Tag Archives: Royal Barbados Police Force

All Sugar Hill Resort staff to be fingerprinted by police. No refusals allowed.

Barbados Police Fingerprints click image for police letter demanding staff fingerprints

Dear Barbados Free Press:

The police are requesting that all staff and contractors at Sugar Hill voluntarily submit for fingerprinting in relation to some break-ins at the resort. Is this legal? Will they also be fingerprinting guests who stayed at the resort? What about friends of owners? People eating at the restaurant during that time?  What will happen to the fingerprints?

This seems wrong and a bit racist. While it appears voluntary, there seems that there might be consequences if you refuse.

Has this fingerprinting been done before at other crime scenes? If something was stolen at a school will the police now be fingerprinting all students and all teachers? If something was stolen at Parliament, will Miss Mottley and Mr. Stuart “be first in line” like Sugar Hill Resort’s operations manager volunteers? Where is this going? Is this the new normal for the Barbados Police?

Concerned

The email from Sugar Hill Resort management…

From: sugarhill
Date: 6 March 2013
To:
Subject: RBPF Finger Printing Staff at Sugar Hill

Dear All,

As you are aware our file was passed to the Major Crimes Department in the Royal Barbados Police Force (RBPF). They have requested that all Staff with access to the Estate be finger printed as they are in possession of some forensic evidence, finger prints, from properties that suffered burglaries. See attached their letter of request. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Crime & Law, Police

Barbados Detective Constable on Owen Arthur: “Give the man 2 bottles of Mount Gay and tell him go home and don’t come back.”

Barbados Police Politics 2

Should police officers openly discuss politics?

by WSD

We have many sayings in Barbados and two of my favourites are mostly true: “Everything is political” and “Nothing is secret for long”.

Everything can’t help being political in a smaller society where everyone knows everyone else and knows everyone else’s business. You can sneak around on Bim with somebody’s husband or wife but sooner or later it will out. Sneaking around always does out in Bim.

No secrets when it come to politics either! Bees against Dems on election day and after election day too. In the public service when a supervisor position opens up, LOOK OUT! Watch the Bees and the Dems line up to support their brothers and sisters.

Our last Chief Justice – just the highest judge in the country that’s all – was a former BLP politician, attorney general and acting Prime Minister. Did something ever get judged one way and not some other way because the judge was a BLP and the accused was a BLP member too? That was always in the back of people’s minds and it shouldn’t have been. Whether David Simmons was a good Chief Justice or not doesn’t matter if it looked bad that he was a politician in charge of the courts.

When there is a possible conflict of interest based on family or friendships or business relationships it damages the people’s faith in the institutions. A big criticism of Chief Justice Simmons accepting the position was that it looked bad, and caused people to be suspicious that the highest judge might have conflicts of interest based on his politics.

So it can be with other government professions too, and that includes police officers.

“This tell me something about Owen Arthur, he pushed out Mia because he wanted to be prime minister if they won the elections, now they lost he put he back in, give the man 2 bottles of Mount Gay and tell him go home and don’t come back. My respect to Mia for taking things so cool.”

Posted on the BLP Facebook page by a Detective Constable of the Royal Barbados Police Force

Is it proper if a police officer discusses politics on the internet while identifying themselves as a police officer?      Continue reading

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A reasoned view of the Royal Barbados Police Force

barbados-police.jpg

If the current staff could be like the police officers I once knew

by Mark Fenty

We obviously cannot invalidate the important job the Royal Barbados Police Force is doing in Barbados, but we are certainly troubled by the many instances of misconduct surrounding this institution. Some people fail to realize that the Royal Barbados Police Force is much like any other organization in Barbados, and is therefore subject to some of the same faults and failings as all. And like any other organization there are good and bad apples within.

So with this thought in mind, we therefore cannot unilaterally or arbitrarily besmear the efforts of the majority for the wrong doings of a few bad apples in the Force. It is important however that we are impartial in our judgment of the Royal Barbados Police Force, and assign blame where it is needed. I think we all can agree that the job of a peace officer is quite difficult at times.

And to be quite frank, there are often calls for some officers to do things that aren’t conductive to proper policing. Nevertheless, too often some of us take for granted the effort it take on the part of these peace officers to maintain the public peace.

