Khalil Campbell Murder – Victim’s Father Lennox Campbell Speaks Out

There but for the grace of God go I, or my brother, or my son, or my family.

That’s all I could think after reading what Lennox Campbell had to say about the murder of his son. God bless all who cry for what happened in Jamaica.

Read I Wouldn’t Wish This On My Worst Enemy in the Jamaican Observer.

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63 Comments

Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Religion

63 responses to “Khalil Campbell Murder – Victim’s Father Lennox Campbell Speaks Out

  1. Phoenix

    That’s a sad story. It sounds like a movie. I pray God’s strength and blessings on both families.

  2. Rumplestilskin

    A sad story of one family’s fight. And from the father’s statement, the ‘mental illness’ coincided with the drug use.

    And some claim marijuana is ‘harmless’.

    Yes, there are some persons more susceptible to such substances and other drugs than other persons, but the individuals themselves can rarely distinguish or admit the effect, and these substances have devastating effects on individuals, families and society.

  3. my sympathy goes out to both families.such an embarrassment and tragedy to such wonderful people!to the young,please stay away from drugs.

  4. My sympathy to both families as well.

    ……..what a statement from an outstanding member of the Jamaican society.

    “IN August, Lennox Campbell warned his youngest son, Khalil, who struggled for years with mental illness, that if he returned to Jamaica from Miami he would be dead in six months.

    Why should i ignore this commentry in light of Barbadian leaders opening our borders, and by so doing exposing our language and our culture to the forces and circumstances that led a supreme court judge of Jamaica to this frightfully prophetic conclusion? Somebody tell me again how is CSME going to help Barbados?

  5. Being realistic

    Sad sad sad

    leave the drugs alone…

  6. John

    … only in the mind of O$A, only in the mind of O$A.

    Sometimes I think CSME is simply a means to give a politician the philosophical high ground to explain the sell out of Bajan assets, particularly to Trinidad interests.

    How do they put it ….. opening the doors to capital inflows and diversifying share ownership within the region. They even had a special phrase for the BNB, I am sure all of them had to learn it by heart. It all sounds very grand and like they are actually doing something.

    CRAP …. oops, sorry Auntie Moses

    Barbados has slid to such a point that its own people can’t make it economically viable. They no longer have the will or the gumption. Mr. B is the perfect example to make a Bajan with skill who wants to make a go of it to simply go, get out, use his/her skills elsewhere.

    What is the point of building up anything if this can happen to you and your family?

    … and then the question follows.

    If the CCJ was inaugurated to make the CSME work, what is the point of the CCJ?

    … apart from the borrowing of $100 million by the region.

  7. Lynette

    Adrian,

    What a misinterpretation! The man told his son this within a context; that context being his illness and all that came along with it.

    I can’t help but think that you have deliberately lifted this statement out of context to suit you narrow, exclusivist agenda.

    In so doing, you have missed the other interpretation that could be put on this situation despite your self-serving statements about Barbadian leaders exposing your “language and culture to the forces and circumstances … blah blah blah”

    The murder was committed by someone who was born and bred in this wonderful country of yours. So a little less of the bigotry and exclusivism please.

  8. ha ha ha is this Lynette Eastmond? Now why would you pick this time to be so nasty towards me? Are you very certain that you can beat Estwick? I have a time line of pictures of you, braids and all that i can in addition to your several comments here and elsewhere allow me to paint a picture of you as a lover of the said culture and vegetable matter that Mr. Lennox Campbell condemn the Jamaican society for. You want to me display my opinions of you using your pics and words? Wait wait i have never once waited for approval from a politician. Let the battle begin. :D

  9. Khalil’s parents decided not to send him back to Guyana, but to send him instead to see a psychiatrist, who diagnosed him as having MARIJUANA-INDUCED PSYCHOSIS. Khalil became more withdrawn and antisocial, and eventually he was admitted to the Cornwall Regional Hospital, where his psychiatrist was stationed, the first of a series of trips in and out of care that would characterise the next decade of his life.
    CONVINCED THAT GANJA WAS A LARGE PART OF THE PROBLEM FACING THEIR SON, the Campbells decided that KHALIL WOULD PROBABLY BE BETTER OFF AWAY FROM JAMAICA, WITH ITS LIBERAL CULTURAL ATTITUDE TO MARIJUANA AND THE EASY AVAILABILITY OF THE HERB.They sent him to Florida, where he moved in with his older brother, enrolled at the Broward Community College, and began seeing a new psychiatrist. It was only a matter of time, however, before his problems returned.

    “I told him, I told him that. In my mind, Jamaica had grown so violent that I didn’t think that he could manage, not in the state he was. I told him, given how our society is, ‘Khalil, if you were to come here you’re going to die within six months’,” his father added.

  10. BFP

    Hi Adrian

    Lynette is not our Lynette. She is posting from Guyana.

