Category Archives: Culture & Race Issues

Prince of Wales who later betrayed his duty, disliked Barbados, found ‘coloured population revolting’. That’s okay, we didn’t care much for racist Edward VIII either!

HMS Renown Barbados

(HMS Renown, Barbados 1919 – click photo for large)

‘There are over 170,000 of them the white population is very small and they aren’t much to look at all too deadly dull and of course depressingly primitive.’

Local scenery ‘ugly’, ‘coloured population revolting’, Barbados a ‘bum place’

… Edward VIII, Prince of Wales, talks about Barbados and Bajans in letters to his friend’s wife in the Mail Online

Royal adulterer wrote to his mistress – who was someone else’s wife

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

It takes a special kind of man to be photographed with a friend – knowing that you are secretly banging his adulterous wife.

Apparently the spoiled royal brat Edward VIII was that kind of man.

Edward was also a vile racist, according to recently offered letters written by the then Prince of Wales on a goodwill tour to Barbados in 1920.

Concern for his fellow man? Empathy? Ha! When a man was lost at sea on the HMS Renown (history link), Edward wrote to his friend’s wife: “Of course one man’s death means nothing.”

The little shit later went on to abdicate his throne and duty to Britain and the Empire for another piece of quiff – American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

When I think of all the good he could have done in his life, or at least could have tried to do, and how self-centered his choices were – Edward VIII seems nothing but a pathetic excuse for a man.

Reading his letters, as a proud Bajan I can say that Edward VIII wasn’t fit to clean Bajan toilets, let alone be our monarch.

contributed by Passin thru

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History

How Bridgetown built the economic foundation of the British Empire – only to be discarded when the profits were gone.

Barbados_Slave_License2.jpg

Slavery Reparations have never interested me because I know that whatever we receive will never be enough for the victims class, and that anything we do receive will be stolen by the political class. No reparations will ever touch my hand. No amount of reparations will provide a steady flow of clean water from my pipes or establish a modern sustainable economy.

Britain could pay us 10 billion pounds and not one new hospital bed or surgery will appear at that slum we call the Queen Elizabeth Hospital – or anywhere else. A trillion pounds will not erase the arrogance of government employees towards citizens, nor will it cure the ‘Island Time’ syndrome that makes foreign business investors run like mad from the Caribbean once they get over the rum, sun and sand.

Barbados is incapable of receiving and delivering reparations honestly and effectively for the general good.

Whose fault is that? I’m not sure, but I do know that at one time Barbados was the driving economic force and secure military base that built and maintained the British Empire.

Whatever Tristram Hunt has written in his new book Ten Cities that Made an Empire, he’s probably 50% correct and 50% nonsense. After all this time, who can say?

But I look forward to the read.

Cliverton

Ten Cities that Made an Empire by Tristram Hunt, review: ‘enthralling and compelling’

A fascinating account of 10 cities that were shaped by, and helped shape, British rule

Bridgetown, Barbados has always held a particular appeal for the British. The legacy of empire is all too apparent, and is, indeed, exploited for tourists. The series of historical attractions based on Plantation House present, as Tristram Hunt writes, “a sepia version of the colonial past”. Nostalgia for cricket, rum cocktails and the old plantation lifestyle trumps the blood-drenched history of slavery on the island. Bridgetown is a modern city, but the colonial memory continues to reverberate.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Human Rights, Slavery

Benjamin Moore Paints used racially offensive colour names – Is ‘Nazi Red’ okay?

Benjamin Moore Paints Lawsuit

(click photo for large)

An interesting story is breaking in New Jersey where Clinton Tucker, a black employee of Benjamin Moore Paints, has launched a lawsuit claiming that the company apparently named various paint colours after him – allegedly just to disparage his race – and then fired him when he complained.

Mr. Tucker also took exception to the company’s naming of ‘Confederate Red’. While Mr. Tucker found the paint names ‘Tucker Chocolate’ and ‘Clinton Brown’ repulsive (he had worked on these colours before they were named), his white supervisors laughed at him – so Mr. Tucker says in his lawsuit.

