Tag Archives: Barbados Police

Amnesty International says Barbados police torture prisoners

Dottin Police Shootings

According to Amnesty, on March 17, Mottley and Headley, in the company of their lawyer, presented themselves at the Hastings police station in “good health”, as certified by a doctor.

But hours later, Mottley’s lawyer Brian Clarke reportedly received a call from his client requesting his urgent presence.

“When the lawyer arrived, he saw that Adrian Mottley was in distress, he had a split lip and had vomit on his mouth. Shortly afterwards he fainted and began foaming at the mouth, ” Amnesty claimed in the statement.

It said after receiving medical attention, Mottley later told his lawyer that “police officers had wrapped him in plastic wrap from his feet up to his neck and then [beat] him around the body.”

… from Barbados Today Tortured?

Do Bajans believe that the Royal Barbados Police Force regularly beats prisoners? Do fish swim in the sea?

A few reminders from BFP stories…

March 25, 2013  Was Derek Crawford beaten by police to make him confess to rape?

November 25, 2012 Barbados Police competence, brutality, in spotlight as ‘wrongful’ rape charges explode in worldwide news

December 2, 2011 Death in Police Custody

May 30, 2011  Barbados Bar Association President: Police beat confessions from suspects

Sept 9 2010 Dear Police Commissioner

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Human Rights, Police

Gunmen ambush patrolling Barbados police – one officer slightly shot

Barbados Murder Gun Revolver 3

“One officer slightly shot” sounds a bit strange, but it’s just about what the police and papers are saying happened on Tuesday night. The story only deserves four sentences in the Nation and Barbados Today because that is all the information released by the police.

Think about that folks: Gunmen saw patrolling police officers, then started shooting in an ambush. If that doesn’t sound like Kingston, Jamaica I don’t know what does.

But the police and the news media are playing down the incident, I suppose because the injured officer was only ‘slightly’ shot.

Strange times ’bout this place. Sometimes I swear somebody stole my country and put this new one under my feet. It looks like the same old place, but it isn’t.

A police detective was “slightly injured” when gunmen opened fire on a group of officers last night.

Police public relations officer Inspector David Welch says members of the Criminal Investigations Department were on patrol in Chapman Lane, the City around 11 pm when unknown assailants shot at them several times before running away.

He said police returned fire.

The incident is being investigated.

… from Barbados Today Men Shoot at Police

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What happened to corruption charges against Barbados police inspector Martin Jones?

“It will be interesting to follow the Martin Jones case through court as I can’t recall ever seeing a Barbados Police Officer convicted of corruption offenses.

They always seem to walk off free.”

Barbados Free Press article March 22, 2012: Barbados Police Inspector charged in court caper

Retired RBPF Inspector Martin Jones

Retired RBPF Inspector Martin Jones

Almost two years ago a recently retired Royal Barbados Police Force Inspector, Martin Jones, was charged with perverting the course of justice in a big drug case. What happened since then? Was he convicted? Were the charges dropped?

Your guess is as good as ours because no one ever saw another reference to Inspector Martin Jones again.

Could it be that Inspector Jones is a SPECIAL FRIEND of Director of Public Prosecutions Charles Leacock? You know, just like that corrupt cop Sergeant Paul Vaughan (sometimes called Paul Vaughn) was a friend of the DPP? It’s not like it hasn’t happened before ’bout this rock…

“Well surprise, surprise! The Director of Public Prosecutions recently ordered the withdrawal of the bribery and perverting the course of justice charges against his friend, Sergeant Vaughn.

No public explanation was given – and the cowardly lapdogs in the Barbados news media never asked a single question even though the whole thing stinks to high heaven.”

… from the BFP article Secret withdrawal of Bribery Charges against Barbados cop stinks of corruption at the highest levels.

So let’s see if any BFP readers know what happened to the corruption charges against Barbados police inspector Martin Jones.