  11. I agree that the statement was made in the context of his illness, but what was his illness? MARIJUANA-INDUCED PSYCHOSIS, what are some of the manifestations of this PSYCHOSIS? violent anti-social behaviour. What are the two things that Lennox Campbell use to define JAMAICA? Liberal attitude to and ready availabilty of MARIJUANA, AND AND IT’S VIOLENCE.
    Is it wrong for me to see this as an indicment of Jamaica? and is it wrong for me to be concern about integrating Barbadian society with this society? you must do better than call me names. Explain to me why it is a result of my so called narrow exclusive agenda and not a result of the truth of Mr. Campbell’s indicment. :D

  12. BFP
    January 8th, 2007 at 3:48 pm
    Hi Adrian

    Lynette is not our Lynette. She is posting from Guyana.
    —————————————————————–
    wuh you mean from Guyana? You mean this person is in Guyana? Guyana has computers and internet access?? :D tuh tell yuh de truth i was surprise that young Campbell could have gotten Marjuana in Guyana, but then i remembered that ever drug pusher in Brazil, Columbia, and Venezuela does walk thru Guyana as if it is an open lot get their product up the Caribbean island chain.

    ..Lynette after you tire of cussing me can you give me your opinions on the statements made on this website? http://www.guyanausa.org I got many questions about the Land of six people (it really is about 6 now after all the migration :D) hopefully your anger would subside sufficiently to answer. :D

  13. rightvwrong

    schizophrenia is a horrible disease very prevalent in young males reaching maturity—not taking medication is also very typical—whether it was marijuana induced or exacerbated doesn’t really take away from the hopelessness and despair that many families find themselves in—unable to break through to their child—a real and living hell!!!

  14. Lynette

    First of all Lynette is not posting from Guyana. Neither is it the Lynette that Adrian is subtly or not so subtly threatening to uncover because he has “a time line of pictures … braids and all that … (he) can in addition to your several comments here and elsewhere allow me to paint a picture of you as a lover of the said culture and vegetable matter that Mr. Lennox Campbell condemn the Jamaican society for.”

    So sad, so sad.

  15. rightvwrong says:
    January 8th, 2007 at 4:09 pm
    schizophrenia is a horrible disease very prevalent in young males reaching maturity—not taking medication is also very typical—whether it was marijuana induced or exacerbated doesn’t really take away from the hopelessness and despair that many families find themselves in—unable to break through to their child—a real and living hell!!!
    —————————————————————
    Fair enough but i don’t think it is a good comparison between DRUG induce PSYCHOSIS or attributed to genetics. The over reaching problem was young Campbells inability to take his prescribe drugs and his preference for the ones that cause the illness in the first place. Marijuana started and ended his problem. You cannot get away from that.

  16. Lynette
    January 8th, 2007 at 4:15 pm
    First of all Lynette is not posting from Guyana. Neither is it the Lynette that Adrian is subtly or not so subtly threatening to uncover because he has “a time line of pictures … braids and all that … (he) can in addition to your several comments here and elsewhere allow me to paint a picture of you as a lover of the said culture and vegetable matter that Mr. Lennox Campbell condemn the Jamaican society for.”

    So sad, so sad.
    —————————————————————-
    Look all i ask is if you are going to debate me print a few MORE words that fully represents your thoughts. I want to understand where you are coming but my limited education and thought capacity isn’t permitting me to derive much info from the above, help muh out nuh.
    …..and how could my intended actions regarding Lynette Eastmond be seen as uncovering? The pics and the comments made by her are all available in the public domain.

  17. Lynette

    Fair enough Adrian. My first response to you, was one in which I see that you are proud of your country, with good reason; and that you are worried that integration may cause the development of your country to decline – and Barbados has done a very good job in terms of its social development.

    However, I am in favour of regional integration, because having worked in a number of countries, including countries in the Caribbean, I feel that there is a bigger picture beyond our desires to keep our gains intact.

    This bigger picture includes taking advantage of the untapped potential of many of our Caribbean sister islands that are as yet undeveloped for different reasons, and giving our peoples greater and wider opportunities and exposure, that can release us from our sometimes myopic visions (and I am speaking generally here).

    I also know that the very vulnerabilities which our islands and countries possess, mean that while things are going fine today for some of us, there is no guarantee that what holds us together today, will work for us tomorrow. In other words, one very strong hurricane can undo much of what Barbados has going for it today, and leave many wishing that there had been more collaboration with others in the past.

    Your fears are not totally unfounded, but nothing good is gained without some risk, and like everything else, we need proper management of processes for success.

    There is much that is good and bad in our islands. There is a lot that we can learn from each other, and there are somethings that I would not want transferred from any of these islands – Jamaica, Barbados and Guyana included. Building societies and cultures take time and it cannot happen by locking ourselves away in ivory towers.

    Sorry for calling you names.

  18. Lynette

    And of course, some postings come after others, so I am only now seeing the one where you say when I am tired of cussing you.

    Cussing??? C’mon!!

  19. Ralazada

    I can’t believe people are discussing this terrible occurrence as a platform as to why the CSME should not be moving forward.
    People come out of the dark ages.
    Two families are mourning now, we are all caribbean brothers and sisters, and until we start helping each other, nothing with help anyone.
    There will come a day when even mighty Barbadians will need help from someone in the Caribbean, and its important to remember that Caribbean Unity is not just about free movement of nationals, but a mindset as well.
    Xenophobia is a terrible thing and its worse when its your own Caribbean Cousins that you’re turning your back on.

