Category Archives: Culture & Race Issues

Kathy and Henderson Nicholls – still happy and working hard

Barbados Mixed Marriage

A little over four years ago, Marcus did a story about Kathy Rockel, a white girl from Colorado USA who came to Barbados as part of a medical-transcription business. The business eventually went bust because Barbados just couldn’t compete competitively in the world market against places like India where people work for money that wouldn’t even buy food here.

Kathy and Henderson in 2010

Kathy and Henderson in 2010

But the focus of BFP’s story about Kathy is that while in Barbados she met and fell in love with Henderson Nicholls – a Bajan who follows the Rastafarian faith. They married and off they went to the USA.

I wondered how they were doing these years later. After all, about 50% of marriages fail anyway, nevermind the different races, religions and cultures between Kathy and Henderson.

So how are they doing?

Fine. Ever so fine!

Good for them. There is hope in the world.

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Race

Muslim-only housing development in Barbados. No Christians or Jews allowed to purchase homes in new community.

Muslim Barbados housing

Muslim Association says “Barbadians have nothing to fear.” (What a statement!)

Is this what we want for our Barbados?

It's not a real sign, but it might as well be!

It’s not a real sign, but it might as well be!

One can only imagine the howls of outrage if a construction company announced that only Christians would be allowed to purchase new homes in a brand new Bajan subdivision… and rightly so. Can you imagine on a sign “No Muslim Buyers Allowed” ???

Yet this is exactly what our political class has agreed to in relation to Bajan Christians and Jews when it issued building permissions to the Muslim organisations involved in building Barbados’ newest housing development.

After hundreds of years of slavery, and then another hundred years of colonisation, exclusion and segregation based upon race, skin colour and class, ordinary Barbadians do not take kindly to being told they are not eligible to purchase a home because they are not of the proper religion. Bajans do not like being told that they are second class citizens in their own country.

The message from the Muslim spokespersons that “Barbadians have nothing to fear” is a statement that these people consider themselves to be outside of the wide and inclusive Barbados citizenship and community. Is this what we want for our Barbados?

Muslims wish to self-enclave, to not be part of the wider Bajan community

Muslim schools in Barbados teach our young people that “Hijab is compulsory… hide woman’s beauty as protection from rape” and “Beheading, chopping off your hands, severe beatings are Islamic rules, nothing wrong in it” (See BFP’s article about the Muslim Girls School.)

There can be no debate that these Islamic values and teachings are anti-Bajan, and destructive to our national character. They are against everything that this country stands for. Muslim teaching about the value of women is stuck somewhere before the dark-ages, but for some reason liberals excuse the fact that the Koran not only allows, but instructs, husbands to physically discipline their wives.

Yet, our so-called political leadership has agreed to allow the establishment of a community that excludes ordinary Bajans and upholds values that are foreign and destructive to our nation.

This is a dangerous precedent that weakens Barbados and undermines everything we have struggled for in the past 150 years. By all means, let people believe what they want to believe no matter how vile or outrageous. Freedom and democracy demands tolerance. But we draw the line when our government gives approval and support to an exclusionary enclave based upon religion and values that are in total opposition to the Bajan culture and national character.

I wonder: what would Bussa think of this?

From The Nation newspaper. We have to reprint it all because that newspaper has a habit of revising history:

HOUSING VENTURE

A new community exclusively for Muslims has been started at Clermont, St James.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Religion

A bit ‘o Barbados history: Walter Tull, first black British Army officer died at Somme Valley, France 1918

Walter_Tull

“There were military laws forbidding ‘any negro or person of colour’ being commissioned as an officer, despite this, Walter was promoted to lieutenant in 1917.”

Royal Mint to issue coin to honour the first black British Army officer

Walter Daniel John Tull was born on April 28, 1888 in Folkestone, Kent, England – the son of Barbadian carpenter Daniel Tull and Kent-born Alice Elizabeth Palmer. Orphaned at about seven years old, he was raised in an orphanage. The start of World War I found Tull doing quite well as a professional footballer, but he volunteered to serve and in 1916 fought in the Battle of the Somme, rising to the rank of Sergeant.

