Category Archives: Environment

Stop building on Buccament Bay flood plain – Death is coming again

Ricky Small cries for his dear wife Joselle, who was taken by the raging waters at Buccament Bay Resort.

Ricky Small cries for his dear wife Joselle, who was taken by the raging waters at Buccament Bay Resort.

by Peter Binose

The private housing development along the Buccament River, in fact beside the Buccament river in the flood plain, was going full speed when I visited last week. Express work is taking place on finishing about a dozen further units, with all stages in progress from start up on.

I walked with a family member of the land owners and builders, who told me the family is worried that they may be stopped from building. But he thought perhaps because of the relationship between them and the ULP leadership they had some considerable protection.

Considering the devastation caused by the December 2013 flooding it is unbelievable, perhaps even criminal, that the government has not stopped further building in an area which has been recorded as a disaster zone for centuries. The area is an ancient and modern floodplain, as shown by the follow records going back to 1876!  Continue reading

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Filed under Building Collapse, Disaster, Environment, Offshore Investments, Real Estate

Typical: 1/ Wall off the coast. 2/ Provide no parking for beach-goers. 3/ Advertise the beach to tourists.

Barbados Beach Problems (click photo for large)

Tear down these walls!

It’s a good thing there is no truth in advertising, for instead of showing the usual photos of bikini clad lovelies frolicking on the Bajan sand between blue sea and green foliage, we’d have to show a wall of concrete condos blocking the sun and the view – with nary a path for people to find their way to the beach.

Parking? You mek sport! Why would our esteemed leaders ever give a care to provide parking spots near the very beaches upon which this island’s economy depends?

Fools they are, and fools we are for letting them continue to sell every last piece of land with not a thought about what happens when large stretches of beach are inaccessible except to the few elites who can afford to live right there.

Unfinished concrete skeletons dot the coast. TEAR DOWN THESE WALLS and let the people access the beach!

Beach Bummer

IT IS fast becoming one of the most popular beaches in Barbados, especially among visitors, but there is a snag.

The beach, located along the busy highway at The Garden, St James, has no parking space. As a result, visitors park their vehicles along Storehouse Gap, just opposite the road leading to the beach, resulting in the two-lane road being restricted to one lane for traffic going in both directions…

Read it all in The Nation

(and thanks to The Nation for the photo)

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Economy, Environment, Real Estate

Why no solution on the Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary?

Barbados Graeme Hall Sluice Gate (click photo for large)

Deliberate destruction of a RAMSAR Treaty natural wetlands

The last mangrove swamp in Barbados is being deliberately destroyed by the Barbados government – so that private interests (read ‘friends of the ruling party’) can benefit financially by squeezing out the foreign philanthropist / owner and then developing the area into condominiums and industrial parks. This is not an unheard of scenario in Barbados, especially with agricultural lands and natural / scrub / coastal areas. It also is common for landowners to spend decades trying to re-classify agricultural and other natural lands for development, only to be refused time and time again.

Then some person will come along and offer just a little bit over the agricultural value and the discouraged and beaten owner will sell. A few weeks later, the land is approved for development and quickly resold for a hundred times what was paid. That is the real Barbados!

The only problem with the Graeme Hall swamp is that the owner, a Canadian philanthropist named Peter Allard, doesn’t want to develop the area: he wants to preserve this precious natural resource for the Bajan people. Earlier Allard volunteered to have the Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary incorporated into a National Park. That didn’t work out when the greedy hands of career politicians wanted their cut or NO DEAL! Now that political elite is determined to have it all.