  20. rightvwrong

    Adrian

    I have known of a number of young men and families who have been faced with this illness— sooner or later, most of those facing this illness were taking some sort of recreational drugs—but not all.

    I have a healthy skepticism of the knowledge and omnipotence of most doctors and therefore am unprepared to accept without reservation that this was a drug induced illness.

    Maybe someone out in BFP land can direct us to some excellent medical sites which cover this specific issue.

    It would be interesting to see what researchers and medical doctors have theorised on the issue of triggering of shizophrenia given their specialization and day to day experience.

  21. rightvwrong

    Adrian

    a couple of interesting sites which show the difficulty and complexity of this illness

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1360812&dopt=Citation

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2185538&dopt=Citation

    seems as if smoking ( assume cigarettes ) and the use of cocaine and amphetamines have a correlation —what the correlation is I am not certain

    probably the same as if you are a serious smoker the chances of you getting lung cancer over the long term is multipled many times

  22. Greg_or

    I read the article and I am not convinced that the family did what they were suppose to do, by having a boy then a man, who clearly was a danger, not only to himself but to others stay on the streets. The boy needed constant attention from a medical facility; he needed to be admitted to a mental institution for constant treatment. A judge and a father should know better, but I guess the stigma was too much to bear. And seemingly excusing the action of his son’s slaughterer (blaming his son’s illness), borders on sounding callous and sounding as though he is glad a burden was lifted off the shoulders of his family. Mental issues seem to run in the family; and ‘talk about’ speaking death into the life of your own child. Education isn’t common sense.

  23. Kathy

    It sounds like the boy was admitted to hospitals on several occasions, then released. The psychiatrists apparently felt he was OK to be out on the streets, and, he apparently did not hurt anyone. The family seems to have gone over and above to get him treated, and to no avail. The way the family openly discussed their child’s problem does not sound like they feared a stigma – it sounds genuine and non-judgemental. We should not judge a family that are even willing to forgive their son’s killer.

  24. Sarah

    Greg, your comments are appalling. Hindsight is 20/20 vision and it is sad that you sit and “judge” from the sidelines. Until you have walked in this parents shoes don’t cast your stones. And what does being a judge have to do with anything? Please. What a display of ignorance. You need to check yourself. Don’t become a counsellor to the grieving anytime soon. You need help. Sarah

  25. Being Equally Realistic

    Sad sad sad
    leave the drugs alone… he said. Maybe.

    But think about this…
    which young man, dressing to go out at night, clubbing,
    puts on his shirt, pants, shoes, etc.,
    and just a few secs before exiting, suddenly remembers…
    Oh Shimons: I almost forgot my knife! Lookah dah,nuh..!

    I ask you: me and you tussling in a car park.
    WHERE does a KNIFE suddenly spring from??
    WHO had a knife(pre-meditation of possession) handy, “just in case” ?

    Do you dress,normally, with YOUR rachet?
    Doesn’t everybody?

    You have to wonder!

  26. Jake

    Ralazada,

    I agree with you, I don’t see the link between the death of the young man in Jamaica, CSME and our barbadian leaders. I think Mr. Adrian knows what he is about.

  27. Sesame

    I think what happened was devastating and my heart goes out to both families. I commend the Campbells for putting what happened to their son in perspective and I pray that their God will comfort them and turn their mourning to joy.
    As far as i heard Rodney Beckles was born in Jamaica an his mother is also Jamaican so he is also a son of the soil

  28. What i wanted to dicuss was the way i view the comments of Mr. Campbell senior that he made of the Jamaican society, Views that are similar to what i hold and that are base on the reality of Jamaican life, the violence, the drugs, the level of proverty, the cultural differences to Barbados, the realization that Jamaica given it’s size can absorb these negatives, while mitigating the debilitating effects to it’s overall tourism economy, something that is not acheivable in Little Bim. It is the level of proverty and prevailing view in Jamaica and Guyana that Barbados offers an opportunity for them to take advantage, and while i do not have a problem with migration in general, and understand the benefits that can be derived from integrating our economies etc. I will not dwell only on the positives but must ponder the shortcommings, and the negatives given all that we know, and that in so doing it is not driven by fear, but by the understanding that change is never smooth and is best achieved when managed. The management of this change has not to my mind asked the difficult questions concerning current cultural trends in the societies that are being integrated and how best to deal with the negatives while exploiting the positives. The approach to my mind has been as if there are no social negatives and therefore no need to spend time looking at potential fall out, and for ways to address them. These are legitimate concerns and they have been met with some of the harshest comments from our leaders, members of the landed gentry and others who stand to benefit from this significant change, and when i compare this reaction to these concerns from our leaders to the reasoned, dignified, professional, and informative response to the concerns of Barbadian/caribbean Tour operators and visitors during CWC to the visa requirements, the need for them etc. I wonder why. They both have a social aspect to it. I will ask again what is achieved from dismissing the genuine concerns of Barbadians as xenophobic, then to demand that the same xenophobic Barbadians do their part in all manner of things? Will this be successfull without the citizens?

    What makes Jamaicans and Indo Guyanese our “cousins” ?

