Barbados Media: Broad Street Journal Back After Month’s Hiatus

Roads To Nowhere, Billion-Dollar Kingsland Estates Battle, Over-Spending & Fast Food Fights

After a full month with no activity at all, The Broad Street Journal Online (link here) has published three new articles – and in typical BSJ style, they are well worth reading. Here’s the links, some excerpts and our comments…

Roads And Rumours Of Roads – Excerpts

At a time when the IMF staff team is urging fiscal restraint and cutbacks in capital spending by the Arthur administration, Glyne Clarke, the minister of road works and blinking lights, is announcing new highways to nowhere.

The two new highway initiatives were deemed newsworthy enough to receive the full treatment by the Nation, which splashed the story across its front page of last Thursday…

The first two sentences in the story told us that “Barbados could have another major highway by 2010, linking Christ Church, St. George and St. Thomas” and “Additionally, consideration could be given to extending the Ermie Bourne Highway across the East coast of the island all the way to Grantley Adams International Airport.”

After those stunning revelations, the story went downhill. Turns out that both of these wonderful ideas came from (surprise!) private contractors…

Much as I enjoy playing “Let’s Come up with Things to Spend Money on in Barbados”, a slight reality check might be in order here...

…The higher your existing debt, the more risky it becomes to lend you money, and so the higher your interest rate becomes for new borrowing or to refinance old debt. Hence, the government’s growing liking for BOLT (Build, Operate, Lease and Transfer) arrangements.

We are also apparently getting our horrible new flyovers this way. More and more, as government comes under pressure to find new money for projects with a national debt that is already dangerously high, it will look to go this route. Therefore, it is not at all surprising that two new highways weighing so heavily on Mr. Clarke’s mind would have been proposed by private contractors…

Finally, just a quick note about the actual idea of linking the road … it would all, or most, be built on lands owned by Kingsland Estates Ltd. Actually, it would be built through lands once earmarked for a huge golf course and residential development project which may still have permissions granted to it by the Sandiford administration.

It just so happens that the present majority shareholder in that company long ago saw the potential for opening up these lands for residential purposes. There are over 300 hundred acres of Kingsland between Highways 5 and 4, most of it Hanson Plantation. Now, if a highway, built at government’s ultimate expense, were to run through there…

… read the full article Roads and Rumours of Roads

Mission Critical View – Excerpts

…I, though, have been burning the midnight oil reading and re-reading as much of (the latest IMF Report) as I can follow…

The long and short of it is that the IMF thinks the present administration is on the wrong path.

…Here, in my simple-minded understanding, is the reason why the present administration is not seeing eye-to-eye with the IMF: The Fund thinks we are heading for a brick wall and we should slow down quickly and turn the wheel, otherwise we will either crash head-on into it…

One of the main problems is the public debt, which the IMF puts at 82 percent of GDP …

The IMF said government should raise the VAT rate and reduce exemptions to the tax, and increase the price charged by major public enterprises, including the water and bus rates, and oil prices should be fully passed on to consumers…

Further, the IMF said that after next year, when there will be a temporary boom due to the CWC tournament, more fiscal restraint would be needed, included winding down the sugar project (you know when government says a project is going to cost ‘x’ amount, it usually means multiplied by two or three)…

Now, the whole idea is to get the public debt back down to 60 percent of GDP. The IMF says Barbados needs to get this done by 2011, while the Arthur administration says it is aiming for 2015. (Paras 21, 22). Note the dynamic here: Getting the national debt “down” to 60 percent does not mean paying it down to that level. It means doing what is necessary to get the economy to expand so that the present debt, now 82 percent of the current GDP, would, in a larger economy, only be 60% of GDP…

So the question is, how much medicine can the patient take and return to health? The government thinks that the IMF’s prescription could be detrimental to the economy’s health (and, let’s get real, even more harmful to the present administration’s own survival), so it opts for the softer approach.

Question: Is this the Arthurian version of Sandi’s “You-never-had-it-so-good” approach? Are we indeed heading for that brick wall with little chance of veering off safely? …

Whichever course you think right, it is obvious that the government has a vested interest in the kinder, gentler approach, what with an election coming up. Will Hell freeze over right after the World Cup, with the government, no matter which party comprises it, having to take major corrective action?