It might take more twenty more years for the cabals to get hold of what is probably the most valuable land on the south coast, but the elites think in generations and they know that there are other foreign chickens to pluck until that time arrives. The elites own the courts and the government, so they have plenty of time.  Continue reading

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Filed under Agriculture, Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Environment, Nature, Offshore Investments, Political Corruption, Wildlife

A day late and a dollar short…

By Janelle Riley-Thornhill

Over the last few years it seems that we have been losing more and more open windows to the sea along the South, and particularly the West Coast of the island, and many persons have expressed concern about this limited beach access and the impact it has been having on Barbadians…

…Preserving our windows to the sea

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Environment

Bridgetown Careenage and Harbour beautiful… but deadly to Sea Turtles

Honey Bea Fishing Barbados

Honey Bea III refuses to answer accusation of fishing for turtles

Contributed by BFP reader CJB

The Careenage and Harbour used to be a garbage strewn muddy dump. They have spent years cleaning it up and landscaping the surrounds. They have even restored the lift bridge to working order. However now that the area has been cleaned up and the water is far less murky (polluted?) turtles have started to appear, largely attracted by the free food from the deep-sea fishing boats moored there.

Unfortunately some of the deep-sea fishing vessels are now also trying to catch the turtles with rod, line and hook. The boat we saw was Honey Bee III. (Editor’s note: I think he means Honey Bea III)

They had a rope over the side with what looked like the entrails of a large fish at the end of it – two Hawksbill turtles were attempting to get bits off it. One was an adult, another a juvenile. However there was another conventional fishing rod and line with hook also dangling in the water. It was baited with fish – quite why it was there is a moot point. It was this that the adult turtle got caught on – obviously attracted to the bait on the hook. There was quite a struggle by one of the guys to ‘land’ it and the rod bent right down. Eventually the turtle surfaced and its head broke the water – my photo in hi-res clearly shows the line from the rod to the hook in its beak.

Then the line snapped and the turtles (both) swam off. The two staff carried on gutting a barracuda as though nothing had happened. The whole incident also witnessed by a number of tourists.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Environment, Nature, Wildlife

Daughters of the Niger Delta “The oil has spoiled everything for us…”

BFP has been invited to see this documentary on Saturday March 8th. We’ll let you know what we think. Here is a description from the film’s website:

Daughters of the Niger Delta
Documentary (55:30 min)

Daughters of the Niger Delta is an intimate film portrait of three everyday heroines who manage to make ends meet against all odds. As their personal stories unfold, we come to see that the widely ignored environmental pollution in their backyard is not the only human rights issue affecting their lives.

The Stories

The film radically differs from the usual media reports about oil outputs, conflict, and kidnapping. It gives a taste of everyday life in the Niger Delta through the eyes of three ordinary women: Hannah, Naomi & Rebecca. Their struggle to survive in the delta’s beautiful but pollution-marred wetlands confronts us with the human impact of corporate irresponsibility, gender injustice, and failing government service delivery.

The stories of Hannah, Naomi, and Rebecca are sobering as well as uplifting. They shed light on day-to-day injustices that we rarely hear about in the news. But they also highlight women’s strength and resilience. Despite the hardship affecting their lives, the filmed women are determined to give their children a better future. Women may be the best captains to navigate the Niger Delta out of its troubled waters – if only they were given the chance.

Women’s Voices

It’s time to listen to women’s voices. Their priorities are relevant not only for the Niger Delta, but also for other parts of Nigeria that currently are marred by violence and social unrest. Women’s experiences can enrich the policy discourse – if only we are willing to listen.

Film website: Daughters of the Niger Delta

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Filed under Africa, Disaster, Environment, Human Rights

Life is hard for Sea Turtle hatchlings

Barbados Sea Turtle Release

We love to see the hatchling releases by the UWI Sea Turtle Project, but a photo of a Dolphin (Mahi Mahi) being cleaned reminds us that only a few turtles survive the first few days in the sea. The lucky or smart ones are few.

Sea turtle hatchling Barbados

All the more reason to immediately report anyone you see killing an adult turtle. There was a time when sea turtles were like the stars in the sky around Bim. Not anymore.

Each one of us has a responsibility to protect and grow our sea turtle population.

Thanks to Skip to Malou and the Barbados Sea Turtle Project for the photos and links.

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Filed under Barbados, Environment, Wildlife