  29. Jennifer

    This is in response to Greg_or’s statement…….
    My advice to you is for you to do what it takes to develop your critical thinking skills so that you can make more logically sound comments. The comments made by my brother-in-law certainly do not degrade his character as one of the most loving and capable parents that any child could ask for!!! I’ve known Khalil since he was a baby and he grew up to be a fine young man. Unfortunately, life for him to a downward turn and ended tragically. Does that give you or anyone else the right to be so callous and shallow with your comments/remarks???
    There is a saying..”if yuh live in a glass house, dont throw stone”…..Your turn may be right around the corner without your knowing. May God have mercy on us all as go through life.
    *************************************************

    “I read the article and I am not convinced that the family did what they were suppose to do, by having a boy then a man, who clearly was a danger, not only to himself but to others stay on the streets. The boy needed constant attention from a medical facility; he needed to be admitted to a mental institution for constant treatment. A judge and a father should know better, but I guess the stigma was too much to bear. And seemingly excusing the action of his son’s slaughterer (blaming his son’s illness), borders on sounding callous and sounding as though he is glad a burden was lifted off the shoulders of his family. Mental issues seem to run in the family; and ‘talk about’ speaking death into the life of your own child. Education isn’t common sense.”

  30. Jennifer

    On behalf of our family- the Campbell family, thank you all for your warm thoughts. There are no guarantees in this world, save that of life and death. My prayer is that we will learn from life’s “every day” lessons and understand our purpose here.
    God bless you all!

  31. Jane

    Jennifer, may God bless your family and may you be comforted by the prayers and love of many people who care.

  32. Jamaican

    How predictable that someone in Barbados (Adrian) would view this human tragedy as an opportunity to wrap the blue and yellow around him and from his smug perch, trumpet the ills of Jamaica, the merits of Barbados and the evils of integration. Insularity is a trait that runs deep in Barbadian society; Lord knows why. Barbados is a wonderul country…I lived there, have many friends there, and it is probably the country I visit most other than the US…actually, they are probably in a dead heat! I travel there later today, in fact. However, the smugness of people like Adrian is painful to observe as it does Barbados no favours. Thank goodness that I have had the opportunity to meet and become very good friends with a number of Barbadians, many of whom have their own long-standing love affair with – of all places – Jamaica, or I would simply conclude that narrow-mindedness is a national disease.

  33. Guyanese in Antigua

    Like Jamaican, I can and will never be able to understand the Barbadian psyche. Having lived in Barbados myself, and having placed it as a favourite on my list of places to visit, I have great difficulty with the gross insularity that exists in a land where the level of education is superior to many of its neighbours. Barbados is indeed a wonderful country…I too have many friends there. Thank God they do not display the myopia of Adrian. Should that be credited to the fact that they are better travelled and have horizons that extend way beyond that of Adrian’s?

    And Adrian, speaking about the level of poverty in Guyana….you are obviously too young to know of the days when Bajans went to Guyana by boat, posing as black bellied sheep. How do you think so many Guyanese qualify for Bajan citizenship? Don’t be too smug muh boy. Guyana was once prosperous and successful. All that is needed is a couple terms of bad leadership and Barbados could become another Guyana or Jamaica. Of course, you folks would blame it on migrants.

    And finally Adrian. It is obvious that you are fairly well educated as evidenced by your writings. However, your teachers messed up badly with the tenses. No offense meant. It’s just that my tolerance level is zero when it comes to bad English.

  34. Guyanese in Antigua

    Just so you know. I am not one of the Guyanese on the run from the recent disgraceful situation in my country. I left Guyana aeons ago by virtue of marriage to a non-Guyanese. Would I have left anyway? Honestly….yes. But I’m still very proud of my country and never miss an opportunity to visit. I won’t trade it for anything else in the world.

  35. Guyanese in Antigua

    I was so taken up with Adrian that I almost missed the true reason for this blog.

    My heart goes out to the Campbell and Beckles families as they struggle to cope with this awful tragedy. What may well be a painful relief for the Campbells is the nightmare of the Beckles’. Just so you know, (and this is the voice of experience), time and prayer are two of the greatest great healers. This too shall pass.

  36. Spooky

    GIA you were going good until you said this>>>

    And Adrian, speaking about the level of poverty in Guyana….you are obviously too young to know of the days when Bajans went to Guyana by boat, posing as black bellied sheep. How do you think so many Guyanese qualify for Bajan citizenship?

  37. Spooky

    BFP what is happening? Half of my reply to Guyanese In Antigua did not appear. You certain the hackers not getting through?

  38. Jupiter

    Jamaican & Guyanese in Antigua

    1)Adrian will I’m sure defend himself,but let me first say acc to what he told us his blogger friends he lives in north america.

    2)I totally agree with Adrian re the influx of guyanese and other non nationals in this country – they are responsible for an increasing number of crimes in this country as told to us by our commissioner of police and agreed by a guyanese lawyer and a former diplomat as well – Mr Frank Da silva (the latter spoke on the social fall out).

    3)The vast majority of bajans feel the same way as Adrian as we are the ones seeing our high standard of living being driven down.

    4)If what I’m hearing from persons on the ground is fulfilled,there will be social unrest and upheaval in barbados if this large scale,unplanned migration is not checked and reversed.

