Municipal Solid Waste Tax is another attack on a beleaguered Barbados tourism and hotel sector

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“What is especially galling is that we are expected to pay this new solid waste tax imposition before we receive the tens of thousands of Dollars we are still owed in NIS and VAT refunds…”

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

When my now wife and I ‘discovered’ a then virtually derelict Arawak Inn back in 1988, we never really set out to become seasoned hoteliers. More like having the privilege of living in a big ‘house’ right on the ocean and sharing it with a few friends and the many clients who followed us over the years with our British based tour operators business. Every restored and occupied room was another gallon of paint or new soft furnishing.

Our first major setback came when after paying the initial deposit to buy the hotel, the value of Sterling plummeted from over BDS$4 to the Pound to BDS$2.88 at the time of completion. As all our funds were brought in from overseas, there was no alternative as an option.

Effectively this wrote-off literally every cent we had budgeted for renovation and improvement of the property. As new residents it was virtually impossible to borrow monies from the banks. They wanted a trading record, three years of audited accounts, cash flow forecasts and business plans among many other requirements. Suppliers, with very few notable exceptions, would not grant us credit and so we learnt very quickly, how to not only survive, but flourish and transform the hotel from earned trading revenue.

While easy to say now, in hindsight, it was probably the best thing that happened, leaving us totally debt-free years later.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism

Prince of Wales who later betrayed his duty, disliked Barbados, found ‘coloured population revolting’. That’s okay, we didn’t care much for racist Edward VIII either!

HMS Renown Barbados

(HMS Renown, Barbados 1919 – click photo for large)

‘There are over 170,000 of them the white population is very small and they aren’t much to look at all too deadly dull and of course depressingly primitive.’

Local scenery ‘ugly’, ‘coloured population revolting’, Barbados a ‘bum place’

… Edward VIII, Prince of Wales, talks about Barbados and Bajans in letters to his friend’s wife in the Mail Online

Royal adulterer wrote to his mistress – who was someone else’s wife

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

Edward VIII with Mistress, MRS Freda Dudley-Ward and friend, William Dudley-Ward (click for large)

It takes a special kind of man to be photographed with a friend – knowing that you are secretly banging his adulterous wife.

Apparently the spoiled royal brat Edward VIII was that kind of man.

Edward was also a vile racist, according to recently offered letters written by the then Prince of Wales on a goodwill tour to Barbados in 1920.

Concern for his fellow man? Empathy? Ha! When a man was lost at sea on the HMS Renown (history link), Edward wrote to his friend’s wife: “Of course one man’s death means nothing.”

The little shit later went on to abdicate his throne and duty to Britain and the Empire for another piece of quiff – American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

When I think of all the good he could have done in his life, or at least could have tried to do, and how self-centered his choices were – Edward VIII seems nothing but a pathetic excuse for a man.

Reading his letters, as a proud Bajan I can say that Edward VIII wasn’t fit to clean Bajan toilets, let alone be our monarch.

contributed by Passin thru

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, History

Harlequin house of cards continues to fall

Dave Ames Harlequin Ponzi

David Ames – Harlequin CEO and Ponzi Scheme King!

Where does one start when considering the sad tale of ‘investors’ who trusted their life savings with the predators working to sell never-to-be-constructed resort units for Harlequin?

These predators (called ‘financial advisors’) received 9 percent of the sale price off the top – and that came from the client’s 30 percent deposit! The clients were not told that about a third of their deposit was going as a sales commission, because that would have been an instant indication to most folks that something was terribly wrong.

Harlequin bastards. Most of the ‘financial advisors’ were unregulated, uninsured and totally unqualified. The ‘investment vehicles’ were different corporations in different countries – obviously created for the sake of confusion, hiding money and avoiding liabilities. Often Harlequin sold units on land that it did not own.

The scams could only have been pulled off with the cooperation of elected and appointed government officials in the different countries.

Harlequin’s ‘business model’ (I use the term with a rising anger) was totally unsustainable and is proof that the whole Harlequin scheme was an intended scam from the start. Like any Ponzi scheme, Harlequin collapsed because payments to previous investors relied upon finding sufficient new suckers to swindle. Once the cracks start to appear and new investors shy away, these types of frauds unravel very quickly.

And so it was, and is, with Harlequin…

UK Financial Ombudsman Service sides with Harlequin victims

The recent Financial Times Advisor article ‘Financial Ombudsman Service – FOS decision on Harlequin must be tip of iceberg‘ tells the story of the next chapter well. One of the profiting scam artists, Harris Knights, has been ordered to compensate a ripped off couple in full…

“… the ombudsman has ordered Harris Knights to take ownership of the Harlequin investment and compensate the couple in full.”

