Tag Archives: Barbados Police

Amnesty International says Barbados police torture prisoners

Dottin Police Shootings

According to Amnesty, on March 17, Mottley and Headley, in the company of their lawyer, presented themselves at the Hastings police station in “good health”, as certified by a doctor.

But hours later, Mottley’s lawyer Brian Clarke reportedly received a call from his client requesting his urgent presence.

“When the lawyer arrived, he saw that Adrian Mottley was in distress, he had a split lip and had vomit on his mouth. Shortly afterwards he fainted and began foaming at the mouth, ” Amnesty claimed in the statement.

It said after receiving medical attention, Mottley later told his lawyer that “police officers had wrapped him in plastic wrap from his feet up to his neck and then [beat] him around the body.”

… from Barbados Today Tortured?

Do Bajans believe that the Royal Barbados Police Force regularly beats prisoners? Do fish swim in the sea?

A few reminders from BFP stories…

March 25, 2013  Was Derek Crawford beaten by police to make him confess to rape?

November 25, 2012 Barbados Police competence, brutality, in spotlight as ‘wrongful’ rape charges explode in worldwide news

December 2, 2011 Death in Police Custody

May 30, 2011  Barbados Bar Association President: Police beat confessions from suspects

Sept 9 2010 Dear Police Commissioner

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Human Rights, Police

Gunmen ambush patrolling Barbados police – one officer slightly shot

Barbados Murder Gun Revolver 3

“One officer slightly shot” sounds a bit strange, but it’s just about what the police and papers are saying happened on Tuesday night. The story only deserves four sentences in the Nation and Barbados Today because that is all the information released by the police.

Think about that folks: Gunmen saw patrolling police officers, then started shooting in an ambush. If that doesn’t sound like Kingston, Jamaica I don’t know what does.

But the police and the news media are playing down the incident, I suppose because the injured officer was only ‘slightly’ shot.

Strange times ’bout this place. Sometimes I swear somebody stole my country and put this new one under my feet. It looks like the same old place, but it isn’t.

A police detective was “slightly injured” when gunmen opened fire on a group of officers last night.

Police public relations officer Inspector David Welch says members of the Criminal Investigations Department were on patrol in Chapman Lane, the City around 11 pm when unknown assailants shot at them several times before running away.

He said police returned fire.

The incident is being investigated.

… from Barbados Today Men Shoot at Police

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Police

What happened to corruption charges against Barbados police inspector Martin Jones?

“It will be interesting to follow the Martin Jones case through court as I can’t recall ever seeing a Barbados Police Officer convicted of corruption offenses.

They always seem to walk off free.”

Barbados Free Press article March 22, 2012: Barbados Police Inspector charged in court caper

Retired RBPF Inspector Martin Jones

Retired RBPF Inspector Martin Jones

Almost two years ago a recently retired Royal Barbados Police Force Inspector, Martin Jones, was charged with perverting the course of justice in a big drug case. What happened since then? Was he convicted? Were the charges dropped?

Your guess is as good as ours because no one ever saw another reference to Inspector Martin Jones again.

Could it be that Inspector Jones is a SPECIAL FRIEND of Director of Public Prosecutions Charles Leacock? You know, just like that corrupt cop Sergeant Paul Vaughan (sometimes called Paul Vaughn) was a friend of the DPP? It’s not like it hasn’t happened before ’bout this rock…

“Well surprise, surprise! The Director of Public Prosecutions recently ordered the withdrawal of the bribery and perverting the course of justice charges against his friend, Sergeant Vaughn.

No public explanation was given – and the cowardly lapdogs in the Barbados news media never asked a single question even though the whole thing stinks to high heaven.”

… from the BFP article Secret withdrawal of Bribery Charges against Barbados cop stinks of corruption at the highest levels.

So let’s see if any BFP readers know what happened to the corruption charges against Barbados police inspector Martin Jones.