… Read the full article Mission Critical View

The Wind Beneath Their (Chicken) Wings – Excerpts

Once again, with clockwork predictability, the debate has started over Barbados’ fast food franchise policy.

The sides are clearly drawn, as usual: In this corner, the defending champs, the main local fast food chain and a few others (sometimes one, two or three); in the other corner, Barbadian and visiting fast food consumers, which means almost everyone else.

Over the past thirty or forty years, the ref has unfortunately been in the defending champs’ corner, so no matter how good a fight is put up by the contender (the rest of us), we always lose when the final whistle is blown, which is usually after a couple of weeks of trading bloody blows (metaphorically speaking).

Why does the consumer always lose? Well, in times past, it has been because of the defending champs pleading and lobbying for virtual monopoly status, on the grounds that they would be completely annihilated in a real war for the fast food dollar with the big fellas like MacDonald’s, Wendy’s, Burger King, etc…

… read the full article The Wind Beneath Their (Chicken) Wings

Our Take On The Broad Street Journal’s Return…

It’s great to see Patrick Hoyos back and refreshed after his vacation. Also… interesting connection between the highway proposal by Public Works Minister Gline “Still hiding behind my woman’s skirt” Clarke and the ongoing court battle over the billion – dollar Kingsland Estates lands.

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31 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Business & Banking, Offshore Investments, Politics & Corruption

31 responses to “Barbados Media: Broad Street Journal Back After Month’s Hiatus

  1. JUPITER

    Patrick Hoyos analysis and comments are as refreshing as a cold shower on a hot day.
    He breaks down economic facts and figures and makes it easy to understand.Oh how I wish he was still in charge of the Advocate,maybe we would get some true investigative journalism.

    I long for the day when we get a real nespaper and not print siutable for ‘wrapping.I long for a real radio station where callers are really allowed to tell it like it is.I wish for a real t.v. station where you get promoted and not booted off as soon as you start asking serious questions and discussing serious issues – a la Julius Gittens and the Press club – and then be replaced by your buddy that you invited to be part of the panel.

    O for brave barbadians.for patriotic whistleblowers,for genuine journalists who are willing to pay the ultimate sacrifice like that russian journalist who just died.
    Remember the saying – “Evil flourish when good men do nothing”.
    We would not have become this beautiful independent country if one man – Mr Barrow didnot decide to bite the bullet and despite limited natural resources – break ties with the mother country.
    Where would we have been without a Clement Payne,a Frank Walcott, a Wendell Mclean and I can go on and on.

    So do something good people – if you have factual information share it,if you have talent for analysing figures like Pat Hoyos – share it with the society.
    For goodness sake do something lest we all die.

  2. Carl Moore

    Good Lord, another highway! On this small island? To cut through good agricultural land? To go from St. David’s to the west coast? What for? Barbados already has too many roads which we are unable to maintain. Building more roads will not solve the problem but could actually make it worse.

    We imported $10 million in motor vehicles every month (I said every month) of last year and again this year for the first three months or so. Every day, most of those vehicles will be trying to get into Bridgetown. That’s where the traffic problem is. All roads lead to Bridgetown.

    The average driver on the ABC Highway coming in from St. Philip, St. John, St. George and Christ Church does not want to get to Speightstown; he/she is heading for the city. The average driver heading south from St. Lucy, St. Peter and St. James is not going to Grantley Adams Airport every morning; he/she is trying to reach Bridgetown.

    We have to find a way to relieve Bridgetown of some of that pressure. Building yet another high-rise carpark there seems unwise to me.

    Let’s go north and design and build another city. Think Canberra; think Brasilia; think Abouja. The Nigerians say about Abouja it’s a lot less congested, less crime ridden and less polluted than the prior capital, Lagos.

    But who am I? I’m no traffic expert or engineer.

  3. JUPITER

    To:Carl Moore

    Carl,is there anything you can do as a former journalist yourself to improve journalism in Bim.

    Could you perhaps start a blog site dealing with media coverage (or lack of coverage) of issues?Something like the press club on the internet,because we surely cannot continue like this.

  4. whatever!

    Carl,boy..
    Yuh gettin OLD.