Ex-cop on bail (read the story at The Nation here)

BY HEATHER-LYNN EVANSON | THU, MARCH 22, 2012 – 12:11 AM

A retired police inspector accused of perverting the course of justice in a drug trafficking case was released on bail yesterday. Continue reading

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How much crime until it is called “Civil Unrest” ???

U.S. Marine trains Barbados Defence Force in crowd control, June 2012.

U.S. Marine trains Barbados Defence Force personnel in tactics, clubs and shields for crowd control, June 2012.

Upsurge in crime and drugs feared – due to increased unemployment

Step #1: Government makes 3,000 workers redundant.

Step #2: Increased recruitment efforts for Barbados Defence Force.

Step #3: Politicians and police meet “to deal with any problems that may creep up… with unemployment due to increase as a result of public sector retrenchment.”

“We have to find ways to reach across the political divide,” the attorney general said.

… from the Barbados Today article Attorney general to meet with police top brass

Wuhloss! It sure sounds like somebody is getting a little nervous. Continue reading

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Murder of former Barbados Immigration Chief Kenrick Hutson now six years cold

Barbados Murder Gun Revolver 3

Six years ago on December 28, 2007, retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, aged 74, was murdered at the front of his home on a Friday evening as his wife and daughter were inside.

The killer’s trail has long grown cold and the police question how a man who retired 14 years previously could have been an assassin’s target over something that happened while he was either on the police force or head of Immigration.

It doesn’t seem square though – a 74 year old long retired man doesn’t get shot down as he reads the newspaper on the verandah with family and neighbours right there.

The murder of a former Chief Immigration Officer raises all kinds of concerns and questions. Obviously a man of Hutson’s experience and service would have made some enemies in a post where he was in charge of Immigration processing, investigations, charges and deportations. But Hutson was retired, and presumably would have little input or influence into current immigration matters.

IF his murder is associated with his service as Chief Immigration Officer, it would seem that it was either revenge for some past action – or to prevent Hutson from testifying or revealing information about something he knew.

Somebody knows something. There was a reason for this murder.

After two years of intense investigation, the murder of retired Chief Immigration Officer Kenrick Hutson, still remains a mystery to Police Investigators. Kenrick Hutson was a family man, a father of three children and husband of Coreen for over 44 years. He had a reputation of being a true gentleman among his peers and was well liked in his community and club circles.

Friends and relatives can think of no incident during his tenure as a Police Officer and Chief Immigration Officer that can be attributed as being a motive for his murder, 14 years into his retirement. However, on Friday December 28th 2007, at 6.50 pm Kenrick Hutson was murdered at his home located on Butlers Avenue, Spooners Hill, St. Michael.

Investigations indicate that the assailant walked from the direction of Codrington Hill, turned left into Butlers Avenue and proceeded to the Hutson residence. At the time of the incident, Mr. Hutson aged 74 was sitting on his verandah reading the daily newspapers, when the assailant entered the yard through the open front gate, climbed the steps leading to the verandah and shot Mr. Hutson several times about the body. The assailant then existed through the front gate and was seen running along Butlers Avenue towards Codrington Hill.

The assailant was identified as having a slim build, and dark complexion. He was wearing a whitish shirt, dark coloured pants and a cap with the peak facing front.

Crime Stoppers: March 17, 2010

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Crimes against tourists “Economic terrorism” but Barbados Bar Association says that’s not as important as everyone being shot in an equal manner

"The road is closed. I need ten dollars."

“The road is closed. I need ten dollars.”

Barbados Hotel and Tourism Association wants special courts for tourist crimes – Lawyers say no way

by passin thru

We have a problem on this island right now – crimes against locals and tourists alike have skyrocketed, including street robberies where people are injured. Old folks pushed down for their bags or slammed in the face as the evil creatures grab their chains or tear off their rings. I heard one story a few weeks ago where the robber carried a small dishsoap bottle and shoved the old lady down breaking her glasses then out with the soap and rip off those rings. That’s getting vicious even for some of the badd boys on the block.

A single crime against one tourist is economic terrorism.

The badd boys on the block have to know that if they touch a tourist, the police are going to hunt them down and the court is going to give them double.