Benjamin Moore’s website states that the colours were named after Mr. St. George Tucker in 1798 “for his home facing Courthouse Green” in Williamsburg.

Hmmmmm…. I wonder when that was added to Benjamin Moore’s website.

And to top it off, Benjamin Moore’s ‘Confederate Red’ page says:

Benjamin Moore Flag

Benjamin Moore’s Confederate Red

This rich, refined red is a timeless and enduring classic. A great accent wall color, it is not too bold and won’t overpower a room.

Hmmmmmm. To some folks, myself included, Confederate Red invokes the same thoughts as if the colour was named ‘National Socialist Red’ and said “This rich, refined red is a timeless and enduring classic…”   Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Race

Barbados Red Legs flag – A symbol of cultural affirmation

Barbados Red Legs Flag

Barbados Red-Legs can now boast their own cultural flag

“I know as an outsider, no symbology can be foisted onto another culture;

yet my humble offering might spark the imagination of someone who is from there, and inspire some movement toward cultural affirmation.”

contributed by Three-fold Now

The Red Legs are a cultural community in the Caribbean island of Barbados. They are descendants of Irish and Scottish indentured servants—some forcibly enslaved by Cromwell—and remain as “poor whites” in what is otherwise a predominantly Afro-Caribbean nation. The performer Rihanna claims some family ties to this Irish-Barbadian lineage.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Slavery

Graves Of Barbados – Respect and Love For Our Families, Our Friends and Our History… Or NOT!

BFP:

Barbados Cemetery History

More discarded human bones, coffins at Barbados Cemetery

Updated June 18, 2014

Once again it’s time to report on the latest indignities to buried friends and relatives. Every six months we read of another ‘find’ in this churchyard or that: human skulls, coffin parts, bones of the dead still dressed in their burial clothing. The latest is in The Nation: Relative jolted by scene at cemetery.

We’ve destroyed all the historical buildings we can on this rock. Practically nothing remains of our slave history.

Practically nothing remains of the military forts and bases that ringed this island right up to the cold war. Now we destroy our generational history and disrespect our friends and family members. Every person for themselves! Full speed ahead with that new iPhone or Samsung big screen handset! Fancy trucks! Party Party Party!

And cast the bones of the dead on a heap of garbage.

That’s our modern Bajan culture.

Here are BFP’s prior reports on this phenomena…

Originally posted on Barbados Free Press:

UPDATED: October 11, 2012

Six skulls, bones, body parts found in open graveyard pit

With Monday’s discovery of an open pit containing burned skulls, bones and other body parts at the Christ Church Parish Church, our thoughts immediately turned to a previous article by our own Robert.

Sad. So sad. And what does it say about us?

Somebody should lose their job over this, but you know that’s never going to happen.

Here is the current story from the Nation, and then BFP’s original story…

Shocker in Christ Church graveyard

Mourners attending a burial in the Christ Church Parish Church’s cemetery on Monday evening were mortified when they stumbled upon a hole containing burnt skeletal remains.

An upset woman told the MIDWEEK NATION that they were disgusted by the sight in the graveyard.

“I counted at least six skulls and I could see teeth, hair and bones and what appeared to be…

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Religion

Murder assassination of Special Prosecutor Dana Seetahal terrible – but no surprise

Dana Seetahal murdered

Dana Seetahal murdered Sunday May 4, 2014

Courts and legal disputes are dangerous business in the Caribbean

submitted by Gary M. Further editing by Robert.

Folks who have lived all their lives in the UK or the USA do not understand what it means to be involved in a legal dispute or criminal trial in any Caribbean, Central or South American country. The reality is this: involvement with the courts can be dangerous business. Even minor disputes can produce threats, beatings or worse. That is generally not the way it is in the USA and UK, but in small island nations it is not unheard of for legal arguments to be put forward through cricket bats or Molotov cocktails in the dark of night.