    There are many Bajans like myself who daily CIRCUMNAVIGATE Bridgetown
    to get to/from work.
    NOT EVERYONE works in “Blessed” Bridgetown! – and not all cars hub into/out-of Bridgetown! (dat wuz long-time, muh boh!)

    I now routinely use country roads that parallel the proposed outer-ring-road,
    in my efforts to avoid the masses of un-skilled drivers clogging
    Barbados’ biggest car park,
    – THE ABC HI-WAY!

    We have no option but to build roads..new roads.
    Either THAT or we limit car imports and car possession,
    but since Gov’t. is THE biggest profiteer in the car importation business
    (200% duties and ascending!)
    there’s little chance of a limit on cars in our lifetime!

    BUILD THE ROADS.
    MORE OVERPASSES!
    MORE DUAL CARRIAGEWAY.
    PLENTY more dual carriageway!
    Or suffer the consequences!

    There IS NO “Pristine Barbados” left,
    to mess up with ‘environmentally-ugly’ things like overpasses,etc.
    And are overpasses any uglier than my house? – or your garage? or any other man-made structure on the face of the Earth???

    C’mon…the purpose of human life on Earth is to rape and ruin the planet…
    something that’s only partially accomplished.
    so let’s get on with it!

    Barbados is destined to be like Manhattan or Hong Kong within 100 yrs. so let’s get ON with it.!
    Stop skawking and pretending.

  5. Carl Moore

    “Whatever”, boy, yuh got dat right!

    I am, at 66, old in the Bajan context, but I can still think about my unborn grandchildren. I’ve always maintained that after we human beings have trashed the joint called Earth, the termites and cockroaches will inherit the place. Until then, we have to keep searching for solutions. Don’t stop me from dreaming.

    Just a few minutes ago I heard DPM Mia Mottley in the House of Assembly repeating a suggestion I made at a town meeting a few weeks ago when the Strategic Plan was being discussed at St. George’s Secondary School. It’s that we need to make Barbados bigger. Yes, reclaim land, like we did almost 50 years ago when we got an extra 90 acres to locate the Bridgetown Harbour.

    To Jupiter, I’ve been thinking along the same lines lately but I doubt if the young turks in journalism have any time for have-beens like me. Socaholism is the thing.

  6. Carl Moore

    “Whatever!”,comin’ at yuh again …

    What sensible person would go and build another high-rise parking lot in the heart of Bridgetown?

    There should be two of those structures located OUTSIDE the city — one around the Waterford-Green Hill area and the other up by the Sundown drive-in cinema.

    Now watch this: immediately, you have your park-and-ride facilities. It’s OK to park your car on Weymouth or Deacon’s pasture a Saturday to watch a 50-overs match at Kensington; but who is going to do that every day of the working week? People will want to leave their cars in safe, protected places.

    Thirty drivers coming up from the north could park in the Waterford high-rise and be driven into Bridgetown in one coach. Not a ZR van, please! Similar thing could happen in the Christ Church high-rise.

    Don’t just design the structures like the City Centre, wasting the top deck. Put a restaurant up there and an exercise facility with a walking track around the perimeter.

    Don’t talk about the views all around high above the diesel fumes on the roads below!

    Exercise freaks could return from work in the city on evenings, do some walking or jogging on the top deck, and then drive home to Crab Hill or Glenburnie. Of course, on the ground level of these structures are any number of shops and services.

    I’m not finished: Along with being the parking lots for the park-and-ride idea, these two structures will continue to earn their keep on occasions when sporting and cultural activities are taking place at the National Stadium and the Wildey district where we have cricket, swimming, tennis, hockey, football (when?) and the goings-on at the Sobers gymnasium.

    If this arrangement could accommodate photos I would’ve sent you my suggestion as to where the two carparks could be situated.

    I’m a futurist, man.

  7. John

    One possible reason for the extra highway from Christ Church to the West Coast may have more to do with the mess that has been made by the largely unplanned development of Barbados that has taken place.

    There is no Physical Development Plan approved by Parliament which anyone could pick up and follow what has happened in Barbados since Independence and predict now what will happen over the next five years.

    Here we are now speaking about ethanol plans and a 400 million (I forget the #) new sugar cane factory. But significant arable lands are in St. Lucy, St. Peter St. James and St. Andrew and produce will need to get to Buckley.. meaning the ABC highway via Warrens for the mega trucks.