Lately two British tourists off a cruise ship got shot on a Sunday afternoon walking in the daylight. Word of that spread and the rest of the tourists headed back to the boat lickity split. Just like what happens when you drop an elevator full of people in New York City – businesses leave that office building, and they don’t renew their leases no matter how much you lower the rent. You can tell ‘em all the time that the elevators are fixed, inspected, repaired, replaced, brand new… tell ‘em what you want but once you drop an elevator full of people in New York City it’s all over for five years because so many other buildings rent office space and they haven’t dropped any elevators lately.

Barbados has dropped a whole lot of elevators lately when it comes to crimes against tourists. What you what? We got it! Unsolved rapes with the wrong man in jail for two years? Check. Tourists shot off the cruise boats or walking near their hotel? Check. Tourists beaten on the beach trying to stop a purse grab? How many you want? Boscobel Toll Gang? Still in business as strong as ever. Long Beach rapes for two years and police did nothing until some poor tourist died? We had that too and the police never did find who was torturing all those dogs and hanging them in the bushy ridge. A person who would do that to a dog is a big danger to everyone, but the police say “It’s only a dog”.

Barbados Hotel and Tourism Association (BHTA), president Patricia Affonso-Dass says that a special court should be established for dealing with crimes against tourists. The Bar Association says that is unfair because it means that a crime against a citizen is then viewed as less serious.

Wide-eyed tourists are like little children and deserve more protection

I agree with the BHTA. Some crimes against certain victims are more serious. Crimes against children are always viewed more seriously because we know that the children can’t protect themselves as well as adults can.

It’s the same thing with tourists. They are like little children when they walk these fields and hills and streets and beaches and it is up to Barbados to protect them and look after them more than we normally do with adults.

And if we don’t look after the tourists specially, you know that St. Lucia or Cuba would be happy to take special care of them.

Winston Churchill once said “The inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.”

I’ll change that and say that “The inherent virtue of equal status for all victims is the equal sharing of no tourist revenues.”

It’s the best I can do on a Thursday morning before work.

passin thru

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Crime & Law, Police

A reasoned view of the Royal Barbados Police Force

barbados-police.jpg

If the current staff could be like the police officers I once knew

by Mark Fenty

We obviously cannot invalidate the important job the Royal Barbados Police Force is doing in Barbados, but we are certainly troubled by the many instances of misconduct surrounding this institution. Some people fail to realize that the Royal Barbados Police Force is much like any other organization in Barbados, and is therefore subject to some of the same faults and failings as all. And like any other organization there are good and bad apples within.

So with this thought in mind, we therefore cannot unilaterally or arbitrarily besmear the efforts of the majority for the wrong doings of a few bad apples in the Force. It is important however that we are impartial in our judgment of the Royal Barbados Police Force, and assign blame where it is needed. I think we all can agree that the job of a peace officer is quite difficult at times.

And to be quite frank, there are often calls for some officers to do things that aren’t conductive to proper policing. Nevertheless, too often some of us take for granted the effort it take on the part of these peace officers to maintain the public peace.

In any event, some of these peace officers are men of integrity whose objective it is to ensure the public order. Others are rotten apples who see an opportunity to use their position of power to take advantage of the marginalized elements in our society. I knew both elements quite well, because I was born and bred just behind a major police station in Barbados. I saw both sides of the coin but for the most part, most of the men and women I once knew were good nature people who would go out of their way to give you their shirt of their back. That’s the kind of men and women I once knew, and that’s the kind of men and women who once constituted the Royal Barbados Police Force in my day. I would like to give a shout out to Commission Alvin Griffith if he is still living, a man of honest purpose and simple integrity, cloth with the rare qualities of dignity, decency and decorum.

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An embarassing moment for Police Commissioner Dottin

Clinton Norton: Sand in nostrils and mouth shows he didn't die indoors at the burglary.

Clinton Norton: Sand in nostrils and mouth shows he didn’t die indoors at the burglary.