And just because a person is in a legal dispute with the government is no guarantee of safety. Some say with good reason Sue de guvment. Trouble for you!

Where does this disrespect for law and the courts come from in the Caribbean?   
Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Police, Trinidad and Tobago

Just another Muslim honour killing: Pakistani family stones pregnant woman to death

pakistan-woman-stoned

Don’t forget: all cultures are deserving of equal respect because no culture is better than any other…

A pregnant woman was stoned to death by her own family in front of a Pakistani high court for marrying the man she loved.

Nearly 20 members of the woman’s family, including her father and brothers, attacked her and her husband with batons and bricks in broad daylight before a crowd of onlookers in front of the high court of Lahore, police investigator Rana Mujahid said.

The police stood by and watched it happen.

Hundreds of women are murdered every year in Muslim-majority Pakistan in so-called “honor killings” carried out by husbands or relatives as a punishment for alleged adultery or other illicit sexual behavior…

Read the rest of this horrifying story at The Telegraph

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Barbarians: Sudan Muslim government sentences pregnant woman to death for being Christian

Meriam Ibrahim Execution

And it’s all according to the Holy Koran

Muslim animals force Christian mother to give birth while wearing prison shackles.

In the early hours of May 27, 2014, Meriam Ibrahim gave birth while chained to a wall in a prison in Sudan. The Sudanese court recently confirmed she will be executed now that her child has been born. How civilized of the Muslim court to wait until the child is born.

The 27 year old’s crime was to marry a Christian. She was always raised a Christian, but her father (who left before she was born) was a Muslim. And that makes her a Muslim in the eyes of the court, and apostate. The Koran says apostates should be killed so that’s the end of that.

With Meriam in prison is her 20 month old son.

There is no difference at all between the Islam of Sudan, and Islam elsewhere. The only difference is the percentage of the population that is Muslim. When that percentage reaches a certain level, Sharia Law kicks into play, and Sharia Law is the law.

Let those millions of Muslims come forward who do not believe that Meriam Ibrahim and other ‘apostates’ should be executed for choosing another religion.

(Sound of crickets chirping)

Meriam Ibrahim: Apostasy Sudanese woman sentenced to hang ‘may not be freed’, her lawyers warn

The treatment of Ibrahim by the Sudanese authorities was internationally condemned in early May, when the then heavily pregnant woman was sentenced to death for refusing to renounce Christianity, and reportedly imprisoned with her 20-month-old son.

Pressure on Sudan to release Ibrahim increased last week, when the 27-year-old was forced to give birth to her daughter while restrained by shackles.  Continue reading

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Filed under Africa, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Religion

Letter to a Wayward Wife

adultery-barbados

The following letter was sent around by email in the past week. I don’t know where it came from.

The message though, is eternal…

Dear Wayward Wife,

Let’s take a moment to honestly look at your future as a divorcee.  It is both stark and bleak.  You are going to be chronically poor. Statistically, in spite of your hopes and dreams of new and better love, you are unlikely to remarry.  Even if you do, the man you marry will be of a lower quality than the man you’re leaving and will likely to be much older; ten or more years your senior is common.  Continue reading

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Filed under Culture & Race Issues

Amazing Barbados Photo: Blacks, Whites, Asians, Mixed Races Attend Party Together! Actually Enjoy Each Other!

BFP:

Six years ago our friend Light-Skinned-ed Girl declared May to be Mixed Experience History Month. We hope the idea catches on because those of us who are Heinz 57 and/or in mixed-race marriages need to reflect upon our roots once in a while.

If you have to ask “What’s the big deal?”, well, perhaps you need to think about it a little more. There are many more of us than ever before but when we talk with other mixies, the experience is generally the same: neither black nor white, and not really accepted by either race. Here’s a little piece written by Marcus back in October 2006. I miss him…

Originally posted on Barbados Free Press:

graeme-hall-party-2.jpg

Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary Site Of Astounding Happening!