    St. James, the natural catchment area for Portvale and most of St. Thomas have been removed from agriculture with no real plan as to what the result will be, apart that a few people will get rich quick.

    If we close Portvale, cane from the north will need to be transported to the Belle and then the new factory, over our pass overs and along our spanking new four lane ABC highway.

    A link from St. Thomas Church to Buckley via St. Thomas would facilitate the closure of Portvale … but to what end. The extension to St. Davids seems like it was just thrown in to give somebody more work.

    A possible use of the mooted Ermie Bourne Highway (better known as the East Coast Road) improvement would be to transport cane out of St. Andrew to the new factory.

    Government however, is entirely unconvincing in its positions regarding sugar. I can’t help getting the feeling that it is in bed with some contractors and has completely failed in its duty to plan for the betterment of our country.

    If I am wrong, it won’t be the first time and I apologise in advance, but if I am right, the mess that will be made beggars description.

    You cannot hold a couple of hundred thousand people to ransom just to benefit a few people. It is wrong ….. don’t care if the World Bank says that land is to be put to its highest economic use.

    Remember, agriculture has served us as an economic activity for more than 300 years, ten generations.

    What we call development has in less than 50 years, two generations, caused us to have to sewer the coast, put the water supply into jeopardy and in general increased stress levels.

    …. and our Government, bless their hearts says we want more!!

  8. John

    Carl Moore

    Suppose we put back in the railway from College Savannah to Bridgetown and made it attractive for people to park at College Savannah, or Carrington, or Constant or wherever and ride the train to Bridgetown.

    Suppose we also put in a rail link along the ABC Highway through Spring Garden to Town and also along Highway 2A with the same objective, to get cars off the road.

    Wouldn’t your objectives be met as well as a reduction in the fuel import bill and foreign exchange demand for cars?

    Making Barbados bigger is a bit too futuristic and I can’t say I could go along with that idea. Barbados is currently about 106,000 acres and I don’t see how it would be economically feasible to add 100 acres on like the Deep Water Harbour 50 years ago. What activity would support the expenditure.

    A new city in St. Lucy would need water. We really have ignored this key resource which is essential to any growth. Who knows, we may frigure out how to tap the water resource in the Scotland District but at the moment, the Ground water resource is already committed and some developments are already compromising some of this resource.

  9. Carl Moore

    John, you suggested: “Suppose we put back in the railway from College Savannah to Bridgetown and made it attractive for people to park at College Savannah, or Carrington, or Constant or wherever and ride the train to Bridgetown.”

    Good idea. There’s no single solution to our problems. A rail system is definitely a consideration for the future.

    You talk about a “way to get cars off the road”. That’s not on, I’m afraid. The horse is already out of the … Sorry, the car is already out of the garage! Or is it out of Japan?

    The opposite is happening, and will continue. Look into the storage areas at Simpson’s, Courtesy, and the scores of private importers. Listen to that five-minute programme on VOB on mornings sponsored by just one dealer (Simpson’s) advertising their cars and telling us about every new shipment due.

    I just heard the Minister of Works project in the House that we can expect 150,ooo cars by 2020; we are now at around 116,000, he says. His estimate might be conservative.

    You ask what to do with reclaimed land. The first suggestion that comes to mind is as storage space for oil. I am most uncomfortable with so many large storage tanks near housing districts.

    Rest assured that people will always find things to put on land. What about recreational facilities? A boatyard? Think, man. It’s not about us; it’s about our offspring. If we mash up the place and hand it to them, they’re going to curse us when we’re in our graves … wherever those will be. Not much land left at Westbury.

    You worried: “Making Barbados bigger is a bit too futuristic and I can’t say I could go along with that idea.” I can understand why you can’t go along with that idea: when it is done, you and I might not be here. Engineering can tame most problems.

    You ask about water. What a question! Aren’t we surrounded by it? Do I have to spell out how to use that? I thought Bizzy Williams and his colleagues have already shown how.

    Nothing, my dear sir, is “too futuristic”.

  10. Carl Moore

    John, you suggested: “Suppose we put back in the railway from College Savannah to Bridgetown and made it attractive for people to park at College Savannah, or Carrington, or Constant or wherever and ride the train to Bridgetown.”