Ex-cop on bail (read the story at The Nation here)

BY HEATHER-LYNN EVANSON | THU, MARCH 22, 2012 – 12:11 AM

A retired police inspector accused of perverting the course of justice in a drug trafficking case was released on bail yesterday. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Police

How much crime until it is called “Civil Unrest” ???

U.S. Marine trains Barbados Defence Force in crowd control, June 2012.

U.S. Marine trains Barbados Defence Force personnel in tactics, clubs and shields for crowd control, June 2012.

Upsurge in crime and drugs feared – due to increased unemployment

Step #1: Government makes 3,000 workers redundant.

Step #2: Increased recruitment efforts for Barbados Defence Force.

Step #3: Politicians and police meet “to deal with any problems that may creep up… with unemployment due to increase as a result of public sector retrenchment.”

“We have to find ways to reach across the political divide,” the attorney general said.

… from the Barbados Today article Attorney general to meet with police top brass

Wuhloss! It sure sounds like somebody is getting a little nervous. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Economy, Police

Murder of former Barbados Immigration Chief Kenrick Hutson now six years cold

Barbados Murder Gun Revolver 3

Six years ago on December 28, 2007, retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, aged 74, was murdered at the front of his home on a Friday evening as his wife and daughter were inside.

The killer’s trail has long grown cold and the police question how a man who retired 14 years previously could have been an assassin’s target over something that happened while he was either on the police force or head of Immigration.

It doesn’t seem square though – a 74 year old long retired man doesn’t get shot down as he reads the newspaper on the verandah with family and neighbours right there.

The murder of a former Chief Immigration Officer raises all kinds of concerns and questions. Obviously a man of Hutson’s experience and service would have made some enemies in a post where he was in charge of Immigration processing, investigations, charges and deportations. But Hutson was retired, and presumably would have little input or influence into current immigration matters.

IF his murder is associated with his service as Chief Immigration Officer, it would seem that it was either revenge for some past action – or to prevent Hutson from testifying or revealing information about something he knew.

Somebody knows something. There was a reason for this murder.

After two years of intense investigation, the murder of retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, still remains a mystery to Police Investigators. Kenrick Hutson was a family man, a father of three children and husband of Coreen for over 44 years. He had a reputation of being a true gentleman among his peers and was well liked in his community and club circles.

Friends and relatives can think of no incident during his tenure as a Police Officer and Chief Immigration Officer that can be attributed as being a motive for his murder, 14 years into his retirement. However, on Friday December 28th 2007, at 6.50 pm Kenrick Hutson was murdered at his home located on Butlers Avenue, Spooners Hill, St. Michael.

Investigations indicate that the assailant walked from the direction of Codrington Hill, turned left into Butlers Avenue and proceeded to the Hutson residence. At the time of the incident, Mr. Hutson aged 74 was sitting on his verandah reading the daily newspapers, when the assailant entered the yard through the open front gate, climbed the steps leading to the verandah and shot Mr. Hutson several times about the body. The assailant then existed through the front gate and was seen running along Butlers Avenue towards Codrington Hill.

The assailant was identified as having a slim build, and dark complexion. He was wearing a whitish shirt, dark coloured pants and a cap with the peak facing front.

Crime Stoppers: March 17, 2010

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Immigration, Police

Crimes against tourists “Economic terrorism” but Barbados Bar Association says that’s not as important as everyone being shot in an equal manner

"The road is closed. I need ten dollars."

“The road is closed. I need ten dollars.”

Barbados Hotel and Tourism Association wants special courts for tourist crimes – Lawyers say no way

by passin thru

We have a problem on this island right now – crimes against locals and tourists alike have skyrocketed, including street robberies where people are injured. Old folks pushed down for their bags or slammed in the face as the evil creatures grab their chains or tear off their rings. I heard one story a few weeks ago where the robber carried a small dishsoap bottle and shoved the old lady down breaking her glasses then out with the soap and rip off those rings. That’s getting vicious even for some of the badd boys on the block.