Every once in a while the Nation or the Barbados Advocate or the CBC run a “feel good” story about our Royal Barbados Police Force – usually after some scandal that brings international attention to the failings of our understaffed, under-trained, under-paid bunch of temporary workers charged with keeping people safe on this rock.

“Of course Crawford confessed to a particular knowledge of the crime, who wouldn’t? How long could one man tolerate a serious beating at the CID?”

BFP reader Mark Fenty on Commissioner Dottin says accused rapist Derick Crawford confessed

The last big scandal was an innocent man Derrick Crawford jailed for two years waiting for his trial for the rape of two Brit tourists who said he wasn’t the rapist. Before that the scandal was the police covering up the “apparent murder” of Clinton Norton who was tortured to death and found with blood in his lungs and sand in his nostrils and mouth – dead inside a store burglary with no sand on the floor! Then there was the finger rape of Jamaican tourist Myrie and the Terry Schwarzfeld and Colin Peter murders and attending police foul-ups. We could go on and on but you get the message: our police aren’t exactly world class.

Let me translate that for you…

Now in the wake of the Derrick Crawford foul-up where the only evidence against him was a “confession”, Police Commissioner Dottin is in the papers telling police to “avoid over reliance on confessions to solve crime,”

The real meaning of the Commissioner’s message to his officers?  “Stop beating confessions out of people.”

And of course in the news article there is the obligatory mention that videotaping of all confessions is coming “soon”. Sure! LOL!  Like it was coming “soon” 10 years ago!

Further Reading

Have a look at Barbados Today’s Uncouth SSU Cops, then…

We encourage our readers to go to the website of The Nation to read this news story, but we have to print the whole thing here because that paper has a history of changing the news. Read No need to rely on confession

No need to rely on confession

STRESSING the need to avoid over reliance on confessions to solve crime, Commissioner of Police, Darwin Dottin, has urged lawmen to remember the importance of science, technology and the collection of evidence. Continue reading

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What happened to Firearms Act charges against Owen Arthur’s brother?

Richard Seymour Arthur was charged with illegal possession of over 100 rounds of ammunition

When the brother of former Prime Minister Owen Arthur was found last February with 102 rounds of ammunition, “without permission, contrary to the Firearms Act of Barbados”, many folks were amazed that he was charged at all. We know how it is ’bout hey: there’s one law for ordinary people and another law for ‘special people’.

So it was unusual that the former BLP candidate and Owen’s brother should have found himself spending a few nights at Dodds Prison before getting bail.

And that’s the last we heard of it: Richard Arthur made bail and nothing since.

It may be that we’ve just missed more recent news stories and updates to the situation – but not one of us has seen anything.

So what’s happening? Was Richard Arthur convicted? Is the case still before the courts?

Or… as happens in so many cases, were the charges just quietly dropped on a Friday afternoon?

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The Simple Truth: Outrageously expensive Barbados police blimp is dead. Replacements available from US$500

Poor old Police Commissioner Darwin Dottin. Today he told The Nation that the seldom-seen (and therefore seldom used) police blimp is laid up for repairs and ‘issues’.

‘Issues’ ???

Dottin refused to say when the blimp will be back in service, and any Bajan knows that is Bim-speak for ‘never’. Good lord, how many hundred thousand dollars did the Owen Arthur government pay for that bag of helium and some radio control parts and video?

And now it is rotting somewhere, virtually unused since its proud debut at the failed Cricket World Cup five years ago.

Dottin complains that the helium necessary to fly the blimp is expensive. Well, duh! Didn’t the police study the costs on a per-flight basis when they bought this turkey? I guess not ’cause the cost appears to have been a surprise to Commissioner Dottin.

Well, Darwin old chap, don’t you worry!

You see, technology has marched right on in the last five or six years and now the Royal Barbados Police Force can purchase UAV – unmanned aerial surveillance vehicles – for a lousy US$500 each. They are called Parrots, and they work with an iPhone or iPad and have incredible maneuverability along with HD video capability – live broadcast and recording. I’m not sure about their duration on station, but hey, for $500 bucks each you could afford to have dozens of them all over the island and you wouldn’t approach a twentieth of the cost of the Barbados Police Blimp.