Yes, folks – we couldn’t believe it ourselves (what with all this talk of that one incident last week between a light-skinned homeowner and a dark-skinned young man – link here) – it is true that several hundred people of all races, colours and religion all met last Saturday at the Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary, and actually enjoyed each other’s company!

The event was the official launch of the proposal to establish the Graeme Hall National Park – but it felt more like a party than a meeting to Shona and Marcus.

One Racial Incident At Party…

There was one very serious racial incident at the party though. For a few minutes around 5pm, the cash bar ran short of cold Banks beer and two men of different races argued over who would get the last cold one.

A Barbados Free…

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Political, religious, race-based agendas and fears are destroying our historical records

BFP:

Successive Barbados governments have been talking for at least twenty years about the need to protect our historical places, buildings and written history with laws and actions – and then offering that heritage as part of our tourism.

Yup, they have been talking about it for years. Talk. Talk. Talk. Talk – and not much else. Matter a fact, successive governments have chosen a fast buck or neglect every time over spending money to preserve and restore.

So this week was no different when Tourism Minister Richard Sealy said all the right words in front of first conference of Caribbean National Trusts and Preservation Societies. And words are about all that will be done until the next conference.

“Where’s the plan, Minister? Where’s the budget? Where’s the money put aside in your government’s budget for historical preservation?”

Words are all the DLP and BLP governments offer.

Here is an article we first published back in 2010, where our old friend Jim Lynch explains one of the reasons that we never seem to act to preserve our heritage, only talk. Maybe Mr. Sealy might read it…

Originally posted on Barbados Free Press:

Our old friend and retired “Twotter” pilot Jim Lynch loves to preserve Barbados history and is a treasure-trove of information and advice for those seeking to learn about their Caribbean ancestry. He has published some very special books that will occupy you for weeks if you get one in your hands. Two years ago we covered his work in our article Old Barbados Newspapers Are A Treasure Of History.

Today Jim stopped by BFP and left the following comment that we think is worth a few minutes of your time.

Thanks, Jim! (I think the photo is about 25 years old, but you haven’t aged a bit, have you?) :-)

I have been commended – and abused – in the past for saying what others think but refuse to put into words.

In Barbados, as in other Caribbean islands (and indeed in other parts of the world), records are destroyed…

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, History

Lawyer’s letters to BBC & Barbados High Commissioner: “Top Gear specialises in making a profit from deliberate but deniable racism.”

TopGear Festival Barbados

Clarkson subsequently withdrew the apology for his use of the N-word and said that the BBC forced him to issue it.

… from the letter apparently sent to the BBC and Barbados High Commissioner to the UK. Did Clarkson really withdraw his apology? Something like that here.

Strictly Private and Confidential letters sent to Barbados Free Press

Today BFP received two letters apparently sent from Equal Justice Ltd Solicitors to the BBC and our High Commissioner in London. The letters are supposed to be “Strictly Private and Confidential”, but nonetheless were sent to BFP as PDF files.

Interesting… the PDF files hidden data reveals that two other UK law firms are perhaps involved in their creation: Penman Sedgwick LLP and lawyer Beena Faridi, apparently with Bindmans LLP as a trainee.

“Dear High Commissioner, you should consider banning the programme from Barbados because it appears to incite racist bullying at work and in the social sphere.”

… from the letter apparently sent to the Barbados High Commissioner to the UK

What does it all mean? We’re not smart enough to say, so we’ll publish the text of the letters and also the original PDFs so folks can have a look for themselves at the letters exactly as they came to us anonymously through an anonymous proxy out of Russia.

Remember: These letters were sent anonymously to BFP – and BFP is an anonymous blog run by unnamed persons somewhere near Grape Hall. Take it all with some salt until it’s confirmed somehow, okay?