    5)Finally barbadians have always been subjected to the harshest criticisms by other caricom nationals about how insular they are,yet these nonationals all flood into B’dos and live very comfortably there,never leaving.
    Why is this? – because b’dos has a history of welcoming foreigners – now it seems to their detriment.St Lucians,Dominicans,Vincentians,Guyanese and Jamaican all came in the 60’s 70’s and 80’s to trade as hawkers,to work as professionals,to cut cane etc – they were in the main decent people,however what we are seeing are the riff raff,the prostitutes,thieves,persons with no skill,no address of where to stay just turning up and over staying their ‘visit’.

    We know a lot of caribbean nationals will feel good if B’dos started experiencing the problems of Guyan,Trinidad nad Jamaica because they feel B’dos should be taken down a peg or 2.

    But we are resilient,praying people in the main – and when faced with tough decisions – we will make them.

  39. Spooky

    Jupiter you have connected with the truth in your reply. The half of my reply that dropped out questioned the notion that majority of Guyanese have Bajan ancestry. I simply ask for the facts to support that statement that we often hear from self serving quarters . How come there are mountains of hard evidence about large Bajan exodus to Panama , Cuba etc but none for British Guiana. This claim I think is a ruse because it lacks historical authenticity.

  40. You are aware that Mr. Campbell made the comments about Jamaica, and Mr. Campbell is the father of the decease, Mr. Campbell made his reference in relation to this tragedy, and it is Mr. Campbell’s own words that I am opinionating on. Of course you do, but it is more likely that the truth of his comments is too much for you too bare that you would ignore them to focus elsewhere. I am one Barbadian that doesn’t care to seek or keep friends at the expense of the truth. I am one Barbadian that will give way to the demonstrated best practices of multiculturalism and pay critical attention to its many failings. The GoB does not have the right to enter into social/cultural integration schemes without the consent of the people, and I will not rest until the stupidity of this ill conceived and ill prepared and out of control open borders policy is reversed, and the proper policy of planned immigration with requirements to be met, is put in place.
    Far from me to tell you what should be painful for you to observed as no such advice from you will be entertained, but what has been painful for me to observed is the decades old lawlessness in Jamaica, the yearly murder statistics, (probably the highest in the world) the pervasiveness of Drugs the decadence of the dancehall culture. No one can tell Jamaicans what to do save Jamaicans themselves, and until esteem members of the society like you do all that you can to stem these activities then I don’t want them to visit our space en masse as is now being made possible.

  41. …..Would it not be more productive for you to try to understand the Guyanese psyche? Maybe in so doing you can come up with some strategies to help your own, but you are right if more persons in Barbados and in Antigua were to think like me, it is possible that you would have been force to stay in Guyana and deal with the issues there rather than run away and make grandiose claims that cannot be substantiated by anything on the ground “In country.”
    What are your opinions on the contents of this website? http://www.guyanauas.org
    ……I am not aware that Barbadians deliberately attempted such, but I am aware that “black belly sheep” is a common derogatory name Indo-Guyanese give to Afro-Guyanese, I am also very aware that those Barbadians who migrated to Guyana were never accepted and that their descendent to this day fair no better. If there is a historical period in our Caribbean experience that we can look to with regards to migration and its effects and that we can learn from then this is it.
    If there is anything that I have attempted to communicate and that I have failed to do as a result of misplace tenses please let me know so that I can aid in your understanding. Chances are that you did not miss anything as a result of bad grammar and that your convenient role of Language maven is but a rouse to silence and censor me. Good luck. :D In spite of my bad grammar I think you do understand me when I say that Guyana is a failed state. People have been leaving Guyana en masse for the last 50 years. More recently we have seen resurgence in what I refer to as catalog brides out of Guyana. :D

  42. Guyanese in Antigua says:
    January 11th, 2007 at 9:31 am
    Just so you know. I am not one of the Guyanese on the run from the recent disgraceful situation in my country. I left Guyana aeons ago by virtue of marriage to a non-Guyanese. Would I have left anyway? Honestly….yes. But I’m still very proud of my country and never miss an opportunity to visit. I won’t trade it for anything else in the world.
    ——————————————————
    Ha ha ha ha I was going to have some fun with this, but it serves the truth of my opinions very well, even if you did not intended it. So yuh married your way out of Guyana, well you are not alone and many continue to take this path out. ha ha ha ha

  43. The fundamental reason for the failure of the West Indies Federation was that it was never planned from the bottom up, but from the top down. Hence, the problems of how it would affect the people at the bottom in several ways never became critical until discussions reached near the bottom end of the top-down process. That is when the stage was set for collapse. Edward Seaga
    —————————————————————
    The management of this change has not to my mind asked the difficult questions concerning current cultural trends in the societies that are being integrated and how best to deal with the negatives while exploiting the positives. The approach to my mind has been as if there are no social negatives and therefore no need to spend time looking at potential fall out, and for ways to address them. These are legitimate concerns and they have been met with some of the harshest comments from our leaders, members of the landed gentry and others who stand to benefit from this significant change. Adrian

    CSME and caribbean integration is occuring in much the sameway

  44. Jupiter

    Speak to afro-guyanese,and afro – trinis,the indians in these countries are creating havoc there.

    And in time they will do the same in Barbados if bajans allow them?