In any event, some of these peace officers are men of integrity whose objective it is to ensure the public order. Others are rotten apples who see an opportunity to use their position of power to take advantage of the marginalized elements in our society. I knew both elements quite well, because I was born and bred just behind a major police station in Barbados. I saw both sides of the coin but for the most part, most of the men and women I once knew were good nature people who would go out of their way to give you their shirt of their back. That’s the kind of men and women I once knew, and that’s the kind of men and women who once constituted the Royal Barbados Police Force in my day. I would like to give a shout out to Commission Alvin Griffith if he is still living, a man of honest purpose and simple integrity, cloth with the rare qualities of dignity, decency and decorum.

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Commissioner Dottin says accused rapist Derick Crawford confessed to particular knowledge of crimes

UPDATED: January 1, 2013 – Victims angry with Commissioner Dottin!

“Dr Rachel Turner and Diane Davies are hopping mad because of comments made by Commissioner of Police Darwin Dottin during a Press conference last week.

The top cop had indicated that both women were uncooperative during the investigation of their rape, at the same spot two days apart, and that the Police Force had done its job properly in arresting Derick Crawford.”

The Nation: Reopen the Case! Find the man who raped us!

But can we trust a confession collected by the police without video?

For years judges and commissions have recommended that the Royal Barbados Police Force video confessions to crimes to remove the doubts.

Why should there be doubts? Aren’t all our police officers perfectly proper and honest when it comes to confessions?

Bajans know that many young men have died or been seriously injured in police custody where it is said that the police were trying to obtain confessions. Our officers have been known to shoot unarmed bicyclists in the head when they didn’t stop for police for a “routine checkstop” and were riding away. Young men have been known to jump off a cliff 50 feet into the sea and die rather than face questioning by our police. Or maybe they didn’t jump.

Can you blame Bajans for having doubts about the confession of Derick Crawford? Did the police provide him with the “particular details” of the crime that appeared in his confession?

“We know what goes on ’bout hey, and that’s why we have doubts.”

Commissioner Dottin: we wouldn’t be having this conversation and public embarrassment if you had of ordered that confessions be videoed as you said you were going to do years ago.

Video courtesy of The Bajan Reporter

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Police

Barbados Police need to watch CSI crime shows!

dottin-police-concerns

“DNA evidence? Hair and semen samples? What’s that?” says the Commissioner of our Police

submitted by Johnny Up

In the wake of yet another world-wide embarrassment for the Royal Barbados Police Farce, Commissioner Darwin Dottin is desperately performing damage control. Again.

Dottin is becoming pretty adept at damage control: too bad he can’t devote the same amount of energy to managing major crimes – then he wouldn’t always be in this position.

This time it’s about Derick David Rudolph Crawford who languished in jail for two rapes he did not commit, or so say the two victims. Next time it will be about some other person who our police beat a confession out of or planted evidence on. It is a wonder the police bothered arresting Mr. Crawford at all but they needed a warm body to show the tourists. Crawford should consider himself lucky in some ways and don’t we all know it!

Video-taped confessions? What’s it take: a computer and an internet camera. Maybe a good old fashioned 8mm or VHS video camera, a $30 karaoke microphone on the never-never. Barbados police been talking ’bout video taping confessions for years. We’ve had studies, mentions in Parliament, statements from the COP and talk talk talk talk but never do. Why not? Police don’t want to, that’s why. Enough of the police force believe in the old way that if you beat a confession out of a man it’s still good because no man would confess to something he didn’t do. Some still believe that and they are ‘fast wit their fists and slow of their wits.’ That’s what they call them: fast fists, slow wits.

Dottin? He just need to go.

Fast.

Further Reading

Please visit The Nation to read the full article Case Study

Case Study

BY DAWNE PARRIS | TUE, DECEMBER 18, 2012 – 12:11 AM

COMMISSIONER OF POLICE Darwin Dottin will today begin a series of meetings with officials within and outside the Police Force before speaking publicly on the dismissal of two rape cases against a man whose British “victims” had insisted on his innocence. Continue reading

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Deputy Commissioner of Police Bertie Hinds retires. Leaves a legacy of conflict and chaos.

Submitted by Turtle Soup in response to Stephen Alleyne’s Under Scrutiny: Ciao, Bertie!

When his junior, Darwin Dottin, was promoted to Commissioner of Police, Bertie Hinds had to make a decision to do his best to support Dottin’s leadership and direction, or if he could not support the new Commissioner, to do the honourable thing and leave the Royal Barbados Police Force. Hinds had several good offers at the time in both government service and private industry and could have exited the police with best wishes from all in the larger community and a ‘well done, good and faithful servant’ from the vast majority of police personnel. He undoubtedly would have been successful in any new position where he was in ultimate charge because the man has vision and is a capable leader and policing professional.