So Commissioner Dottin, just fire up that iPad, iPhone or other smartphone, get on the ‘net and order a Parrot UAV for US$500.

You know: Internet. iPad. iPhone. Smartphone.

Commissioner Dottin, you know what I’m talking about, right?

Further Reading

The Nation: Blimp up for repairs

SUN, AUGUST 05, 2012 – 12:09 AM

THE BLIMP that was first deployed to help police keep watch and fight crime five years ago is out of commission for now.

The high-tech, state-of-the-art equipment, which was launched as part of security for Cricket World Cup (CWC) games held at Kensington Oval, is in need of repairs, Commissioner of Police Darwin Dottin has confirmed. Continue reading

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Our lawless beaches: Turtle poachers threaten violence against witnesses

Police absent as killers raid nests, butcher hawksbill turtles right on the beach!

“The field director noted the poachers were getting even bolder and more aggressive, to the point where they were threatening eyewitnesses against making reports to police. So afraid was one person that she only reported an incident to the project three days after the act and she could not be convinced to make a statement to police.”

… from The Nation article Turtles under attack

Editorial by BFP

The increasing reluctance of Bajans to report crimes or to testify in court is directly related to fears of retaliation. People also have an unwillingness to experience the well known abuses of the police and court system towards witnesses, but it is the witness fear factor that is the first barrier to our police when they arrive at a crime scene. There can be two hundred people in a field but nobody ever sees or hears anything – gunshots and screams included.

This lack of confidence in the ability of the police and the courts to protect witnesses from threats and harm is seriously undermining the quality of life in Barbados. There is a general realisation that the lawless elements are becoming bolder as they know too well that the police aren’t likely to come when called, and if the police do come, ordinary folks will say nothing because they are too frightened to become witnesses.

Although judges, lawyers and citizens have been vocal about this disturbing trend of threats and other intimidation tactics against witnesses, neither the government nor the police have done anything to address the problem. In the courts it is still a common occurrence for charges to be dropped with the thin explanation that “the victim no longer desires the charges to proceed”. The judges, lawyers and the DPP never make further serious enquiries as to why the victim has “changed their mind” as I once heard a lawyer tell the court.

Neither have our lawmakers in Parliament seen fit to change the laws to enable judges to force victims and witnesses to testify. This change, combined with prosecutors refusing to drop charges, has proven especially effective in reducing domestic violence in the U.K. and several American jurisdictions we’ve read about.

Epidemic of turtle killing – with no witnesses

This year the grisly turtle remains are turning up everywhere. The Nation reports that the number of known killings so far this nesting season is double that of all last year.

Darren Browne, field director of the Barbados Sea Turtle Project, says that folks are too frightened to call the police because the poachers are threatening witnesses. Mr. Browne invites witnesses to call the Sea Turtle hotline instead of the police and his organization will then call the police. This is supposed to keep the witnesses’ identities from the police, while alerting the authorities so that the police can attend at the scene and try to catch poachers in the act. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Environment, Wildlife

Turks & Caicos Islands actively seeking criminals to be police officers

Have a criminal record? Want a career as a police officer? Head for the Turks & Caicos Islands!

The Royal Turks & Caicos Islands Police is actively seeking criminals to become police officers, this according to our friends over at TCeyeNow blog. We checked with the TCI police website and sure enough, yup… the police force is looking for criminals to become police officers.

“Previous criminal convictions, which must be disclosed, will not necessarily prevent appointment (as a police officer).”

… from the recruiting section of the Royal Turks & Caicos Islands Police

Will wonders never cease? Are things that tough in the recruitment department?

“Any reasonable person would think that the Commissioner of police and his Deputy would be working overtime to restructure the police force, change the recruiting policy and root out the criminal elements in the police force.

