Category Archives: Culture & Race Issues

Liars in our Caribbean leadership

by Peter Binose

Some people lie to get attention. Some lie because they are mentally ill, some lie for narcissistic reason. Some lie because they are pure evil. Others lie to make others think that they are worthy, while some lie to mislead, confuse and deceive. Another group lies to avoid the expected punishment.   

I believe that several of our Caribbean leaders are serial liars, and they lie for all the above reasons.

Those who speak lies often write lies and should not be trusted in law courts to give truthful evidence. They should not be trusted to draw wills, contracts or agreements of any kind. In fact their profession should never be in a position of trust.

This might sound strange but in fact a large percentage of people that lie, they lie initially to themselves, even believe the lies just because they are too afraid to face the truth.

Many psychological researchers have proven that people who lie to themselves tend to believe the lies later on, and then convince others that the lie is the truth.  Continue reading

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Filed under Celebrities, Culture & Race Issues, Island Life, Politics & Corruption

Time for the Barbados Revegetation and Restoration Act

Barbados Sugar Cane.jpg

by Born B’badian

Bajans used to have big mouths, and gossip would spread faster than lightning.  It worked to help keep people straight, cause nobody wanted to be known as a crook or a thief. But reputations dont matter anymore in Bim. Furthermore, Bajans so busy buying and building bigass houses they can’t afford to furnish properly, and bussing their behinds to pay for, that they do not pay attention to what is going on in the country.

Bajans were never victims like I see now. They were always quick to open they mouth and cuss you out or land somebody a blow longside their head for doing them wrong. But now, the process has changed where people putting well known fall down drunks to run the country and crooked lawyers to handle the money matters of the country. The old people who sweat in the canefields to make Barbados a good place to live must be ready to jump out the grave with a fresh tamarind rod to beat everybody behind.

The people in Bim who still living sweet, are the ones who fix their little house good, and still have money in their pocket. They still planting a little kitchen garden and some fruit trees, instead of wasting precious land with front lawn. It is a sin to be importing vegetables and fruit, even seasonings from other islands while only grass growing on a big patch of land, taking up water, and keeping the place hotter than the devil’s hell.

Bajan’s got to stop letting foreigners buy their land, its the only thing we really own. People can’t go to Singapore and do this. Errol Barrow, God rest his soul, tried to base Barbados off of Singapore, but the current corrupt in power let toutmebackIlah samcouche and the duppy, get citizenship, buy land and do whatever they want on the island. Of course, bajan’s vote them in like loyal beggars blinded by cornbeef politics.  Ain’t no community spirit anymore, cause everybody lockup in their big house hiding that they eating saltfish and breadfruit and can’t pay the bills, or thiefing and whoring to pay them bills. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Environment

Why a restaurant worker’s selfie photo with Robert Van Persie was bad for Barbados

Robert-Van-Persie selfie with hotel worker

Photo controversy has a big message for Bajans: Remember what made Barbados the choice of the rich and famous – and how we all benefited from our image.

Frank Sinatra would have understood why The Cliff Restaurant suspended employee Kyson Forde for asking Manchester United striker Robert Van Persie to take a photo with him.

Back in 1967 BFP’s Auntie Moses had an encounter with the famous Rat Pack member (as told by Marcus. God, how I miss him)…

“The super rich and famous have always had their gates and guards, and I guess I don’t begrudge them a little privacy. Shona’s Auntie Moses tells a fabulous story about meeting Frank Sinatra when he ran into the kitchen where she was working. Auntie Moses and her friends hid Frankie in a walk-in cooler for a few minutes until his need passed. Then he talked with the staff for half an hour, had a beer and gave all the girls a big kiss before he left. He also sent autographed photos the next day. (Certainly a different profile of Sinatra’s character than one might think by reading some other accounts. Auntie Moses hasn’t washed that cheek since 1967!)”

… from BFP’s Rich and Not-So-Rich Brits Flock To Barbados Gated Communities

This island used to be the first choice for the rich and famous of the world. There were reasons for that – our pristine beaches, some upscale accommodations, and most important the Bajan ‘doan care who you are, everybody is welcome’ attitude. You are rich? Famous? Who cares? Never heard of you and even if I did, have a rum and a cutter.

Now everybody has a camera in their phone. It’s not much of a proper camera but everybody has one and feels obliged to record everything. Are we better for it as people and society? I don’t think so.

The rich and famous came here partially because Barbados offered as much privacy and anonymity as possible in a vacation destination. Within walls and upscale hotels, the rich and famous could relax and not worry that their every movement and word would be reported. (That went for the Royal Family too, although it didn’t work out all that well for Princess Margaret and her toyboy.)

Kyson Forde was suspended because he forgot that Mr. Van Persie was our guest – not only at The Cliff Restaurant, but on this island. Mr. Van Persie was good enough to stand for the photo, but he was probably thinking very unkind thoughts about The Cliff and his vacation in Barbados. It’s part of the Bajan deal with the rich and famous: we don’t make a big deal of our guests.

There are many qualities of our culture and business sense that we’ve lost over the years, and the ability to not see anything when appropriate is one of those lost Bajan qualities.

Barbados still has the qualities that attracted the rich and famous for the last 50 years – but we’re losing them. You know we are. I won’t list them all here but think about the changes to our environment and culture. Any Bajan knows what has changed so I won’t go into it further right now.

Congratulations to the management of The Cliff Restaurant for maintaining our standards, and in doing so protecting the reputation of our country. The mainstream media covered Kyson Forde’s suspension extensively, and that probably did far more to promote our tourism product to the rich and famous than anything else this year.