“Stay and work to support the new police leadership, or leave – those were the two honourable choices. But Hinds chose a third option…”

Instead of going quietly or accepting his lot and doing his utmost to support the new Commissioner and his beloved Royal Barbados Police Force to the best of his ability, Bertie Hinds decided to stay and fight the new Commissioner of Police at every step – which he did most strongly for nine full years. As the clashes with Dottin became more serious, more frequent and increasingly public, the senior management of the RBPF became ineffective and split with various senior officers choosing sides. There were battles in court, and dirty tricks by Dottin and Hinds supporters. The focus of senior management (and increasingly by junior personnel also) shifted from serving the community to internal politics and conflict.

All of this was because Mr. Hinds could not discipline himself to say “Yes, Sir.” to the man whom Barbados chose over him to be the leader of the Royal Barbados Police Force. Some observers believe that Hinds thought he could someday be Commissioner of Police if he undermined Dottin sufficiently, and indeed during the battles there were calls from Hinds supporters to fire Dottin and promote Hinds.

Could Hinds have made a better Commissioner of Police than Dottin?

Possibly, even probably – but so what?

Dottin’s promotion and appointment was legal and it was the decision of those who were lawfully charged with making that decision. For whatever reason Hinds was not chosen and Dottin was.

Whatever Darwin Dottin’s professional and personal failings, he deserved better from Bertie Hinds than he got right from the start. As Commissioner of Police, Darwin Dottin deserved respect, support and most of all loyalty from his senior officers because anything else in a military organisation is destructive and undermines the public confidence in the institution.

Bertie Hinds has left the Royal Barbados Police Force, but the organisation and the community at large will be many years recovering from the decade of conflict and chaos in the senior leadership that Hinds could have stopped at any time by submitting his resignation or saying “Yes, Sir.”

Further Reading

Readers are encouraged to visit the Barbados Advocate to read Stephen Alleyne’s Ciao, Bertie! but unfortunately BFP must reprint the entire piece here because the Barbados Advocate has in the past deleted news stories to suit political agendas. As our post is based upon Alleyne’s article, we must preserve a copy… Continue reading

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What “special circumstances” make it okay to bite a police officer?

Barbados news media cooperates in the cover-up

by Holetown Brawler

The Court of Appeal is trying to suck and blow at the same time and with the help of the Barbados news media all they have done so far is to confuse the public, the police and the criminals.

Damien Omar Cummins bit a police officer and ripped off his shirt. For that he was sentenced to nine months in jail. Bite a police officer, go straight to jail. Fine. Everybody knows dats da rules!

But then the Court of Appeal quashed Cummins’ jail sentence – and then tried to say that wounding a police officer is serious business and people who do that can “generally” expect to go to jail.

“We consider a non-custodial sentence appropriate in the special circumstances of the case based on the information disclosed to this Court on the offences and the offender.” said the Court of Appeal.

That’s not good enough. Not by half.

Bajans deserve the truth, all the truth and nothing but the truth. It is not enough for the Court of Appeal or the news media to gloss over this story.

It’s not good enough for the public – who rightfully wonder what happened. It’s not good enough for the police officers – who rightfully wonder what made the court decide that this wounding of a police officer was ‘okay’. It’s not good enough for the criminals who are wondering if the rules have changed and the Barbados courts have gone soft on harming a police officer.

Is this a cover-up of bad police behaviour? Is it a cover-up of mistakes made by the DPP? WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED TO MAKE IT “SPECIAL”?

The public, the police and the thugs on the block may agree that the Court of Appeal’s position is proper justice: but they can’t be kept in the dark by the court and the news media who say “Trust us.”

That “Trust us” business doesn’t fly anymore.

Bajans want to know, and deserve to know: What were the “special circumstances” that made it okay for Damien Omar Cummins to bite a police officer and not go to jail?

Further Reading

BFP, May 19, 2012: Barbados Appeal Court: No jail time for wounding a police officer

Hands Off!

The Nation

PEOPLE who inflict physical violence on police officers, public officials and other people in authority during the execution of their duties can “generally” expect a custodial sentence from the court.

This warning was recently issued by the Court of Appeal while handing down a decision on an appeal by a 27-year-old man against the nine months’ prison sentence he received for biting a police officer. Continue reading

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