Canadian turned Bajan has the last word on the PWC Barbados Globe and Mail story

Friends, some of you agreed with our coverage of the Dark Days in Barbados story in Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper, and others thought we over-did it. A few readers hit the roof in anger – either at us or the newspaper depending on their feelings. Others thought we should leave Elaine Sibson alone, which is an interesting position considering Ms. Sibson was the one who volunteered to tell her personal story to the world via the Globe and Mail.

CTV Television and other Canadian outlets also carried Gordon Pitts’ “Dark days in Barbados”

For some reason this story generated very high attention with BFP’s readership and internationally. In the last 24 hours over five thousand people read each of our articles on the Globe and Mail story. There were many different opinions and perspectives. (As a side note, after reading the PWC stories, thousands of people stayed and read dozens of other articles here at Barbados Free Press.)

One BFP reader raised a point that we’d never considered and is, upon reflection, something that the Globe and Mail left out. It is a factor that might or might not have had a major influence on Ms. Sibson’s decision to move to Barbados and her subsequent trouble adjusting. We’ll let a BFP reader (and divorced father) say it for himself…

She had a divorce, was awarded custody of her 12 year old daughter and what did she do? She requested a job thousands of miles away from the girl’s father. That sounds not nice to me and any other divorced father who knows the pain.

Move-Away Moms Harm Children

Moms who take their children and move away from their children’s fathers create life-long hardship for their children. Granted there are rare exceptions when a move may be warranted. But they far rarer than NOWers (National Organization of Women -ed) admit.

Generally, move-away-moms move primarily for their own best interest and not their children’s…”

… you can read his entire comment here: Nice Lady? Fathers’ Rights Now!

Food for thought, for sure.

But okay, it’s time to move on to other stories and we’ll do so now. Although the comments will remain open, this is the last BFP will say about the story. We’ll let the last word in our article be spoken by someone who disagrees with BFP’s coverage.

Dear Barbados Free Press,

Your less then stellar story on “Globe and Mail changes misleading website headline – print edition still proclaims “Dark Days in Barbados” has had me irritated all day.

I am a Canadian, presently living in Barbados, and am married to a Bajan, but, it hasn’t always been easy!

You want coverage and only good shining words about Barbados in all papers? Not gine ta happen ya.

I can sympathize with the woman as I to had to deal with the culture shock, it is up to the individual how they deal with it.

I’ve had to deal with the humiliation of being treated less then human by the Barbados immigration dept, in Bridgetown, this goes on daily there.

When coming to Barbados, working in a supervisory capacity, Bajan’s show a whole different side.

She wrote an article and her experience wasn’t all it could have been, but the article headline was hardly misleading! The fact that the paper changed the article headline is a fact of Canadians being nice to a fault.

(Sent via email to BFP. Name provided to BFP but not published by our editor)

About these ads

3 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Business & Banking, Culture & Race Issues

3 responses to “Canadian turned Bajan has the last word on the PWC Barbados Globe and Mail story

  1. Donald Duck Esq

    Is there more to this story than what we are being told? I suspect so.

  2. Douglas Newsam

    @Donald – I suspect that you may be correct….. there is always (n + 1) sides to a story where “n” is the number of people involved!

  3. Rumboy.

    I think that this story has had more than enough coverage, surely there are more important things happening out there for our attention like Graeme Hall for example.

Tell the world what you think about this!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s