    Time will tell,but check out Jamaica,these feisty,black conscious jamaicans kept them in check and insisted that they assimilate and see themselves as ‘jamaicans first,and not indians first’.

    Whether or not they agreed with this,the fact is that they were not allowed to practise their clannish behaviour.
    Hopefully jamaicans continue this way.

  45. Such understandings of the racial divide in these two societies continue to escape the thoughts and opinions of the “Quick labelers” of the Barbadian people. It is our role to remind them. Don’t be thin skin they are vicious in their efforts to stymie the truth of their beloved countries, and too lazy to lift a finger to help their fellow citizen, for they would rather run away to live in comfort. coo coo birds i say.

  46. Guyanese in Antigua

    ************** NOTICE FROM AUNTIE MOSES…

    ********* RACIAL CONTENT – RACIAL NAME CALLING ********

    We are going to leave this comment up FOR NOW.

    As far as we are concerned it comes up to and over the line with the use of the word “coolies” in a non-academic context.

    Also – it is one thing to say that Jamaicans are violent by virtue of their colour, and another thing to say that this is due to blood line or race.

    We have also received many racially-based spam comments in the last 24 hours from an IP that is suspiciously close to the IP of this commenter.

    ****** QUESTION FOR OUR GENTLE READERS ….

    Should we leave this comment up? Does it go over the line that we as the BFP community wish to maintain?

    Let’s hear what you have to say, please!

    Auntie Moses

    ********************************************

    Original comment as posted ….

    Just a couple of facts.

    1. I did not marry my way out of Guyana. Notice I said I left Guyana aeons ago. When I left, the dollar was G1.40 to US$1.00. Maybe none of you were born at that time and don’t know that Guyana was once a thriving state.

    2. It is totally untrue to say that Indo Guyanese call Afro Guyanese “black belly sheep.” used by Bajans to get into Guyana is because an old dressmaker friend of mine, whom I did not know was Bajan wanted to return home and didn’t have a passport because she came to Guyana as black belly sheep. I wasn’t being nasty when I said that. It is true. Apparently at that time, Guyana imported sheep from Barbados and when the ship was set to sail, the captain, obviously in collusion with some of the passengers, passed off his human cargo as sheep. I didn’t make that up.

    3. Guyana is in fact a failed state as far as its economy goes. The same can happen to Barbados. Obviously Barbados was once not so prosperous, prompting Bajans to risk life and limb by boat to travel to Guyana posing as animals. What we are witnessing now is reverse migration. And I can tell you that no truthful Bajan could ever say that he or she was not welcome in Guyana and treated as family. Guyanese are by nature, extremely hospitable people. That is why so many of our Caribbean brothers and sisters made Guyana their home – most of them without the necessary immigration credentials.

    We all know that nothing in life remains the same and if I understand some of the posts here, many of you are not pleased with your government and fear that there can be severe consequences if something is not done to stop some of the mistakes being made. Politicians, and especially those who remain in power too long, become a law unto themselves and the latter years of their tenure are generally littered with bad decisions and ill-conceived ideas. Of course I suspect the whipping horse if things go wrong would be illegal immigration.

    Regarding your comments on the racial divide. I agree that the Jamaicans did a much better job handling their east Indian population. Jamaicans are by nature, aggressive people. But don’t knock Guyanese and Trinis for not being able to fully integrate their indian population. Look right there in Barbados. You have not been able to do the same with the few coolies you all have running around Barbados either. It’s just that those you have there are much less so you don’t feel the effects of their presence. They are just as clannish in Barbados as they are in Guyana and Trinidad.

    And finally Adrian, I did get your drift, bad grammar notwithstanding. That was a deliberate low blow. Cheers anyway. You seem like a nice guy. A little misguided in your xenophobia but we all have our faults. Trust me, if Barbados fails, (and in all sincerity, I would not like to see that), it won’t be as a result of the riff-raff Guyanese element. And don’t just focus on them. Look at the many outstanding Guyanese living in your country and contributing in a meaningful way to its development. I once lived there too during my travels around the Caribbean and would like to think I made a positive contribution too. There is a lot less that divides us than unites us.

  47. Guyanese in Antigua

    I wasn’t talking about the indo Guyanese population in Barbados. I was referring to those who have been there earlier. You know…… like those in the poultry industry. The ones who suck the lifeblood of a country and repatriate their funds to their “homeland” I’m sure you all know who I’m talking about.

  48. GIA

    People have been leaving Guyana en masse for the last 50 years.

    Are you aware that Bajans have also been leaving Barbados en masse for as long as anyone can remember? How yo think there are so many Guyanese/Bajans Adrian? There ain’t a country on God’s earth that doesn’t have a Bajan. And that is not an indictment. The movement of Guyanese out of Guyana to places other than north America and the UK is a recent phenomenon and not for 50 years as you suggest. Bad management by Burnham is what caused it!. I am not ashamed to admit it. And if you don’t watch your politicians and put them under manners, it can happen in Barbados too. We are both singing from the same hymn sheet when it comes to governance. Thankfully, you don’t have the scourge of race to add to the equation as we did.