The whole thing is about Jeremy Clarkson’s “N-word” comments. Clarkson used the word “NIGGER” in case anybody missed what this is all about – but the below letters explain that Clarkson’s racist comments are intentional and scripted. Is that the truth? Judge for yourself…

PDFs of the Letters

Letter to Barbados High Commissioner  let toBarbados 060514

Letter to BBC  let to BBC 060514

Letter to Barbados High Commissioner

Equal Justice Solicitors

Striving for better justice
Equal Justice Ltd
Bloomsbury House
4, Bloomsbury Square
London WC1A 2RL
WC1A 2AJ

Tel: 020 7405 5292
Fax: 020 7405 5315
DX: 35708 Bloomsbury
http://www.equaljustice.co.uk

High Commissioner
Barbados High Commission
1 Great Russell Street
London WC1B 3ND
By post and email.
Email – london@foreign.gov.bb

URGENT

Strictly Private and Confidential
6 May 2014

Our ref: LD/Top Gear
Your ref:

Dear High Commissioner

Clarkson-gate

Race complaint against the UK’s British Broadcasting Corporation (“BBC”)

We act for various clients (including Richard Rogers and Fred Jacobs, US citizens) who have brought a race complaint against Jeremy Clarkson (a tv presenter) and the UK’s British Broadcasting Corporation (“BBC”) for scripting and authorising the use of the N-word in filming for the “Top Gear” show. As it transpired, and probably due to our previous complaints about the use of racist anti-Mexican material on the previous show, the BBC and Clarkson got cold feet and the racist material was not broadcast, but the racist intent to profit from the use of deliberate but deniable racism was there.

Mexican people (both adults and children) living in the UK were subjected to racist bullying after the earlier anti-Mexican broadcast.

The BBC defended the anti-Mexican racist material on the basis that it was “British humour”. Mexicans were described as being fat, flatulent, lazy and feckless. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Race

What it feels like to be Mixed Race?

BFP:

Race permeates everything in Bim. It’s always there even when not visible – always hiding just below the horizon. The politicians bring it out appropriately or not, and often with the intent of causing division or distraction.

But we have to admit, it’s not like the old days even if some folks wish it were so. It was much easier to be a politician in Barbados when all you had to do to deflect valid criticism was to say “whites!” or “curry boys!”.

Jody is a mixie Brit with Bajan heritage. Here’s what she says…

Originally posted on Thoughtful Scribbles:

Someone recently asked me what it felt like to be mixed race and this made me realise, I’ve never really written before about my own ethnicity and culture. Firstly we have the term mixed race – before anyone gets all political with this, mixed race is a term I feel completely comfortable with. Now however, we are supposed to say dual heritage instead, just as we are no longer supposed to say half caste which I do find offensive, along with half-breed. I have been called all of these names (and worse).

download (4)I have a British white parent (a mixture of English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh), and a black Caribbean parent whose own parents are from Barbados. Both my parents are British. My Caribbean grandparents emigrated from the West Indies in the early 1950s as the UK is the mother country of Barbados and the British government asked them to…

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Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson: “Catch a Nigger by the toe, when he squeals…”

UPDATED May 7, 2014: Poll closed due to organised campaign to support Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson

Did Top Gear or Jeremy Clarkson hire some backroom operation to change the results of BFP’s poll? That’s a definite possibility.

BFP’s poll asked if our readers could hearing Clarkson saying the word ‘nigger’ in the YouTube video. For the first few days the results were running about 90% yes… but then we saw dozens and dozens of ‘no’ responses coming from two IP numbers in the UK, where the people involved were obviously conducting an organised effort to change the results of the poll in Clarkson’s favour.

Naughty, naughty!

So we’ve frozen the poll where it ended up, but our readers should know that the displayed result doesn’t reflect the actual views of BFP’s readers that is running about 90% ‘yes’ and 8% ‘no’ and 2% ‘can’t tell, too drunk to care’.

Cliverton

“Einee meenie miney moe…”

“There’s a slope on it…” (Clarkson as an asian man walks on a bridge. YouTube video below.)