And a big welcome back to Kyson Forde after his suspension. Hopefully he has done some thinking about his job. If not, there are a hundred others who will apply for his position.

Further Reading

Waiter suspended for snapping pictures with Van Persie

Mirror UK: Robin Van Persie almost selfie costs Barbados waiter his job.

 

39 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues

Prince of Wales who later betrayed his duty, disliked Barbados, found ‘coloured population revolting’. That’s okay, we didn’t care much for racist Edward VIII either!

HMS Renown Barbados

(HMS Renown, Barbados 1919 – click photo for large)

‘There are over 170,000 of them the white population is very small and they aren’t much to look at all too deadly dull and of course depressingly primitive.’

Local scenery ‘ugly’, ‘coloured population revolting’, Barbados a ‘bum place’

… Edward VIII, Prince of Wales, talks about Barbados and Bajans in letters to his friend’s wife in the Mail Online

Royal adulterer wrote to his mistress – who was someone else’s wife

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

It takes a special kind of man to be photographed with a friend – knowing that you are secretly banging his adulterous wife.

Apparently the spoiled royal brat Edward VIII was that kind of man.

Edward was also a vile racist, according to recently offered letters written by the then Prince of Wales on a goodwill tour to Barbados in 1920.

Concern for his fellow man? Empathy? Ha! When a man was lost at sea on the HMS Renown (history link), Edward wrote to his friend’s wife: “Of course one man’s death means nothing.”

The little shit later went on to abdicate his throne and duty to Britain and the Empire for another piece of quiff – American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

When I think of all the good he could have done in his life, or at least could have tried to do, and how self-centered his choices were – Edward VIII seems nothing but a pathetic excuse for a man.

Reading his letters, as a proud Bajan I can say that Edward VIII wasn’t fit to clean Bajan toilets, let alone be our monarch.

contributed by Passin thru

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History

How Bridgetown built the economic foundation of the British Empire – only to be discarded when the profits were gone.

Barbados_Slave_License2.jpg

Slavery Reparations have never interested me because I know that whatever we receive will never be enough for the victims class, and that anything we do receive will be stolen by the political class. No reparations will ever touch my hand. No amount of reparations will provide a steady flow of clean water from my pipes or establish a modern sustainable economy.

Britain could pay us 10 billion pounds and not one new hospital bed or surgery will appear at that slum we call the Queen Elizabeth Hospital – or anywhere else. A trillion pounds will not erase the arrogance of government employees towards citizens, nor will it cure the ‘Island Time’ syndrome that makes foreign business investors run like mad from the Caribbean once they get over the rum, sun and sand.

Barbados is incapable of receiving and delivering reparations honestly and effectively for the general good.

Whose fault is that? I’m not sure, but I do know that at one time Barbados was the driving economic force and secure military base that built and maintained the British Empire.

Whatever Tristram Hunt has written in his new book Ten Cities that Made an Empire, he’s probably 50% correct and 50% nonsense. After all this time, who can say?

But I look forward to the read.

Cliverton

Ten Cities that Made an Empire by Tristram Hunt, review: ‘enthralling and compelling’

A fascinating account of 10 cities that were shaped by, and helped shape, British rule

Bridgetown, Barbados has always held a particular appeal for the British. The legacy of empire is all too apparent, and is, indeed, exploited for tourists. The series of historical attractions based on Plantation House present, as Tristram Hunt writes, “a sepia version of the colonial past”. Nostalgia for cricket, rum cocktails and the old plantation lifestyle trumps the blood-drenched history of slavery on the island. Bridgetown is a modern city, but the colonial memory continues to reverberate.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Human Rights, Slavery

Benjamin Moore Paints used racially offensive colour names – Is ‘Nazi Red’ okay?

Benjamin Moore Paints Lawsuit

(click photo for large)

An interesting story is breaking in New Jersey where Clinton Tucker, a black employee of Benjamin Moore Paints, has launched a lawsuit claiming that the company apparently named various paint colours after him – allegedly just to disparage his race – and then fired him when he complained.

Mr. Tucker also took exception to the company’s naming of ‘Confederate Red’. While Mr. Tucker found the paint names ‘Tucker Chocolate’ and ‘Clinton Brown’ repulsive (he had worked on these colours before they were named), his white supervisors laughed at him – so Mr. Tucker says in his lawsuit.

Benjamin Moore’s website states that the colours were named after Mr. St. George Tucker in 1798 “for his home facing Courthouse Green” in Williamsburg.

Hmmmmm…. I wonder when that was added to Benjamin Moore’s website.

And to top it off, Benjamin Moore’s ‘Confederate Red’ page says:

Benjamin Moore Flag

Benjamin Moore’s Confederate Red

This rich, refined red is a timeless and enduring classic. A great accent wall color, it is not too bold and won’t overpower a room.

Hmmmmmm. To some folks, myself included, Confederate Red invokes the same thoughts as if the colour was named ‘National Socialist Red’ and said “This rich, refined red is a timeless and enduring classic…”   Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Race

Barbados Red Legs flag – A symbol of cultural affirmation

Barbados Red Legs Flag

Barbados Red-Legs can now boast their own cultural flag

“I know as an outsider, no symbology can be foisted onto another culture;

yet my humble offering might spark the imagination of someone who is from there, and inspire some movement toward cultural affirmation.”

contributed by Three-fold Now

The Red Legs are a cultural community in the Caribbean island of Barbados. They are descendants of Irish and Scottish indentured servants—some forcibly enslaved by Cromwell—and remain as “poor whites” in what is otherwise a predominantly Afro-Caribbean nation. The performer Rihanna claims some family ties to this Irish-Barbadian lineage.  Continue reading

30 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Slavery