  49. GIA

    Adrian, I just took a cursory glance at guyanausa.org. I’m not so sure what is it you wanted me to look at. Certainly not the statistics about emigration etc. If that were true, there would be no one living in GT now. Obviously that site is the brainchildof a schizo.

  50. ILLUMINATOR

    I must agree with what GIA had to say. Its just takes a few terms of bad political management and decisions and we could be in the same boat as those other countries. However , immigration must have a measure of control as our land mass is already quite small for the present population. So i don’t think we can have the luxury of more relaxed regulations like our much larger neighbours.

    I don’t know why people keep crying down Jamtown though , they have produced an amazing number of note worthy people over the years from Bob Marley to Marcus Garvey. I think its very sad that they murder rate is such that it is along with their many other problems. A solution would be very complex but would definitely need to start with some serious poverty alleviation .Serious poverty is a breeding ground for extreme behaviour . Hopefully we won’t have to find that out first hand .However , political posturing , corruption and mismanagement has alot to do with the current situation.

  51. ILLUMINATOR

    jI must agree with what GIA had to say. Its just takes a few terms of bad political management and decisions and we could be in the same boat as those other countries. However , immigration must have a measure of control as our land mass is already quite small for the present population. So i don’t think we can have the luxury of more relaxed regulations like our much larger neighbours.

    I don’t know why people keep crying down Jamtown though , they have produced an amazing number of note worthy people over the years from Bob Marley to Marcus Garvey. I think its very sad that they murder rate is such that it is along with their many other problems. A solution would be very complex but would definitely need to start with some serious poverty alleviation .Serious poverty is a breeding ground for extreme behaviour . Hopefully we won’t have to find that out first hand .However , political posturing , corruption and mismanagement has alot to do with the current situation.

  52. Rumplestilskin

    GIA Says>> Thankfully, you don’t have the scourge of race to add to the equation as we did.

    Ho, ho. Honestly there is an element of this from extremists from all races. And there are those who would wish to catalyse such for their own purposes.

    Reality is that we are all Barbados. The same way all races make up Guyana, Trinidad.

    What people sometimes cannot grasp, due to either lack of education compounded by seeds of hate being planted or plain hate, is that one of the factors which is a cornerstone of any successful society is tolerance.

    Tolerance for all races and religions. We should not even have to go there, as we are fellow Barbadians, not distinguished by significantly great racial or religious differences, basically.

    The only distinguishing factor should be behaviour. How one behaves and conducts oneself may distinguish ones company. I have no problem with that. I am not going ‘partying’ on an evening with a marijuana smoking, ‘bashment culture’ individual.

    My choice. My right. And so it should be.

    But see any country where either tribal or racial differences are allowed to pervade the thoughts and actions of the citizens, and you see problems, which could appear insurmountable.

    Guyana, Somalia, Iraq, some in the Eastern bloc.

    Indeed, other countries are brought to their knees by sheer greed i.e. Venezuela. But such may be countered successfully by social reform programs, as it would (appear) are now being attempted.

    An argument may be raised that greed is ultimately the source of problems in countries with significant etnic divides.

    And maybe that IS the issue, that there are those who seek power use the ethnic divides for their own purposes.

    However, there are those situations, such as Iraq where the Sunni/ Shia divide demonstrates, where ethnic divides are more entrenched and bode only ill for the country.

    Tolerance. Without this, all other efforts will remain hamstrung.

  53. Jamaerican

    It is very sad ….However this shows that these children of the priviliged society have just a bit too much free time on their hands…It is very sad that a young man life detiorated and one commit murder….No matter how it is said…the depravity is not only in the ghettos but all over the island…Make these kids work…they should have been furthering the paths of their parents…my comments are harsh yes…but I am tired of excuses…it is time to act and prevent more kids from fallen off the line…

  54. Jamaican

    Well, Adrian and Jupiter have, as expected, fallen into the Bajan habit of posing as victims or potential victims. Whether its to lock out big ugly American companies who want to do the unthinkable – sell fast food – or big scary Jamaicans/Antiguans/Guyanese who want to gobble up their wealth…its always the same. The barriers are erected, the defences go up and the vision narrows. When will Bajans learn that no-one is planning to take anything away from them? That globalisation is a reality and if you crumble because of globalisation then what did you really have to start with? You think protectionism – in all its forms – is the answer? You demean and cheapen Barbados and its talents and ability if you think that an influx of foreigners will suddenly upset the apple-cart. Is it that you really believe this, or is it just mean-spiritedness and xenophobia trying to find some intellectual cover? But just to address some specific points: Jupiter – I have no interest in Barbados being “pulled down a peg or two”.

    I am in fact always very pleased when I travel there and notice positive changes, like the road improvements being done, the airport, the creation of the park by Cheapside as well as the constant state of development on the West Coast and in its environs. No my dear sir/madam, I harbour no ill feelings towards your country. As I said, Barbados is one of my favourite places, both people and physically. I still have no interest in living there, but I like to visit often. Adrian, of course it pains me to see what has happened in my beloved country and home, but my original post was that I was appalled that you would use the opportunity of this human tragedy to mount your high horse and spout off about the comparisons about Barbados and Jamaican society. I maintain that position. There is something about you that suggests to me that you have never visited the place and have imbibed like mother’s milk the selected bad news from Jamaica that is routinely printed in the Bajan press (to make Bajans feel better about themselves perhaps? :-)) believing this to be the sum total of a wonderfully diverse and poetically beautiful country, albeit with searing social and economic issues.