And we haven’t even told you about Clarkson’s Nazi salute or his black dog named after a black footballer.

Is Jeremy Clarkson unthinking, always over the line… or truly a racist?

I haven’t decided for myself as yet, but here are a few tidbits for your consideration – including an apology excuse from Clarkson.

Is the BFP crew going to the TopGear festival at Bushy Park? You bet! We wouldn’t miss it for anything… no matter what Mr. Clarkson thinks or says about the colours of our skins.

Jeremy Clarkson’s apology excuse

Hey… no matter what he says about mumbling, I hear the word ‘Nigger’ clear ’nuff in the video at the top of this post. How about you?

Further Reading and Viewing…

UK Mirror: Jeremy Clarkson’s previous ‘race rows': From black dogs and Nazi salutes to Lenny Henry

UK Mirror: Video: Watch Jeremy Clarkson use n-word in unseen Top Gear footage

The Guardian: Jeremy Clarkson ‘begs forgiveness’ over N-word footage

Jeremy Clarkson: Twitter feed with apology excuse.

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Filed under Barbados, Celebrities, Culture & Race Issues, Race

Anti-gay laws undermine CARICOM’s slavery reparations demands

Execution Blacks Gays Lesbians Slavery

Homosexuals executed in Iran, Blacks lynched in USA

Human Rights are Human Rights: whether denied upon skin colour or sexual orientation

by Sean Macleish
Caribbean Alliance for Equality

Prime Minister, Ralph Gonsalves, the current chair of CARICOM (Caribbean Community Secretariat) along with other Caribbean leaders who are continuing to cultivate and place a high discount rate on the lives of their lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) citizens are helping to mortgage the region’s future with atrophy, by retarding the growth of their nations in exchange for power by majority rule. Social inclusion, equality and open diversity foster environments where everyone can bring their best to the table and feel valued without incurring the costs associated with repression.

In 2014, 12 of the 15 CARICOM member states still criminalize homosexuality.

Suriname is one of the remaining member states that has legalized homosexuality since 1869. Social economics has many costs and the archaic philosophy of legalized oppression is counterproductive to investing in a nation’s greatest asset; it’s people. In February, referring to the costs of homophobia, President of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim stated, “Institutionalized discrimination is bad for people and societies. Widespread discrimination is also bad for economies. There is clear evidence that when societies enact laws that prevent productive people from fully participating in the workforce, economies suffer.”  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Human Rights, Slavery

When only a white could Captain the West Indies Cricket Team

“I am of the firm belief that whatever is for you in this world, it will come to you. Nobody can stop it; they might be able to delay it somewhat, but they do not have the power to prevent it coming to you.”

Earle Clarke

Sir Frank Worrell

Sir Frank Worrell

When John Goddard resigned after skippering the West Indies team during the 1950 tour to England (video), some hoped that a black would finally be selected to lead – based on talent and leadership abilities, not skin colour. But it was not to be.

Don’t forget: this was an era when only white reporters were allowed to cover events in the Courts of Barbados, and when a person of colour could not eat at the yacht club let alone become a member.

It was another ten years before Frank Worrell (above) became Captain during the 1960-61 “Down Under” tour.

Earle Clarke remembers that it wasn’t all about cricket…

Leadership

by Earle Clarke

Some years ago, I wrote an article containing information which I will use today. In that article, I was trying to show the discrimination in the West Indies Cricket Team against Black captains from the inception of West Indies Cricket on the world stage, but, in today’s column, I will point out the qualities that make good leaders, using the same West Indies Cricket Team as an example. In the 1950’s when I was able to understand the game of cricket, it dawned on me that, although there was a goodly number of black players on the team, it had to be captained by a white man, especially cricket teams which hailed from the sister island of Barbados.

I could well remember listening to a cricket series, England vs West Indies in England in 1950 when I attended the Basseterre Boys’ School at Victoria Road, where all of us from the New Town area would end up receiving lashes from the Head Master for late coming, because we stopped by Pappy, a Taxi Service place right in front of Lime’s office on Cayon Street to listen to the game.