    Solid idea. There’s no single solution to our problems. A rail system is definitely a consideration for the future.

    You talk about a “way to get cars off the road”. That’s not on, I’m afraid. The horse is already out of the … Sorry, the car is already out of the garage! Or is it out of Japan?

    The opposite is happening, and will continue. Look into the storage areas at Simpson’s, Courtesy, and the scores of private importers. Listen to that five-minute programme on VOB on mornings sponsored by just one dealer (Simpson’s) advertising their cars and telling us about every new shipment due.

    I just heard the Minister of Works project in the House that we can expect 150,ooo cars by 2020; we are now at around 116,000, he says. His estimate might be conservative.

    You ask what to do with reclaimed land. The first suggestion that comes to mind is as storage space for oil. I am most uncomfortable with so many large storage tanks near housing districts.

    Rest assured that people will always find things to put on land. What about recreational facilities? A boatyard?

    As we speak, the Coast Guard’s spanking, new headquarters buildings are going up just behind the flour mill adjacent to the Bridgetown port. That’s a small piece of reclaimed land that was not there two years ago. Instead of reclaiming three or four acres, why not go for 100?

    We do things piecemeal because we think piecemeal. Example: the ABC Highway. In 1988, four lanes were “too futuristic”. Some called the idea madness.

    Think, man. It’s not about us; it’s about our offspring. If we mash up the place and hand it to them, they’re going to curse us when we’re in our graves … wherever those will be. Not much land left at Westbury. I don’t want to occupy any of it; I’ve asked my folks to cremate me.

    You worried: “Making Barbados bigger is a bit too futuristic and I can’t say I could go along with that idea.” I can understand why you can’t go along with that idea: when it is done, you and I might not be here. Engineering can tame most problems.

    You ask about water. What a question! Aren’t we surrounded by it? Do I have to spell out how to use that? I thought Bizzy Williams and his associates have already shown how.

    Nothing, my dear sir, is “too futuristic”.

  11. Crusty

    Please don’t discount the proposal for ferries
    between Oistins, Bridgetown, and Speightstown.
    The “roadway” already exists; the travel time
    would likely be shorter during rush hours; and
    City congestion would be reduced greatly.

    Ferries need the parking highrises too, but they
    would be in a different location from those
    aimed at highway traffic reduction.

    If we consider Barbados as a metropolitan area
    instead of a country, then examples abound of
    unified public transit systems feeding many
    more commuters into downtown cores than
    would ever enter Bridgetown on a day. And they
    run on time too – often at ten minute intervals
    during rush hours.

    As a first step, car drivers should be required to
    pay for the privilege of parking in the City. Let’s
    see those parking meters apparently in storage
    somewhere. And of course, enforced ticketing
    penalties for infringement. How does $ 20 per
    day sound?

  12. Crusty

    The $ 20 per day is for parking, not the penalty
    which should be much higher.

  13. John

    Carl Moore

    Go look at desalination costs.

    Read the article in the Nation of 30th April about Apes Hill which explains why the developers of Apes Hill need to use water from the adjacent catchment area supplying Trents pumping station. They are quite straightforward, desalination is too costly!! Somebody is going to suck salt, and my bet is it won’t be the developers.

    I think Bizzy Williams and his associates are involved in this project too and desal is too expensive for them, they say so!!

    The “desal” plant at Spring Garden polishes water at up to 5000 ppm compared with 35000 ppm of total dissolved solids for sea water, ie, most of the fresh water it produces comes from the same catchment as the Belle, Codrington, Applewaithes and Sweet Vale, not from the sea!!

    True desal is too expensive. Google desalination and Barbados and read the specifications of the plant!! Don’t listen to me, or what you are told!! Read it for yourself.

    Then go figure out the profit this operation makes!!

    To what economic use will reclaimed land in excess of 100 acres be put to justify the capital outlay? You have listed uses but do we need another deep water harbour? If you can make an economic case for making land in the sea, I will back you.

    Not to say there are none. Singapore has found one. Because of the nature of a nearby island, they have relocated the population of a small island offshore and “filled” around it to serve as a “landfill” for the output of their four incinerators. They claim to have landfill capacity to 2043!! Go look on Google Earth. It is fascinating. Not sure if the islanders are all that happy though!!

