Feel free to reply as you see fit.

  8. Bush Tea

    TheNickster..
    Have a good day sir…

  9. Free the Press!!!

    Say no to issuance of TV licences. Especially as election payoffs!

    Free the press!!!

    http://www.barbadosadvocate.com/NewViewNewsleft.cfm?Record=33358

    NEW LICENCES COMING soon
    Web Posted – Thu Oct 18 2007
    GOVERNMENT is considering issuing new television and radio licences in a gradual process to liberalise the market in which these media function.
    This assurance was given yesterday by Minister of State in the Prime Ministers Office, Rev. Joseph Atherley. He and Permanent Secretary in the same office, Miss Shirley Farnum,as well as Chairman of the Barbados Broadcasting Authority, Miss Lucille Moe, met the islands leading broadcasters to address operating regulations and changes in respect of licences and the relevant legal framework.

    Industry officials were heartened by Governments assurance that it was moving with dispatch to get matters finalised so as to set a new direction and new policy in terms of broadcasting, and also grant new licences.

    Present at the meeting were representatives of the Barbados Government Information Service [BGIS], an officer from the Telecommunications Unit; Barbados Broadcasting Service [BBS]; the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation [CBC]; Mix 96.9 FM; and StarCom Network Inc.

    Rev. Atherley later elaborated on issues examined at the meeting: While no decision has been taken yet as regards numbers, we are considering it, but in a context where we are looking to modernise the regulatory framework around broadcasting, both radio and television.

    Part of that backdrop also is the matter of establishing a broader policy framework with respect to related issues in Barbados. By that I mean the whole matter of public service broadcasts, the role of Government Information Service etc.

    We are also paying close attention to new emerging technologies which provide platforms for the supply of broadcasts and visual image services. It is a total framework within which we are seeking to operate, which would admit of changes occasioned by technology, which would also admit of the growing number of radio broadcast entities. There are new players coming into the field who want to broadcast to specific audiences.

    There are thematic stations coming on stream, like Love FM; entities like Globe cinema wanting to allow for broadcasts on a radio channel of their drive-in audio transmission.

    The environment is changing, and we want to be able to respond to that.

    Liberalisation in terms of television will take place, but it is not that tomorrow we will issue a licence. We will modernise the regulatory framework, broaden the policy framework within which we operate, to capture those emerging technologies and those broadcast television entities which want to be thematic and perhaps be narrowly focused in their transmissions. All of that is in the mix.

    We also want to see improved standards in the broadcast media, standards of quality, standards that relate to a value system which we share; so that it is not just the import and influx of content to the detriment and erosion of values which we have long established and held dear.

    Policy issues will address those types of things. Of course we also operate in an international environment and that has implications for radio and television broadcasting as a service. We are not immune from what is happening in the international arena.

  10. Roy Boy

    Bush Tea – I agree with your point and concern. I think it may be deeper than what “The Nickster” assumes….profits.
    My experience is that the typical behaviour of the media in tourist destinations is to minimise crime reporting except in circumstances where there is another agenda ..e.g. economic?
    I see T&T advertising its tourist industry on BBC. “where there is smoke there is fire.”
    Can anyone shed light on the various investments of the principals in the Advocate?

  11. Anonymous

    standing on 1leg while govt CONSIDERS granting new tv licen. ..
    -wait pun dah! bare talk den. typical pre-election spinshite.
    big oil find offshore(maybe) riiiight. new tv licen soon. riiiight. old age pension gyne up soon. wait pun it. foolish people believe it and like believing it. suckers all.
    is bare magic from now til elections. “you never had it so good” or better yet….”how much better-even-again it’s gonna be if blp get in again,for life” – sounds like microsoft spin almost

  12. So little said about my former friend and colleague Duncan Carter – Policeman, Cricketer, M P. More info on BLP blog.
    2. George Browne first batch and only survivor of Instructors at RPTC (1956) who suggested 50th anniversary of that Training Centre was never sent an invitation. Browne was soldier of W.India Regt., Royal British Legion (RBL) official etc. Our people should read “Cush – not cursed” from biblical point of view – no sociological. Check Dr Waldo Ramsay.

  13. gilberto eastmond

    quisiera conocer la tierra donde nacio mi abuelo que requisitos necesito soy de colombia gracias