In those days, poor people like us could only listen to radios in the rum shops or by Mr. Pappy on our way to and from school. I remember that the West Indies was skippered by a white Barbadian named, John Goddard. John Goddard resigned after the tour in 1950 to England and Dennis Atkinson another white Barbadian was selected as captain. Continue reading

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St. Vincent Prime Minister says he does Obeah sorcery for the Lord

Racist_Ralph_Gonsalves

“I only work Obeah for the Lord”

SVG Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves

by Peter Binose

These words were recorded as spoken by Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves in parliament, “I only work Obeah for the Lord”. What an insult to the Vincentian Christian society. How on earth can a prime minister in a Christian country say such a thing, and never apologise?

According to Wikipedia, Obeah (sometimes spelled Obi, Obea or Obia) is a term used in the West Indies to refer to folk magic, sorcery, and religious practices derived from West African, and specifically Igbo origin. Obeah is similar to other African derived religions including Palo, Voodoo, Santeria, rootwork, and most of all hoodoo.

Obeah is associated with both benign and malignant magic, charms, luck, and with mysticism in general. In some Caribbean nations, Obeah refers to folk religions of the African diaspora. In some cases, aspects of these folk religions have survived through syncretism with Christian symbolism and practice introduced by European colonials and slave owners. Casual observation may conclude that Christian symbolism is incorporated into Obeah worship, but in fact may represent clandestine worship and religious protest.

During slavery, Obeah was directed against the European slave masters. However, with the rise of Christianity, Obeah is considered taboo, and the term has pejorative associations.

Which ‘Lord’ is PM Gonsalves referring to?

Obeah is practiced in Suriname, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Dominica, Guyana, Barbados, Grenada, Belize, The Bahamas and now according to Dr Ralph E. Gonsalves in St Vincent, and other Caribbean countries. Gonsalves said in parliament, “I only do Obeah for the Lord.” It’s true he said that, and it’s recorded in parliamentary records.

Such a statement must be an insult to Christians. Gonsalves told us he only does Obeah for the Lord. My argument is that you cannot do Obeah for God or Lord Jesus. So who is Gonsalves referring to, could it be ‘The Lord of Darkness, Satan‘?  Continue reading

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Internet pornography kills love, warps young minds and sustains slavery.

Donville Inniss associated website: Pregnant women porn at Orgasm.com

Government Minister Donville Inniss associated website: Pregnant women porn at Orgasm.com …CLICK PHOTO FOR DETAILS AND STORY…

by Grenville Phillips II

by Grenville Phillips II

Pornography is now easily available to all school children who have access to a tablet or a smart phone.  It is facilitated by persons who allow unrestricted access to the Internet in their homes or at the many Wi-Fi hotspots around Barbados.  So let me share a solution; but first, let me describe the problem.

Pornography has two main damaging effects.  The impact for viewers is that that they can primarily view sexual intercourse as a means to satisfy themselves rather than satisfying their partners.  For male viewers, this can lead to a less satisfying sexual experience for her and a boring routine for him.  He will likely develop an uncaring attitude towards her if she does not express a similar delight in his sexual performance as those whom he watches.  His sexual experience should be all about satisfying her, and her sexual experience should be all about satisfying him.

The most damaging impact is on the victims whom the watchers are viewing.  Many women, especially from Asian and eastern European countries, are forced into the sex slave trade, with harsh consequences if they do not show delight when raped (See ‘Half the Sky’ and other research into sex slavery).  As the watchers view these victims, they are supporting and sustaining this slavery.  If people choose not to pay to view pornography on the Internet, then they still support and sustain the sex slave trade by adding to the web sites’ page views, which increases their potential advertising revenues.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Corruption, Crime & Law, Culture & Race Issues, Ethics, Government, Human Rights, Politics & Corruption, Slavery