  55. Jupiter

    Isn’t amazing that even though you are the one wearing the shoe,and feeling the pinch of the tight shoe,yet a complete stranger has the nerve to tell you ‘stop moaning the shoe seems all right to me’.

  56. Jamaican

    Don’t confuse perception with objective reality.

  57. INBIM

    I have to admit that from my experiences Barbadians are extremely xenophobic. They seek to fight of people they refer to in derogatory terms as “foreigners” because they blame them for their misery, their inability to purchase land, and the inferior level of productivity and discipline. Their accent quite often inhibits the average person from having a decent conversation with a “foreigner” and they resort this by saying that other people “speak funny”. I know my observations will not change much, because being defensive is a major way to deal with insecurities. Face it Bajans, you have no one to blame but yourself. You have produced below standard, you work attitude spells the word lazy and the lack of beautiful scenery robs you of creativity. I am sorry, it must be admitted. Please get over yourselves. Your focus on “foreigners” for you problems is blinding you to the actual problems. You need to protest about these ZRs: with that kind of violence-promoting music they play on board, and you jus sit back and accept it like its nothing, because “its Bajan”. Its one of the many things you close your eyes to and look with spite at foreigners and try to convince yourselves that everything is alright as long as we keep the foreigners out. You need to pull up your socks and prepare to compete with quality. How? By raising your own standards, not by trying to dodge.

  58. K

    Jupiter and Adrian have proven to me that in every race and ethnic group you can find an equivalent of the KKK. In a different world people like these two would put a rope around the neck of Jamaicans and other caribbean nationals that they term “undesireable” and hang them slowly and painfully for all to see… just because they were convinced that their presence would put a smear on their ‘perfect’ society. The joke is that if the KKK were around the Bajans would be the first they would come for since the “look” of the majority of their population would probably most closely epitomize what these white racists would term as ugly. If they were afraid of anyone “mixing” with them it would be the bajans. But in this reality people like Adrian and Jupiter adequately represent them (i.e. KKK) with their foolish country bajan board house intolerance. By the by I am Jamaican and while your sensationalism-hungry newspapers insist on blowing up everything that is happening in our beautiful island I comfortably walk my road at night before I head into my beautiful home (the likes of which I have not seen but in very few places in barbados). I can also change in my room comfortably and not have to worry about the perverted peeping toms so prevalent in great ole BIM haha… The bajans make me laugh .. and their powerful men keep on marrying foreigners. How in heavens will you stop integration with that Adrian? Please don’t answer your ignorance is too much for even me who felt I had seen it all. You are indeed what we in JA call a hignorant h.ss !!

    I hope the next time some person in the US or UK discriminates against you because of the sound of your voice or the colour of your skin or the coo coo (however the hell you spell that unsavoury dish!) in your plate you will support them in their quest to exclude the likes of you from their society … after all you should understand.

  59. Yardbroom

    It is rather sad, when individuals tear each other apart on a public forum. The supposed righteous of their cause, is often diminished by the spectacle we witness.

    My observations of tragic events on this blog, is that in the aftermath of the event, comes vitriol of the most inconsiderate kind. Sometimes we seem unable to consider the other person’s feelings. It is as if we have something to say, and it should be said at all cost, the hurt it causes to each other, is immaterial.

    I only wish at times, we could hold back from the vindictiveness and spite, evident in our postings, and realize that despite the anonymity which our names give us, as a group we display ourselves to a wider world.

    It should not be, that the wider world and its perception contains us, but it should be that we contain ourselves because of our own “maturity of thought”, in order to make our space a better place.

    We can only make Barbados – like anywhere else a better place – if we first make ourselves better. It serves no purpose asking great things of – particularly our leaders – if we cannot adjust, or change our attitudes, to take account of others, with whom we interact.

    This prevalent attitude of mind leads to, I will fill my bag first, regardless of the circumstances, and to hell with everyone else. In the long term, it will get us no where, as it can become infectious in a society, and fragments the society we are seeking to build, because of injustices perceived, and real.

    Most importantly, it shows our apparent lack of consideration to our fellow human beings .

  60. Rey.

    You the man/woman, Yardbroom. I just read these comments and agreed with you. I look at life from a different angle. You can call me a cynic or a skeptic but I believe it nonetheless- the world is in a continuous slide to total destruction.
    The world can only come back from this slide if we see each other as brothers/sisters and I know this to be impossible.
    So I find I am worrying less about the things I cannot control and dealing more with the things I can. I sure sleep better at night!

  61. Rey.

    What is this thing with the time at BFP. It is now 8:09 a.m and the posting says 12:10 p.m. Is it a standing joke or ????

    ************************

    BFP Replies

    Hi Rey,

    This blog displays GMT Greenwich Mean Time (sometimes called UTC – Universal Time) so that our readers all around the world can determine exactly when a post or comment was written no matter how local time where they live fluctuates.

  62. ReefxJAWBREAKERz

    THIS IS MY COUSIN AND UNCLE!!!!! :(

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