Instead the Police force is appealing for more criminals to join the police force.”

from the TCeyeNow article TCI Police Force actively seeking criminals to join the force

And in Barbados…

As a followup in a telephone call to the Royal Barbados Police Force, a recruitment officer told Barbados Free Press that it would be ‘unlikely’ that the organisation would hire anyone with a criminal record to be a police constable but that we were welcome to submit an application. That sounds okay until you stop to consider that there is no blanket prohibition against hiring persons with criminal records.

Standards: If society doesn’t maintain them it all goes to hell.

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Barbados Police Inspector charged in court caper

Allegation: Court records shuffled about to let drug trafficker go free

Recently retired police Inspector Martin Jones was released on bail yesterday after being charged with perverting the course of justice. From the short Nation newspaper article it’s difficult to say exactly what he did, but it looks like some court files were deliberately sent to the wrong court and that drug trafficker Frederick Ryan Grant was not convicted because of this. In addition it is alleged that Jones “facilitated the process by which the order of the court for forthwith cost for trafficking was not complied with by Grant.”

Chief Justice Marston Gibson recently warned that the issue of ‘missing’ and  misplaced court files is a major problem in the Barbados courts, and in conjunction with other problems is creating chaos that threatens our international business sector.

It will be interesting to follow the Martin Jones case through court as I can’t recall ever seeing a Barbados Police Officer ever convicted of corruption offenses. They always seem to walk off free.

Further Reading

We encourage our readers to visit the websites of the Nation and the Barbados Advocate newspapers to view original articles – however we have to reprint entire articles at BFP because those two papers have a record for deleting articles and changing history to suit various government agendas.

Ex-cop on bail (read the story at The Nation here)

A retired police inspector accused of perverting the course of justice in a drug trafficking case was released on bail yesterday. Continue reading

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The shared legacy of Chief Justice Simmons and Commissioner of Police Dottin

Missing and incomplete police court files

Submitted by ‘JW’

Sometimes when things go wrong with the court or with the police, it is a money issue for which the blame should fall squarely on the BLP and DLP politicians who starved the courts and police budgets for two decades.

Sometimes though, what goes wrong is not a money issue or an equipment issue or a lack of laws issue.

Sometimes it’s all about poor leadership and unprofessional management.

This is one of those times.

When court and police management don’t set standards and monitor compliance and performance you can expect exactly this to happen: just as it has been happening for years…

Chaos in the courts

If this sounds like chaos to you, you’re getting the picture. For years Chief Justice Simmons was obsessed with building a shiny new court, and he ignored managing the process in the courts. For years Commissioner of Police Dottin was obsessed with arresting criminals and he ignored managing the prosecution procedures – what happens to the criminals after they are arrested.

The end result is what we have today in 2012: a broken system that could be fixed with a little top-down attention in the courts and the police. It would take leadership and management skills to fix this, and not much of anything else.

I hope our new Chief Justice is listening.

Submitted by JW

Editor’s note: We encourage our readers to visit the Nation News website to read the following newspaper story, but we have to reprint the entire story here because the Nation has proven many times that it deletes or modifies stories to suit political agendas.

Please read The Nation story Call for new police procedures

Call for new police procedures

A lack of files with which to prosecute matters has left the newest magistrate on the Bench upset and calling for new procedures by police.

Magistrate Graveney Bannister said there was no reason why matters from 2009 should be without the relevant documents. Continue reading

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Barbados Police Officer wanted for rape fled island

Missing police officer not on Barbados Most Wanted List

No International Alert issued! Why not?

by WSD

While researching the death of Curtis Callender last week in custody of the Barbados Police, I came across a column in Sunday’s Jamaica Observer reporting that a third police officer fled Barbados in the “Immigration Rape” case that saw two Barbados Police officers charged earlier this year.