    Given the open location of Barbados in the ocean, I couldn’t support a similar undertaking here, no matter what the engineering input.

    And if Singapore gets you going, google Singapore and water and see how much the island of Singapore (not much bigger than Barbados) uses per day and where it comes from.

    There are people cleverer than ourseves who are thinking of the future for their countries and making that thinking work.

    The minister of Works is not a fortune teller and has no academic qualification or practical experience which would lead me to believe any of his predictions about cars. He has merely quoted the situation as it exists today and tried to predict what will happen, no doubt to justify some expenditure of public funds. In a year or two a completely different one may predict the opposite.

    Comes down to what you believe, the possibility of his predictions coming true or the possibility of foreign exchange becoming limited and the price of oil going up.

    Of course our actions are for our offspring. That goes without saying, …… or for that matter thinking. But there also must be reality checks.

    Our futuristic thinking for the past centuries has been based on thrift and common sense. It still works, as it has in the past and is also futuristic thinking.

  14. John

    Carl Moore

    Sorry, got the date of the Nation article incorrect. It is Friday June 2nd, 2006.

    Here is a link.

    http://archive.nationnews.com/archive_detail.php?archiveFile=./pubfiles/bar/archive/2006/June/02/LocalNews/20619.xml&start=20&numPer=20&keyword=apes+hill&sectionSearch=&begindate=1%2F1%2F1994&enddate=10%2F11%2F2006&authorSearch=&IncludeStories=1&pubsection=&page=&IncludePages=1&IncludeImages=1&mode=allwords&archive_pubname=Daily+Nation%09%09%09

    The quote I would draw your attention to is “Atwell said that lots of research was undertaken to ensure the feasibility of of this project. And that the only other option was a desalination plant, but that would have been too costly”.

  15. duh

    I REFUSE to believe there are people out there clever-er than Bajans!

    No.
    Tell me it’s not so.
    Here we are at the very Center of the Universe,
    ergo WE are the most clever-er ppl in D.Universe.

  16. Do da Math.

    Let’s do some Math.
    How many cars does City Centre multi-level car park hold?

    Thirty Thousand?
    Forty thousand?

    No.
    It holds a few hundred.

    In other words, one City Center multi storey car park is a drop in the bucket viz a viz the actual requirement needed to meaningfully reduce traffic congestion in the Bridgetown area.

    What we now need in this country, (sparing no expense of course,
    coz it’s not MY money I’m spending..),
    is about a zillion City Center multi-storey car parks,
    positioned as each hiway (1 to 7!) intersects outer-suburban-Bridgetown.

    To wit:
    we need THREE City Centre multi-storey car parks nr. the Lazaretto,
    at the btm. of University Hill.
    Another TWO such car packs at the Hinds Hill intersection.
    Another FOUR such car parks nr. Simpson at Warrens,
    another THREE such car parks at Hothersal Turning,
    another THREE at the next intersection area(Norman Niles?)
    another THREE nr. TriMart/World Gym
    anothr THREE nr. Pine Hill Dairy,
    another TWO nr. Cable&Wireless’s big tall bldg.
    another TWO at Sir Gary’s statue,
    another TWO car parks at Graeme Hall roundabout!
    and last but not least,
    another THREE near the Top Rock roundabout.

    Since this ‘miniscule expense’ will be funded
    by our Champagne Taste//Mauby Money budget
    (maybe Fadder China will help us??)
    it should be ‘No Problem At All’ !

    God knows we have “lotsa” space to do this,
    and “lotsa” funding to accomplish it.
    we could get the whole lot done,finished, working in ..what..?
    – a year and a half?
    ……………………….
    and then I woke up with a loud pop
    coz it’ll neverrr happen!

    But basically, THAT’s what we REALLY need to store the 75,000 cars daily(Mon. to Fri.) – not counting the reliable Shuttle Service to facilitate drivers to/from B’town!

    Railroads?
    CHEEAAPP! Let’s get TWO.

    I reckon our big problem here is Champagne Taste but Mauby Money.

    In a word, we are STUCK!

  17. BK

    somebodie tell me that Bizzy billing a car park in Warrens shortly.

  18. John

    Carl Moore

    Here is an economically justifiable land reclamation done by Singapore and opened in 1999.