You have to understand that a negro/person of colour was not allowed to command white soldiers, but because of the need and Tull’s talent and earned respect, he was placed in charge of white soldiers and eventually promoted to lieutenant.

Tull was machine gunned to death on March 25, 2918. According to reports, several of his men (white soldiers all) tried to recover his body but could not due to the battle. His body was never found and Tull remains on the field of battle with thousands of his comrades.

There are efforts to recognize Walter Tull with a statue or a belated medal, but perhaps the best recognition is for Bajans to tell his story to others.

For the interested, here is where you can find a little more depth and details…

Wikipedia: Walter Tull

Walter Tull Sports Association: Who is Walter Tull?

The Guardian: Walter Tull, the first black officer in the British army, to feature on £5 coin

Our thanks to our old friend Christopher for reminding us of Walter Tull.

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History, Military, Race

Liars in our Caribbean leadership

by Peter Binose

Some people lie to get attention. Some lie because they are mentally ill, some lie for narcissistic reason. Some lie because they are pure evil. Others lie to make others think that they are worthy, while some lie to mislead, confuse and deceive. Another group lies to avoid the expected punishment.   

I believe that several of our Caribbean leaders are serial liars, and they lie for all the above reasons.

Those who speak lies often write lies and should not be trusted in law courts to give truthful evidence. They should not be trusted to draw wills, contracts or agreements of any kind. In fact their profession should never be in a position of trust.

This might sound strange but in fact a large percentage of people that lie, they lie initially to themselves, even believe the lies just because they are too afraid to face the truth.

Many psychological researchers have proven that people who lie to themselves tend to believe the lies later on, and then convince others that the lie is the truth.  Continue reading

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Filed under Celebrities, Culture & Race Issues, Island Life, Politics & Corruption

Time for the Barbados Revegetation and Restoration Act

Barbados Sugar Cane.jpg

by Born B’badian

Bajans used to have big mouths, and gossip would spread faster than lightning.  It worked to help keep people straight, cause nobody wanted to be known as a crook or a thief. But reputations dont matter anymore in Bim. Furthermore, Bajans so busy buying and building bigass houses they can’t afford to furnish properly, and bussing their behinds to pay for, that they do not pay attention to what is going on in the country.

Bajans were never victims like I see now. They were always quick to open they mouth and cuss you out or land somebody a blow longside their head for doing them wrong. But now, the process has changed where people putting well known fall down drunks to run the country and crooked lawyers to handle the money matters of the country. The old people who sweat in the canefields to make Barbados a good place to live must be ready to jump out the grave with a fresh tamarind rod to beat everybody behind.

The people in Bim who still living sweet, are the ones who fix their little house good, and still have money in their pocket. They still planting a little kitchen garden and some fruit trees, instead of wasting precious land with front lawn. It is a sin to be importing vegetables and fruit, even seasonings from other islands while only grass growing on a big patch of land, taking up water, and keeping the place hotter than the devil’s hell.

Bajan’s got to stop letting foreigners buy their land, its the only thing we really own. People can’t go to Singapore and do this. Errol Barrow, God rest his soul, tried to base Barbados off of Singapore, but the current corrupt in power let toutmebackIlah samcouche and the duppy, get citizenship, buy land and do whatever they want on the island. Of course, bajan’s vote them in like loyal beggars blinded by cornbeef politics.  Ain’t no community spirit anymore, cause everybody lockup in their big house hiding that they eating saltfish and breadfruit and can’t pay the bills, or thiefing and whoring to pay them bills. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Environment

Why a restaurant worker’s selfie photo with Robert Van Persie was bad for Barbados

Robert-Van-Persie selfie with hotel worker

Photo controversy has a big message for Bajans: Remember what made Barbados the choice of the rich and famous – and how we all benefited from our image.

Frank Sinatra would have understood why The Cliff Restaurant suspended employee Kyson Forde for asking Manchester United striker Robert Van Persie to take a photo with him.

