Daily Archives: April 17, 2012

Canadian tax decision should spur Barbados to ease up residency procedures

Garron Barbados Trust case has frightening implications for Bajan offshore industry

by One Who Knows

An April 12, 2012 decision by Canada’s Supreme Court is putting the pressure on Barbados. The decision changes everything for Canadian trusts residing in Barbados. Many Canadian-controlled trusts will now be taxable in Canada at Canadian rates… and if that is the case then what is the use of having the trusts in Barbados or having the annual meeting on the beach at the Bridgetown Hilton?

Barbados and other Caribbean offshore banking centres rely heavily upon favourable tax laws from Canada, Britain and the USA. As our Prime Minister is so fond of saying: Barbados is not a tax ‘haven’, we are a legitimate financial and corporate centre. There’s a difference you know – but it is a difference that the Canadian government is increasingly unsympathetic to.

The Canadian government is aggressively pursuing a policy of hunting down potential tax revenues that have been ‘missing’ offshore and Barbados is squarely in the tax-haven gunsights.

It’s all about residency… so is Barbados willing to expedite residency for worthy offshore investors?

Whether true or not, Barbados has a reputation for being a difficult country to deal with in terms of immigration, residency and citizenship. Now that Canada has set new rules that threaten the health of our offshore financial and corporate industry, can Barbados adapt quickly enough to keep the trust clients who will soon be moving out?

Offshore trusts can still fall within Canada’s tax net

On April 12, a new landmark was established in the world of tax. It’ll provide guidance to taxpayers for years to come. I’m talking about a Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) decision in a case known in tax circles as the Garron case.

One of the most fundamental questions that every government must ask is this: Who should be liable to pay tax? Most governments have adopted the same answer to the question: If you reside in a country, you should pay tax there. (The U.S. is a rare exception where individuals are taxed if they are citizens, regardless of where they live. Oh, and the U.S. also taxes those who reside there.)

The common principle is that a person who derives economic and social benefit from living in a place should owe an economic allegiance to that place. And so, Canada – like most countries – taxes based on residency.

The problem? Determining whether you’re resident in Canada for tax purposes can be tough because it’s generally a question of fact and subject to the interpretation of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) or the courts (with some rare exceptions where certain people are deemed to be resident here).

The case

Determining residency is even tougher when we’re talking about an entity that isn’t a person with a family and a home to live in. What if you’re a corporation? Or a trust? The Garron case, formally referred to as Fundy Settlement v. Canada, 2012 SCC 14, is the story of two family trusts that purported to be resident in Barbados, not Canada, and therefore claimed to escape the Canadian tax net.

The trustee of the trusts is St. Michael Trust Corp., resident in Barbados. The beneficiaries of the trusts are residents of Canada. The trusts sold shares in two Ontario corporations and realized substantial capital gains in the process. The purchaser was required to withhold and remit taxes to the Canadian government on account of these capital gains – to the tune of $152-million. Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Canada, Offshore Investments