A single crime against one tourist is economic terrorism.

The badd boys on the block have to know that if they touch a tourist, the police are going to hunt them down and the court is going to give them double.

Lately two British tourists off a cruise ship got shot on a Sunday afternoon walking in the daylight. Word of that spread and the rest of the tourists headed back to the boat lickity split. Just like what happens when you drop an elevator full of people in New York City – businesses leave that office building, and they don’t renew their leases no matter how much you lower the rent. You can tell ‘em all the time that the elevators are fixed, inspected, repaired, replaced, brand new… tell ‘em what you want but once you drop an elevator full of people in New York City it’s all over for five years because so many other buildings rent office space and they haven’t dropped any elevators lately.

Barbados has dropped a whole lot of elevators lately when it comes to crimes against tourists. What you what? We got it! Unsolved rapes with the wrong man in jail for two years? Check. Tourists shot off the cruise boats or walking near their hotel? Check. Tourists beaten on the beach trying to stop a purse grab? How many you want? Boscobel Toll Gang? Still in business as strong as ever. Long Beach rapes for two years and police did nothing until some poor tourist died? We had that too and the police never did find who was torturing all those dogs and hanging them in the bushy ridge. A person who would do that to a dog is a big danger to everyone, but the police say “It’s only a dog”.

Barbados Hotel and Tourism Association (BHTA), president Patricia Affonso-Dass says that a special court should be established for dealing with crimes against tourists. The Bar Association says that is unfair because it means that a crime against a citizen is then viewed as less serious.

Wide-eyed tourists are like little children and deserve more protection

I agree with the BHTA. Some crimes against certain victims are more serious. Crimes against children are always viewed more seriously because we know that the children can’t protect themselves as well as adults can.

It’s the same thing with tourists. They are like little children when they walk these fields and hills and streets and beaches and it is up to Barbados to protect them and look after them more than we normally do with adults.

And if we don’t look after the tourists specially, you know that St. Lucia or Cuba would be happy to take special care of them.

Winston Churchill once said “The inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.”

I’ll change that and say that “The inherent virtue of equal status for all victims is the equal sharing of no tourist revenues.”

It’s the best I can do on a Thursday morning before work.

passin thru

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Crime & Law, Police

A reasoned view of the Royal Barbados Police Force

barbados-police.jpg

If the current staff could be like the police officers I once knew

by Mark Fenty

We obviously cannot invalidate the important job the Royal Barbados Police Force is doing in Barbados, but we are certainly troubled by the many instances of misconduct surrounding this institution. Some people fail to realize that the Royal Barbados Police Force is much like any other organization in Barbados, and is therefore subject to some of the same faults and failings as all. And like any other organization there are good and bad apples within.

So with this thought in mind, we therefore cannot unilaterally or arbitrarily besmear the efforts of the majority for the wrong doings of a few bad apples in the Force. It is important however that we are impartial in our judgment of the Royal Barbados Police Force, and assign blame where it is needed. I think we all can agree that the job of a peace officer is quite difficult at times.

And to be quite frank, there are often calls for some officers to do things that aren’t conductive to proper policing. Nevertheless, too often some of us take for granted the effort it take on the part of these peace officers to maintain the public peace.

In any event, some of these peace officers are men of integrity whose objective it is to ensure the public order. Others are rotten apples who see an opportunity to use their position of power to take advantage of the marginalized elements in our society. I knew both elements quite well, because I was born and bred just behind a major police station in Barbados. I saw both sides of the coin but for the most part, most of the men and women I once knew were good nature people who would go out of their way to give you their shirt of their back. That’s the kind of men and women I once knew, and that’s the kind of men and women who once constituted the Royal Barbados Police Force in my day. I would like to give a shout out to Commission Alvin Griffith if he is still living, a man of honest purpose and simple integrity, cloth with the rare qualities of dignity, decency and decorum.

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