Back in 1967 BFP’s Auntie Moses had an encounter with the famous Rat Pack member (as told by Marcus. God, how I miss him)…

“The super rich and famous have always had their gates and guards, and I guess I don’t begrudge them a little privacy. Shona’s Auntie Moses tells a fabulous story about meeting Frank Sinatra when he ran into the kitchen where she was working. Auntie Moses and her friends hid Frankie in a walk-in cooler for a few minutes until his need passed. Then he talked with the staff for half an hour, had a beer and gave all the girls a big kiss before he left. He also sent autographed photos the next day. (Certainly a different profile of Sinatra’s character than one might think by reading some other accounts. Auntie Moses hasn’t washed that cheek since 1967!)”

… from BFP’s Rich and Not-So-Rich Brits Flock To Barbados Gated Communities

This island used to be the first choice for the rich and famous of the world. There were reasons for that – our pristine beaches, some upscale accommodations, and most important the Bajan ‘doan care who you are, everybody is welcome’ attitude. You are rich? Famous? Who cares? Never heard of you and even if I did, have a rum and a cutter.

Now everybody has a camera in their phone. It’s not much of a proper camera but everybody has one and feels obliged to record everything. Are we better for it as people and society? I don’t think so.

The rich and famous came here partially because Barbados offered as much privacy and anonymity as possible in a vacation destination. Within walls and upscale hotels, the rich and famous could relax and not worry that their every movement and word would be reported. (That went for the Royal Family too, although it didn’t work out all that well for Princess Margaret and her toyboy.)

Kyson Forde was suspended because he forgot that Mr. Van Persie was our guest – not only at The Cliff Restaurant, but on this island. Mr. Van Persie was good enough to stand for the photo, but he was probably thinking very unkind thoughts about The Cliff and his vacation in Barbados. It’s part of the Bajan deal with the rich and famous: we don’t make a big deal of our guests.

There are many qualities of our culture and business sense that we’ve lost over the years, and the ability to not see anything when appropriate is one of those lost Bajan qualities.

Barbados still has the qualities that attracted the rich and famous for the last 50 years – but we’re losing them. You know we are. I won’t list them all here but think about the changes to our environment and culture. Any Bajan knows what has changed so I won’t go into it further right now.

Congratulations to the management of The Cliff Restaurant for maintaining our standards, and in doing so protecting the reputation of our country. The mainstream media covered Kyson Forde’s suspension extensively, and that probably did far more to promote our tourism product to the rich and famous than anything else this year.

And a big welcome back to Kyson Forde after his suspension. Hopefully he has done some thinking about his job. If not, there are a hundred others who will apply for his position.

Further Reading

Waiter suspended for snapping pictures with Van Persie

Mirror UK: Robin Van Persie almost selfie costs Barbados waiter his job.

 

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues

Prince of Wales who later betrayed his duty, disliked Barbados, found ‘coloured population revolting’. That’s okay, we didn’t care much for racist Edward VIII either!

HMS Renown Barbados

(HMS Renown, Barbados 1919 – click photo for large)

‘There are over 170,000 of them the white population is very small and they aren’t much to look at all too deadly dull and of course depressingly primitive.’

Local scenery ‘ugly’, ‘coloured population revolting’, Barbados a ‘bum place’

… Edward VIII, Prince of Wales, talks about Barbados and Bajans in letters to his friend’s wife in the Mail Online

Royal adulterer wrote to his mistress – who was someone else’s wife

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

It takes a special kind of man to be photographed with a friend – knowing that you are secretly banging his adulterous wife.

Apparently the spoiled royal brat Edward VIII was that kind of man.

Edward was also a vile racist, according to recently offered letters written by the then Prince of Wales on a goodwill tour to Barbados in 1920.

Concern for his fellow man? Empathy? Ha! When a man was lost at sea on the HMS Renown (history link), Edward wrote to his friend’s wife: “Of course one man’s death means nothing.”

The little shit later went on to abdicate his throne and duty to Britain and the Empire for another piece of quiff – American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

When I think of all the good he could have done in his life, or at least could have tried to do, and how self-centered his choices were – Edward VIII seems nothing but a pathetic excuse for a man.

Reading his letters, as a proud Bajan I can say that Edward VIII wasn’t fit to clean Bajan toilets, let alone be our monarch.

contributed by Passin thru

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History