    It addresses the garbage problem and land scarcity.

    While it may work for Singapore, it might not for Barbados.

    This link below is really concise.

    Looks like Singapore went from producing 1200 tons per day of garbage in 1970 to producing 6800 tons of garbage per day in 2004. We produce about a tenth of the garbage Singapore does. Singapore however also produces 600 tons of garbage daily which cannot be incinerated, about what we produce in total.

    The aerial photo on page 7 tells a story.

    http://www.env.go.jp/recycle/3r/en/s_officials/02_02/12.pdf#search=%22singapore%20landfill%22

    Here are a couple of other links worth looking at. Google Singapore and Landfill.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulau_Semakau

    http://www.rsi.sg/english/assignment/view/20041103175327/1/.html

    http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/F4843777-B6BA-4D9C-A5B0-F4C30813CF0E.htm

    Compare Singapore’s get up and go attitude with the 12 years of messing around with incinerators and Greenland in Barbados.

    I agree, our thinking is just not up to it.

    However, there are physical advantages Singapore enjoys which far outstrip what we have at our disposal, the major one being its proximity to the Malaysian Peninsula.

    We must be thrifty and use common sense where our limited resources are concerned.

  19. John

    Carl Moore

    Here is a how Singapore gets it water.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_resources_of_Singapore

    50% is from rainfall on the island

    The rest is imported from the Malaysian Peninsula. There is also some recycling and desalination now provides about 10% of the daily requirement.

    Singapore consumes about 10 times the volume of water we consume!! Its economy is several times larger and yet the island, not much bigger than our own accommodates 4 million people.

    Singapore recognises its sovreignty is determined by access to fresh water and will in time no doubt go more and more to desalination which given its economy makes economic sense.

    It has agreements with Malaysia to import water and purify it for its own use. It also sells back the purified water to Malaysia at a profit!!

    Malaysia obviously can get the technology to purify its own water and no doubt can hardly wait for the agreements with Singapore to expire, 2011 and 2061.

    Believe I have also seen a reference somewhere on the net where Singapore and Malaysia are before an international court to resolve their differences over water.

    Compare the water situation in Barbados with what Singapore is doing.

    Again, remember that Singapore has significant advantages over Barbados by virtue of its proximity to the Malaysian Peninsula. Now if we were closer to Guyana, or Dominica …. !!

    But we aren’t, so we really need to be thrifty and use our common sense.

    …. and yet, still we are operating in the absence of a Physical Development Plan …… man!!

  20. Andrew

    “Manufacturing needs a shot in the arm!”

    AIN’T IT THE TRUTH!!?”

    Joe Smith started the day early having set his alarm clock (MADE IN
    JAPAN) for 6am. While his coffeepot (MADE IN CHINA) was perking, he shaved
    with his electric razor (MADE IN HONG KONG). He put on a dress shirt (MADE
    IN SRI LANKA), designer jeans (MADE IN SINGAPORE) and tennis shoes (MADE IN
    KOREA). After cooking his breakfast in his new electric skillet(MADE IN
    INDIA) he sat down with his calculator (MADE IN MEXICO) to see how much he
    could spend today. After setting his watch (MADE IN TAIWAN) to the radio
    (MADE IN INDIA) he got in his car (MADE IN JAPAN) filled it with GAS from
    Trinidad and continued his search for a good paying BAJAN JOB. At
    the end of yet another discouraging and fruitless day checking his Computer
    (Made In Malaysia), Joe decided to relax for a while. He put on his sandals
    (MADE IN BRAZIL) poured himself a glass of wine (MADE IN FRANCE.!)
    and turned on his TV(MADE IN INDONESIA), and then wondered why
    he can’t find a good paying job in.. BARBADOS…..
    and why the ‘public debt’ is so high

    ———— ——— ——— ——— ——–

  21. Green!

    Manufacturing needs a ‘re-valued’ Barbados Dollar as its ‘shot in the arm’
    but revaluation is an undesirable subject.