The “Immigration Rape” case is unusual because one of the police officers is a female who is alleged to have assisted in the rape. According to the Nation News at the time, Jonathon Birchmore Richard Barrow, 32, of Pasture Road, Haggatt Hall, St Michael, and Melanie Shantelle Lakeisha Denny, 25, of Golden Mile, St Peter, are the two police officers charged. (photos above)

Somehow at the time I missed the news that a third police officer fled Barbados. I couldn’t find anything about the third police officer in the Barbados news media from the time, and I don’t see any police officers on the Barbados “Most Wanted” list. A friend of a friend says the Barbados police didn’t put out an arrest warrant for the missing police officer. I don’t know if that is true or not, but I can’t find anything about the officer.

Why isn’t the missing Barbados Police Officer on the ‘Most Wanted’ list?

Why isn’t there an international alert? Could it be that the Barbados Police don’t want to arrest their fellow officer? Who is he?

How about it, BFP readers… Did you hear about the third officer leaving the island? Does anyone know his name? Why is the man not on the Most Wanted list?

Here is the passage in the Jamaica Observer that alerted me to the missing Barbados police officer who fled the country…

The media also highlighted the case of Shanique Myrie, who was indecently violated in Barbados and another Jamaican woman, who although nabbed with contraband at the Grantley Adams Airport, was allegedly raped and sexually violated while incarcerated in that country.

These stories threw the spotlight on the way Jamaicans and other Caribbean nationals are treated in that sister Caricom country and have forced the Barbadian authorities to act while the world has taken notice of the violations.

In the case of the alleged rape, two Barbadian police officers were arrested and charged and a third has fled that island.

From Observer Online News Editor Karyl Walker’s presentation to this year’s National Journalism Awards ceremony in Kingston, Jamaica

Photo of Barbados Police courtesy of The Nation / Heather-Lynn Evanson

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Why does Barbados pay its police so little?

“The answer seems clear to me – you have to grant Police better Allowances if you want them to stay, you certainly cannot look at Overseas pool of resources to handle crime in Barbados if you are not delivering a better monetary package than where they originate from; and you can’t pay Foreigners better than Locals, so where is the next step?”

Ian Bourne tells Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite that we have a problem attracting and keeping police officers and that the government just doesn’t get it.

For the record, we at BFP agree.

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Oistins: Death in police custody?

CONFIRMED: 30 year old Curtis Callender is the latest to die in police custody.

The Nation newspaper is describing the death as “unnatural”. Well, there’s lots ’bout hey who would call Mr. Callender’s death the most natural thing in Barbados. You don’t want to be arrested for drugs and taken to Oistins drug interview room. No, sir… that’s one place you don’t want to be.

Don’t worry though: the death is being investigated by the Royal Barbados Police Force, so we’re sure to get the truth. (cough, cough) Don’t forget, the RBPF investigates itself all the time and it works out just fine, so fine, fine, fine…

Original Story first published December 2, 2011 @ 3:58am…

No confirmation on this yet folks, so take it with a grain of salt until we have more information. We’re posting it because a few little birdies told us and we know “we” have a problem with unexplained deaths in police custody, unarmed persons shot in the back of the head etc etc etc…

Hello Barbados Free Press,

Apologies for the anonymity, but you know how it is.

I have it on good authority that a man was found dead in the Drug “interview” room at Oistins Police Station yesterday.

Obviously this is not going to make it into the national press – but, seriously, when are the police here going to be held accountable for their actions.  

I have heard quite a bit about their “interview” methods….. seems to be common knowledge – when will they be exposed???

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Zetas Drug Gang agrees with Barbados Police Commissioner: Social media, blogs, are bad!

Barbados Commissioner of Police Darwin Dottin doesn’t mind telling anyone: he hates social media – Facebook, Twitter, forums, blogs – all of it. Our top cop has spoken several times about his negative views on citizens who use social media, most recently a few days ago as documented at Bajan Reporter (story & video).

It looks like Commissioner Dottin has some support for his position from the murderous Zetas Drug Gang in Mexico.

The Zetas drug thugs don’t like social media either, so two days ago they murdered two bloggers and hung their bodies from a bridge to give citizens the message that using social media to communicate with each other about crime is a bad thing to do.