Thailand Court sides with Harlequin Victims   
Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Crime & Law, Offshore Investments, Real Estate

Origins of the Barbados Solid Waste Tax

Barbados Solid Waste Tax (click photo for large)

Hey Boss! I just got a great idea for a new tax!

Our thanks to Bajan Poppets!

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Filed under Barbados, Politics

A camel named Barbados

Barbados Taxes

In case anyone hasn’t noticed, opposition to the new Solid Waste Tax is turning into a national cause – uniting taxpayers across party lines. It may well be the proverbial ‘straw’.

The sight of Opposition Leader Mia Mottley cursing the government for introducing the tax is laughable though – considering that it was Mottley and Arthur and their BLP who robbed de place bare when they were the government. Had the BLP government acted properly when in power, Barbados would be in much better shape today.

We’re broke. Something has to give and both parties are responsible.

But this tax is not going to fly. People haven’t got it, and they can’t pay what they don’t have and won’t ever have.

Freundel Stuart should read some books on what happened 1937.

Different situation, I know, but this kettle is already boiling and the Municipal Solid Waste Tax just turned up the heat.

Thanks to talented artist Connie O’Neill for allowing us to steal her drawing.

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Filed under Barbados, Business, Business & Banking

re-Discover Barbados excellent example of Government & Private Sector cooperation

“As we enter week six since the new launch of the re-DISCOVER restaurant initiative I would like to use this column to publicly thank the Barbados Tourism Authority for their whole-hearted support.

It has been a refreshing revelation and a role model example of how the private and public sector can work successfully together to drive additional business.”

Adrian Loveridge - tourism expert, hotel owner

Adrian Loveridge – tourism expert, hotel owner

In tourism, just like many other businesses we talk frequently about the bottom line but do we really pay enough attention to the subject.

For instance, how many hotels have sat down and calculated what difference a ten per cent increase in average annual occupancy and a net rise of US$10 or US$20 per occupied room night would make to their turnover and viability?

To use a simple example of a lower end 100 room hotel with a normal nightly rate of US$100 and currently achieving an annual occupancy level of 50 per cent which is pretty typical of many of our properties – In accommodation revenue alone that would generate US$1.825 million a year. Take that occupancy level to 60 per cent at an average of US$110 per room and immediately turnover climbs to US$2.409 million.

That’s an income differential of US$584,000.

Or US$830,000 if the price rise is US$20 per room per night.   Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Barbados Tourism

How Bridgetown built the economic foundation of the British Empire – only to be discarded when the profits were gone.

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Slavery Reparations have never interested me because I know that whatever we receive will never be enough for the victims class, and that anything we do receive will be stolen by the political class. No reparations will ever touch my hand. No amount of reparations will provide a steady flow of clean water from my pipes or establish a modern sustainable economy.

Britain could pay us 10 billion pounds and not one new hospital bed or surgery will appear at that slum we call the Queen Elizabeth Hospital – or anywhere else. A trillion pounds will not erase the arrogance of government employees towards citizens, nor will it cure the ‘Island Time’ syndrome that makes foreign business investors run like mad from the Caribbean once they get over the rum, sun and sand.

Barbados is incapable of receiving and delivering reparations honestly and effectively for the general good.

Whose fault is that? I’m not sure, but I do know that at one time Barbados was the driving economic force and secure military base that built and maintained the British Empire.

Whatever Tristram Hunt has written in his new book Ten Cities that Made an Empire, he’s probably 50% correct and 50% nonsense. After all this time, who can say?

But I look forward to the read.

Cliverton

Ten Cities that Made an Empire by Tristram Hunt, review: ‘enthralling and compelling’

A fascinating account of 10 cities that were shaped by, and helped shape, British rule

Bridgetown, Barbados has always held a particular appeal for the British. The legacy of empire is all too apparent, and is, indeed, exploited for tourists. The series of historical attractions based on Plantation House present, as Tristram Hunt writes, “a sepia version of the colonial past”. Nostalgia for cricket, rum cocktails and the old plantation lifestyle trumps the blood-drenched history of slavery on the island. Bridgetown is a modern city, but the colonial memory continues to reverberate.  Continue reading

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Filed under Barbados, Culture & Race Issues, Economy, Human Rights, Slavery