    Our national motto is Pride and Industry.
    Lots of one, not so lots of the other.
    Funny situation.
    Much National Ego rides on the ‘strength’ of the Barbados Dollar.
    Economically-uneducated Bajans perceive that Trinidad is a lesser country becoz its Dollar is 6:1

    Bajans would be happy as hell to hear that yes the Bds. $ IS being re-valued, UPwards,
    and that effective midnight tonight the Bds. Dollar is now on par with the U.S.Dollar,
    better yet.. with the Cayman Dollar which is worth a few cents over the US$.

    Never mind the consequences for “Industry” would be dire to say the least, it would make the average idiot electorate happy as hell and be a further ego boost to the islanders!

    The horrible awful truth is that perhaps B’dos. shoulda devalued back then when the Trini’s did the same thing.
    Yes, we woulda ketchass for a few yrs., as they did,
    but by now, we’d be better off and might actually have a viable Manufacturing Sector.

  22. william duguid

    John Brathwaite got up as the cock crowed( made in Barbados) drank his morning milk(made in Barbados) ate his eggs and fried plantain(made in Barbados) put on his shirt and pants (made in Barbados) and went into the field to plant lettuce, tend to his banana trees and lime trees and sheep and milk the cows (all made in Barbados.)
    He then ate lamb and sweet potatoes (made in Barbados) cooked with natural gas (from Barbados) and drank some mauby (made in Barbados) before setting off to sell his produce of limes, lettuce, sweet peppers, beans and lamb that he had grown. (made in Barbados).
    He also sold some pots and earthen ware he had (made in Barbados) together with a few wooden sculptures (made in Barbados).

    He thought to himself. Life is what you make of it. Do not feel sorry for your self get up and work with what you have.

  23. John

    William

    We don’t have to settle for less ….

    Remember that song.

    ….. and by the way, eggs come from chickens which are hatched from eggs which are fertilised abroad, imported from abroad and incubated here, ….. check the hatcheries!!

    The poultry industry depends on those imported eggs last time I checked!! Hope I got that right and my understanding hasn’t been overtaken by events.

    ….. but I agree wholeheartedly, … life is what you make it.

    Work with what you have. You will be amazed by the results.

  24. Pat

    Okay for Dr. Duguid to talk. He got a leg up. A question of birthright and inheritance, no?

  25. william duguid

    Dear Pat,

    I have had the same opportunities as every one else. Grew up in a working class neighbourhood.
    Worked hard and applied myself from very young all the way through secondary school. Sent away by the Government for my tertiary education.
    My father before me grew up in the Bay Land. He too worked hard to give his kids a better life. We were not well off but he was able to help people in our area less well off than us with credit to feed their children and themselves.
    I certainly did not have a life of priviledge as you are suggesting. I was always taught to be resourceful and respectful but most of all to be contented.

  26. william duguid

    From a previous posting it was obvious that you some how knew my family so I am now very disappointed that you now put such a negative comment on this site.

  27. ILLUMINATOR

    I am far from an economic expert but all the countries that have devalued their dollar may have a bustling manufacturing sector . However , in all cases a widening gap between the rich and poor seems to have occured . Look at the crime situation in those countries Trinidad , Guyana , Jamaica to name a few . With real poverty , crime become a very viable and necessary occupation.

    We need help for sure but i somehow don’t feel devaluation is the answer .

  28. Pat

    Dr. Duguid, you are an educated man. Tell me how a leg up by birthright or inheritance becomes negative? All it shows is that some are more advantaged than others. Bill Gates dropped out of university and stated his company with a $3 million US trust fund, is this also negative?

  29. Pingback: Broad Street Journal In Decline? « Barbados Free Press

  30. J. Payne

    Want to know the BEST business opportunity in the Caribbean???????

    The DAY— Cuba switches to capitalism IMAGINE— the amount of Cement that market of 12 million people will want to buy— to repair all of their infrastructure or even tar/asphalt?????? If I had a few million I would get comfortable with Fidel now because when his system changes that will be the day Cuba will want tons of cement to build all new hotels etc.

  31. farmer

    carl moore

    I THOUGHT BETTER OF YOU. HOW CAN YOU SUGGEST THAT WE RECLAIM LAND. OBVIOUSLY YOU DO NOT REALISE THAT WHEN THAT HAPPENS THE WATER MUST GO SOMEWHERE. THE QUESTION IS WHERE AND WHEN IT COMES BACK TO RECLAIM ITS LAND WHAT HAPPENS THEN????