The bloodstained bodies of a man and a woman were found hanging from a bridge in northeast Mexico Tuesday, along with threatening messages to people who report drug violence on social networks.

The messages lay near the two bodies, found half naked, alluding to websites set up for people to report drug violence in the area, police said.

“That will happen to all of them,” read the text of one message signed with the letter ‘Z’ usually associated with the Zetas drug gang.

… from the AFP story Hanging corpses carry threat to Mexico Internet users

Yup, both the Zetas Drug Gang and our Commissioner of Police recognize that social media helps to make their organisations accountable in society. Facebook, Twitter, blogs and discussion forums empower ordinary folks and makes it impossible for those in power to do what they want in secret. The drug gangs and the police can intimidate the news media and individual citizens – but they can’t stop anonymous social media from fairly revealing and criticizing abuses of power, corruption, incompetence, failures and the use of violence by gang members and police officers.

“Like the Zetas Drug Gang, Police Commissioner Dottin hates the lack of control over what people talk about on social media.”

Commissioner Dottin’s police officers have arrested journalists for reporting on police activities, roughed them up, seized cameras, erased videos and covered up police corruption. Barbados police of all ranks regularly intimidate the local news media – but they can’t intimidate anonymous citizens who responsibly use social media and the internet. Like the Zetas Drug Gang, Police Commissioner Dottin hates that lack of control over what people talk about on social media.

Barbados Commissioner of Police remains silent about police corruption revealed on social media

While we’re at it, we’ll reprint this September 10, 2010 invitation to Commissioner Dottin that lists some of the serious police abuses and corruption we’ve spoken about at BFP. So far Commissioner Dottin remains silent, except for his slamming of social media.

Dear Commissioner Dottin,

During your recent press conference, you alluded not only to a recent BFP story, but also to past internet “rumours” as you call them. In light of this we thought we’d mention a few of our previous articles and see if you could clarify the facts for Barbados citizens about police stories that the regular news media either wouldn’t cover or allowed to fade away unresolved.

Sir, this is your chance to specifically address anything that Barbados Free Press has ever printed about you or the RBPF (or anything else) and to speak directly to the same audience without our interference.

Commissioner Dottin, we promise that we will prominently post anything you write to us – unedited and without our comments. If you think any of our stories are inaccurate, upon your request we’ll post your response right with the story so everyone can read it. All we ask is that you send us an email from your RBPF email so we know it’s really you.

And, if there are serious errors in any of our stories, we promise we’ll make changes and publicly apologise to you, the RBPF and any officers we mentioned in the stories.

Here are some of the issues and our related stories that you might like to address. Please feel free to mention any others as well.

1. Bribery and corruption charges dropped against RBPF Sgt. Paul Vaughan (Vaughn) without explanation.

2. Barbados Police outright refusal to investigate arson, and threats of death, arson and rape against foreign investor and hotel owner Adrian Loveridge and his wife.

3. The Royal Barbados Police Force hired corrupt Florida Sheriff Ken Jenne and his associates to provide training and equipment to our police officers. This corrupt bunch got mixed up in kickbacks, fraud, tax evasion and money laundering – some of it in relation to work done for the RBPF.

4. Passersby and innocent people shot by Barbados Police officers.

5. Police Sargeant Paul Vaughan (Vaughn) collecting unpaid rent for Director of Public Prosecutions Charles Leacock. A blank, pre-signed search warrant was used, and a woman’s vagina was searched for back-rent money.

6. Refusal of Barbados Police to investigate violent threats against witnesses in trial.

7. Failure of Barbados Police to implement a zero tolerance policy on spousal abuse, and to take spousal abuse seriously.

8. Failure of the Barbados Police to stop the Boscobel Road Toll Gang.

9. Failure of Barbados Police to uphold the law at Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary & RAMSAR protected wetlands.

10. Barbados Police are a law unto themselves in respect of wiretapping phone calls. There are no controls and no oversight by the judiciary or any independent body.

Here’s the list again with links to our stories… >>> Continue reading

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